Charge-free charity fundraising platform goes live

first_imgCharge-free charity fundraising platform goes live Melanie May | 19 October 2016 | News Tagged with: fundraising Technology A charity fundraising platform that sees 100% of donations go directly to the charities involved goes live this month.Wonderful.org, launched by Kieron James, uses the strapline ‘Don’t Just Give… Be Wonderful’, and will not charge charities or take any deductions. It will also be free from card processing charges, the first £1m of which Nexbridge, the telecommunications company co-founded by James, will pay. After the first million pounds of fundraising activity, transaction fees and all other costs will continue to be met by corporate sponsors.Each month, the website transfers all funds raised through the activities of fundraisers to charities’ bank accounts, making no deductions, and charities currently listed on the site include Cancer Research UK, Dogs Trust and Mind.James said:“We believe charities should receive every penny from fundraising efforts. We also believe that Gift Aid should be directed in full to the charities rather than the operators of fundraising platforms. This is why the Wonderful Organisation will not generate profit, or even cover costs, by deducting money from fundraisers’ sponsors or Gift Aid contributions. We are a non-profit organisation run by volunteers and funded entirely by like-minded, philanthropic businesses.”  133 total views,  1 views today Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis61  134 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis61 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

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Americas

first_img June 7, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Americas May 13, 2021 Find out more Organisation News Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says Americas Americas January 30, 2013 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Americas Reports Violence, polarization still obstruct reporting in AmericasJust as the emergence of major protest movements (and ensuing crackdowns) had a big impact on the rankings of certain countries in 2011, so a decline in the protests has logically also had an impact a year later. Chile, for example, rose 20 places to 60th in the index after the previous year’s student protests abated in 2012. Crackdowns were concentrated in the Aysén region, which saw big protests in the first quarter. But Chile’s improvement must be put in perspective. Its media landscape is skewed, community broadcast media are criminalized, especially in the Mapuche region, and journalists have run into difficulties when trying to investigate the 1973-90 military dictatorship.For similar reasons, the United States rose 15 places to 32nd, recovering a ranking more appropriate to the “country of the First Amendment.” Its previous year’s fall was due to the fact that the crackdown on the Occupy Wall Street movement did not spare reporters in the field. Canada, on the other hand, fell ten positions to 20th, losing its status as the western hemisphere’s leader to Jamaica (13th). This was due to obstruction of journalists during the so-called “Maple Spring” student movement and to continuing threats to the confidentiality of journalists’ sources and Internet users’ personal data, in particular, from the C-30 bill on cyber-crime.The clearest new trends are to be seen in the south. Brazil fell again, this time 9 places to 108th, after falling 41 places in 2011. Its media landscape is also badly distorted. Heavily dependent on the political authorities at the state level, the regional media are exposed to attacks, physical violence against their personnel, and court censorship orders, which also target the blogosphere. These problems were exacerbated by violence during the campaign for the October 2012 municipal elections.Media wars and coup precipitate fallsParaguay fell 11 places to 91st following President Fernando Lugo’s June 2012 removal in an “institutional coup d’état,” which had an almost immediate impact on the news media. A full-blown purge of employees in state-owned media created by the Lugo administration was accompanied by frequent programme censorship. The few community radio stations with broadcast frequencies were also scared of losing them. Despite a high level of physical violence against journalists, Peru rose 10 places to 105th, now topping Brazil, itself one place above Bolivia (109th), where several media were the targets of spectacular arson or dynamite attacks and both national and local polarization are having an impact. Ecuador fell 15th places to 119th after a year of extreme tension between the government and leading privately-owned media. This left it two places below Venezuela, where several media were closed arbitrarily, a journalist was killed and more than 170 cases of violence were reported in a “media war” climate.Although on a less dramatic scale, polarization is becoming a concern in Argentina, which slipped a few places to 54th amid growing tension between the government and certain privately-owned media, above all the Clarín group, which is resisting full implementation of the 2009 Ley de Medios, a law regulating the broadcast media. On the other bank of the River Plate, Uruguay continued its climb, this time to 27th position, within 10 places of Costa Rica, still Latin America’s leader at 18th.There has been little change in the marked contrasts that were seen in Central America in 2011. A lack of pluralism, intermittent tension with the political authorities, harassment and self-censorship are the main reasons for the scant change in Nicaragua (78th), Guatemala (95th) and Panama (111th), where attacks on journalists tripled in the space of a year, local unions said.On the other hand, El Salvador owes its enviable 38th place to government efforts to combat violence crime, even if journalists and media often complain about the lack of access to state-held information. The Dominican Republic rose 15 places to 80th because of a decline in violence against journalists and legal proceedings that threaten freedom of information. But it is still far behind its neighbour Haiti (49th), where the situation is still largely unchanged although some journalists have accused President Michel Martelly of hostility towards them.Caribbean turmoil, same countries at the bottomPolitical tension and judicial harassment account for the ranking of other countries in the Guyanas and Caribbean. Trinidad and Tobago (44th) still has not stopped its illegal monitoring of journalists’ phone calls and attempts to identify their sources, although it promised to stop in 2010. In Surinam (down nine places to 31th), the often stormy relations between President Desi Bouterse and many journalists are unlikely to improve after the passage of an amnesty law for the murders of around 15 government opponents, including five journalists, three decades ago when Bouterse was Surinam’s dictator. He returned to power through the polls in 2010.The seven-member Organization of East Caribbean States fell eight places to 34th because of often direct pressure from the political authorities on news media and the failure to move ahead with the decriminalization of defamation. Similar pressure was reported in Guyana (69th), whose ranking continues to suffer from the state’s monopoly of radio broadcasting.In the bottom third, Honduras was 127th because two journalists were killed in direct connection with their work and because the status quo imposed by the June 2009 coup remains unchanged. There has never been any let-up in the persecution of opposition media and community radio stations, or in the criminalization of human rights activists and grass-roots movements that provide information about such sensitive issues as land disputes, police abuses and minority rights.Although hopes have been raised by the latest negotiations between the government and FARC guerrillas, Colombia (129th) still has its paramilitaries-turned-drug traffickers, who are the enemies of all those involved in the provision of news and information. Another journalist was killed in 2012 although there was a slight decrease in the number of physical attacks.With six journalists killed, Mexico (153rd) has maintained its status as the hemisphere’s most dangerous country for the media. Violence and censorship were particularly noticeable during the controversial July 2012 elections, which restored the presidency to the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI). Cuba, the hemisphere’s only country to tolerate no independent media (or with few exceptions), got the region’s lowest ranking – 171st. The past year has seen a renewed crackdown on dissent and the island now has two journalists in prison, one of them a state media employee. center_img RSF_en June 3, 2021 Find out more 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts News WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists News to go furtherlast_img read more

