Aerogravity evidence for major crustal thinning under the Pine Island Glacier region (West Antarctica)

first_imgThe West Antarctic Rift System provides critical geological boundary conditions for the overlying West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Previous geophysical surveys have traced the West Antarctic Rift System and addressed the controls that it exerts on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet in the Ross Sea Embayment. However, much less is known about the rift system under the Amundsen Sea Embayment, a key sector of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, which is thinning significantly today. New aerogravity data over the Pine Island Glacier region, one of the fastest flowing glaciers within the Amundsen Sea Embayment, sheds new light into the crustal structure under this dynamic part of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Three-dimensional (3-D) inversion of terrain-decorrelated free-air and Bouguer gravity anomaly data reveal significant crustal thinning beneath the catchment of Pine Island Glacier. Under the Byrd Subglacial Basin and the newly identified Pine Island Rift, Moho depth is estimated to be 19 ± 1 km. This is the thinnest crust observed beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Estimates of lithosphere rigidity (Te), based on isostatic models, yield a Te of 5 ± 5 km, which is comparable to values from modern rift systems such as the Basin and Range Province. Major crustal thinning, coupled with low lithosphere rigidity, attest to the considerable impact of continental rifting beneath this part of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. In analogy with the better known Ross Sea segment of the West Antarctic Rift System we suggest that the Amundsen Sea Embayment was affected by distributed Cretaceous rifting, followed by Cenozoic narrow-mode rifting. Narrow-mode rifting within the Pine Island Rift is particularly important as it may serve as a geological template for enhanced glacial flow associated with Pine Island Glacier.last_img read more

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Tenure Track Basic Science Faculty Position

first_imgJohns Hopkins Medicine’s newly established Institute forFundamental Biomedical Research (IFBR) located at The Johns HopkinsAll Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg, FL site has openings forfaculty at the Assistant Professor or Associate Professorlevel.We are interested in candidates whose proposed research hasrelevance to the control of metabolism and related to diseasestates with broad relevance to children’s health. Additionally,preferred research areas include, but are not limited to genomics,epigenomics, nuclear receptor research, lipid signaling,bioinformatics, transcriptional and system level analyses of cellsand tissues involved in whole body metabolism and/or diseaseprocesses. Candidates whose research offers translational potentialin obesity, diabetes, endocrine, inflammatory or degenerativediseases are particularly encouraged to apply.The Faculty opportunities require a PhD or MD/PhD in BiologicalScience or related field with outstanding training and experiencein research pertaining to one of the focus areas noted above.Candidates are expected to establish rigorous and competitive basicresearch programs addressing unmet clinical needs, and to securesupport from diverse funding sources. Applicants are also expectedto collaborate with existing members of IFBR and other JohnsHopkins faculty located both in Florida and Baltimore. Successfulcandidates are expected to have an impressive publication recordand exceptional research accomplishments consistent with theiracademic level. Proven ability to secure external funding would bea plus.Interested candidates should submit a CV, cover letter, selectionof representative publications, research statement and 3 referees.Please contact Laszlo Nagy with questions at [email protected] or toprovide additional documents.Johns Hopkins University is committed to active recruitment of adiverse faculty and student body. The University is an AffirmativeAction/Equal Opportunity Employer of women, minorities, protectedveterans and individuals with disabilities and encouragesapplications from these and other protected group members.Consistent with the University’s goals of achieving excellence inall areas, we will assess the comprehensive qualifications of eachapplicant.PhD or MD/PhD in Biological Sciences or related fieldStrong publication historyPlease apply via Interfolio and include your CV, cover letter,selected publications, research statement and 3 refereesThe Johns Hopkins University is committed to equal opportunity forits faculty, staff, and students. To that end, the university doesnot discriminate on the basis of sex, gender, marital status,pregnancy, race, color, ethnicity, national origin, age,disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity orexpression, veteran status or other legally protectedcharacteristic. The university is committed to providing qualifiedindividuals access to all academic and employment programs,benefits and activities on the basis of demonstrated ability,performance and merit without regard to personal factors that areirrelevant to the program involved.The successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject to apre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office at [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply depending on whichcampus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster.pdfImportant legal informationhttp://hrnt.jhu.edu/legal.cfmlast_img read more

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Five ways to get the most out of an online learning event