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Tips for Preventing School Lunch Waste

first_imgSubmitted by Thurston County Solid WasteSchools throw away a lot of stuff, and a lot of that stuff is food.  In fact, 65% by weight of a typical school’s garbage is uneaten food. As coordinator of Thurston County’s Food to Flowers program, I help schools set up systems to prevent, reuse, recycle, and compost their waste. It always amazes me to see so much food that kids bring from home go uneaten. This includes whole sandwiches, full yogurt cups, and lots of untouched fruit and vegetables that end up in the trash can or the compost bin.All of this uneaten school food is part of a larger problem. The National Resource Defense Council estimates we waste 40% of all edible food in the U.S. This means the average U.S. household spends $1,350 to $2,275 a year on uneaten food. And that doesn’t include all of the water and energy used to produce food that gets landfilled or composted.As a new school year begins, here are some tips to help your family reduce lunch waste, conserve resources, and save money.• Pack it in, pack it out. When your kids bring lunch from home, ask them to bring home any food they didn’t eat. Looking at leftover lunch items is a great way to gain insight into your kids’ preferences and the right portion size. You may even be able to recover some of the uneaten food for future meals.• Let’s do lunch. Involve your kids in packing lunch the night before. Kids are more likely to eat a meal that they’ve helped prepare.• Learn what they like. Make a list of foods that your kids like to eat for lunch and update it often. You may find a simple change like switching to a different apple variety will help your kids eat the apples in their lunch boxes more regularly.• Eat ‘em again. Consider packing last night’s leftovers into today’s lunch, especially if it was popular the night before. You can even dress it up with an added ingredient or two.• Cut up fruits and vegetables. If you pack a whole banana or peach, kids are more likely to throw away what they don’t eat. Packing sliced fruits and vegetables is a great way to control portions, and lets your child easily save leftover pieces for later.• Make a deal. Before offering your kids an after-school snack, request that they finish uneaten items from their lunches.• Don’t forget the packaging. While you look for ways to cut down on food waste, consider also reducing the amount of packaging you send in your child’s lunch. Use reusable containers instead of disposable bags, and avoid single-serving packaged food items.Click here for more great waste-free lunch tips.For more information about the Food to Flowers program, click here  or contact Peter Guttchen at (360) 867-2283 or [email protected] Facebook6Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

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Debbie Mans Named DEP Deputy Commissioner

first_imgBy Jay Cook |TRENTON – A longtime environmentalist who worked to improve the health of local waterways is leaving the Two River area for Trenton.Debbie Mans, the former executive director of the Keyport-based NY/NJ Baykeeper, was appointed last week to serve as the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection’s (DEP) deputy commissioner, the agency announced. Mans was handpicked by the acting-DEP commissioner, Catherine R. McCabe.The hire has also served as a rallying cry for local environmentalists who say New Jersey will benefit from Mans’ years of expertise and ability to negotiate.“We had to play a lot of defense for the last eight years trying to stop bad things from happening,” said Greg Remaud, the acting executive director of NY/NJ Baykeeper. “We believe now that’s going to reverse.”Mans had been the face of NY/NJ Baykeeper since 2008, a self-proclaimed “citizen guardian” for the Hudson-Raritan Estuary that encompasses waters in New York and New Jersey. Mans and NY/NJ Baykeeper have been busy on the homefront in recent years, pushing for new programs and more pro-environmental legislation on the state level.More recently, Mans has been sternly opposed to the 23-mile-long Williams Transco Pipeline project planned to be built through Raritan Bay. She also testified before Congress last month in support of the $1.3-billion Passaic River Superfund cleanup site program destined for North Jersey.“I am excited to join the Department of Environmental Protection and get to work on a number of key environmental issues facing our state,” said Mans, in a statement. “We need to ensure that New Jersey is on a path to clean energy and sustainability, while also protecting public health, cleaning up polluted sites, and conserving our natural resources.”Mans’ path back to Trenton has been a busy one. From 2006 to 2008, she was the environmental and energy policy advisor to then-Gov. Jon Corzine, helping craft clean energy plans through 2020. Before that, from 2002 through 2006, she served as NY/NJ Baykeeper’s policy director.“Debbie Mans’ commitment to clean energy and conservation makes her an excellent choice to help the DEP lead the nation in developing solutions to such critical issues as climate change and renewable energy,” McCabe said in a statement. “Debbie has spent her entire career devoted to improving the environment for all, and I look forward to her expertise helping shape our mission.”Throughout that tenure of protecting water quality, organizing open space and fighting battles with large energy companies, Mans has collaborated with many of the local environmentalist groups who call the Two River area home.“It’s extremely important and of great value to have someone at that level who not only understands the issues of consequence that affect our quality of life, but also someone that knows the value of grassroots and citizen involvement,” said Cindy Zipf, Clean Ocean Action’s executive director.Zipf said COA has worked with Baykeeper on environmental law enforcement issues, as well as how to tackle green energy on a statewide platform in their time.Yet more than anything, Mans’ hire signals a stark change from Gov. Chris Christie’s DEP, Zipf said.“Time will tell, but it’s certainly a 180 in terms of the interest in broad environmental issues facing our state,” she said.Tim Dillingham, executive director of the American Littoral Society, said state policy is in more-than-capable hands.“She is smart and principled, an unfailing advocate for the environment with a lot of experience in both government and the advocacy sides,” Dillingham said. “I have nothing but high regard for her.”Dillingham and Mans go back to some of their first environmental policy positions. From 2000 to 2002, Mans was a policy and outreach specialist for the Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association in Pennington. At the same time, Dillingham was on the board of directors there.Their partnership flourished when they both ended up leading environmental groups headquartered along the same body of water along the Jersey Shore.NY/NJ Baykeeper has been one of the state’s leaders in reintroducing oyster reefs to rivers and bays. Oysters can filter up to 50 gallons of water a day and many believe they could be the answer to helping remove pollutants in the water.After installing manmade oyster castles off of the 2.9-mile-long Naval Weapons Station Earle Pier in Leonardo in 2016, NY/NJ Baykeeper announced in December oyster spat, or baby oysters were found growing on the structures.The American Littoral Society has been trying to implement a similar program in the Navesink and Shrewsbury rivers, beginning this past summer. Dillingham said his organization is following similar steps to see his program flourish in the two rivers.And Dillingham had a message for the private and public sectors who soon will interact with Mans.“She’s a great negotiator and she’s going to find a way to push the public’s agenda and still engage all the stakeholders that the state government has to please,” he said.Remaud Named Acting Executive DirectorNY/NJ Baykeeper announced on Tuesday evening that Greg Remaud would be named the organization’s acting executive director for the time being. Official changes and possible restructuring will happen in March when its board of directors convenes.It’s an honor for Remaud, who has been with NY/NJ Baykeeper now for two decades.“From Dery (Bennett), to Andy (Willner), to Debbie (Mans), those are three extraordinary environmentalists and human beings,” he said. “It means a lot to have that opportunity and follow in those footsteps.”Remaud’s time has been spent as NY/NJ Baykeeper’s conservation director, where he spent years “trying to preserve natural land and open space in areas that are densely developed where (residents) don’t have a lot.”Since the organization began in 1989, it has preserved over 3,500 acres of land ranging from the North Jersey Meadowlands to the Raritan Bayshore. Most recently, NY/NJ Baykeeper helped preserve 250 acres for the newly formulated Freneau Woods, an addition to the Monmouth County Park System.This article was first published in the Feb. 15-22, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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SANTA ANITA’S 19-DAY AUTUMN MEET TO BE HIGHLIGHTED BY SIX GRADE I BREEDERS’ CUP CHALLENGE RACES AS THE GREAT RACE PLACE OFFERS 12 OVERALL GRADED STAKES