first_imgChoose how you interact with vendors. For the introverts in the crowd, online exhibitor halls allow you to go in, unseen if you wish, and read up on sponsor information on your own. Or, you can go in during times the online booths are staffed and connect with a company rep. I hope you find some of these tips useful as you attend online learning, perhaps at the November and December events CUES is offering. They both feature flat-rate pricing, allowing you to register as many staff as possible for one price. I’d love it if you’d email me with what works well for you. Approach your online learning with the right frame of mind. Continuing my previous thought, make sure you approach online learning with the idea of learning—not comparing it to in-person learning. As credit unions amply demonstrated this spring, for the most part you don’t need to be in a certain building to do your job. Similarly, you don’t have to drink hotel coffee, lug your tote bag of branded swag, or sit right in front of the presenter to learn important and useful things.  A big bonus of attending an online learning event is that you don’t have to get on a plane, travel across the country and be away from your family. Instead, you can learn—a lot—and then head back to the living room to help your kids with math homework.I’ve spent a great deal of time thinking about online learning events and the ways attendees can get the most out of them. Here are some of my takeaways: Make sure the language you’re using to describe your online learning gives full credit for its potential. The learning is “online”; it’s “digital”; but it’s not virtual, in the sense that it’s not a replacement for in-person learning. It’s just another way to learn and network. So, give your program of choice the linguistic respect it deserves! It’s still education whether you’re in a hotel ballroom, in your home office or on your couch. Look to learn from people you might not have previously been able to connect with. Echoing the idea that online learning is so cost effective and can make it possible for more people to be included, look to learn from people you haven’t met before, from parts of a credit union that are new to you. If you’re in marketing, you might be able to connect with staffers knowledgeable about IT or vice versa. If the event host offers an attendee list, be sure to leverage that as a networking tool. 26SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Sara Dyer Sara Dyer is director of executive education and meetings for CUES. In her role, she is responsible for the research, planning and execution of CUES’ conferences, seminars, and meetings. Previously, … Web: https://www.cues.org Detailscenter_img This is placeholder text This post is currently collecting data… Choose how you network with presenters and other attendees. One thing I’ve learned is that networking might look more like “engagement” during an online event. While you might wait until after the session to go up and ask the presenter a question in person, during online learning you might add a question to the chat instead. The cool part is that other attendees will likely be right there chatting with you! Also, be sure to look to see if the program offers online networking sessions with the speaker and other attendees outside of the main sessions. Without the cost of travel and lodging, your credit union can send more attendees to online learning. So, consider forming a group from your organization that’s prepared to discuss the presentations and chatted discussions—that can be done synchronously or later on after you have time to think it over. This can be a great way to make sure the learning sticks.last_img read more

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Syracuse breaks 3-week scoring drought in win against NC State

first_img Published on October 18, 2015 at 6:09 pm Contact Tomer: [email protected] | @tomer_langer Facebook Twitter Google+ Head Coach Phil Wheddon hadn’t even sat down yet, but he was already excited. After constantly citing his team’s need for a fast start — Syracuse hadn’t scored once in three weeks —Wheddon got exactly what he wanted. The Orange scored a less than a minute into the match.SU’s (5-10-1, 1-6-0 Atlantic Coast) offensive execution was the key component in the 3-0 win over North Carolina State (4-11-0, 0-6 ACC) on Sunday at SU Soccer Stadium.“It was great for the team to come out and get a quick goal like that,” Wheddon said. “…I was very happy for us that we were able to score the goal and settle down into a little bit of a rhythm.”Coming into the match, the Orange was in the midst of an offensive drought. The last time SU had scored was in a 3-1 loss to Virginia Tech on Sept. 27. The team’s goalless streak spanned over four games.Within 50 seconds on Sunday, that streak was snapped. Sophomore forward Eva Gordon took a pass and ran with the ball up the right sideline. She launched a ball toward the left goalpost and it landed at the feet of junior midfielder Emma Firenze, who fired it into the back of the net to give the Orange the early lead.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I think we really came out very hungry and we wanted to score early, and that was one of our goals, and we did so,” junior forward Stephanie Skilton said.That early goal made Sunday’s game the first time that the Orange held a lead since Sept. 17 against Drexel. The issue that’s plagued SU for most of the season – having to play catch-up after giving up a lead – was nonexistent on Sunday.The Orange added on to its early lead. Junior midfielder Maddie Iozzi possessed the ball on the left side of the field near the Wolfpack baseline. She passed the ball toward the middle of the field that hit off a defender and found its way to Skilton, who rifled the ball in to make it a 2-0 game.Coming out of the half, the Syracuse players looked ecstatic. Goalkeeper Courtney Brosnan was grinning cheek-to-cheek in the team huddle before resuming play.The Orange got out to another fast start in the second half. Just over a minute into the half, Alex Lamontagne took the ball down the left sideline, made a nifty inside move and kicked the ball toward the goal. The goalie deflected the ball, but Eva Gordon recovered, turned and fired into an empty portion of the net for a 3-0 SU lead.“Coach told us to come out strong … put the third goal away early so we set the tone,” Gordon said. “We didn’t want a 2-1 game in the second half,” Gordon said.Two of the goals the Orange scored came off of deflections in the box. Being in the right place to capitalize on rebounds was something the practiced over the course of the week.“It’s happened to us consistently throughout the year where a ball is served into box and its not the first person, the first runner that often scores it, it’s the second or third,” Wheddon said. “… We’ve been really working on trying to get more numbers into the box, and I thought today we did a very good job at that.”With a six-game losing streak now over, Wheddon wants his team to focus on continuing to play well and win the final three games of the season. Still, he acknowledged that this win could help the team morale.“Today was definitely a good day to get the win,” Gordon said.“We needed it.” Commentslast_img read more

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