first_img–30–Saturday, September 26FRONTRUNNER STAKES (G I)  $300,000   2 YO  1  1/16 MAWESOME AGAIN STAKES (G I)  $300,000   3 & UP  1  1/8 MCHANDELIER STAKES (G I)   $300,000    F, 2 YO   1  1/16 MUNZIP ME STAKES   $70,000+    F, 3 YO   abt 6 1/2 F (T)RODEO DRIVE STAKES (G I)   $300,000    F/M, 3 & UP  1 1/4 M (T)ZENYATTA STAKES (G I)   $300,000    F/M, 3 & UP  1 1/16 MSunday, September 27CITY OF HOPE MILE (G II)   $200,000   3 & UP  1 M (T)KING PELLINORE STAKES   $70,000+   3 & UP  1 1/4 M (T) Saturday, October 3SANTA ANITA SPRINT CHAMPIONSHIP (G I)  $300,000  3 & UP  6 FEDDIE D STAKES  (G III)   $100,000   3 & UP  abt 6 1/2 F (T)SWINGTIME STAKES ®   $70,000+    F/M, 3 & UP  1 M (T)Sunday, October 4LA WOMAN STAKES (G III)   $100,000   F/M, 3 & UP  6 1/2 FCALIFORNIA DISTAFF   $100,000   F/M, 3 & UP (CA)  abt 6 1/2 F (T)Saturday, October 10ZUMA BEACH STAKES   $100,000   2 YO  1 M (T)SURFER GIRL STAKES   $100,000   F, 2 YO  1 M (T)Sunday, October 11ANOAKIA STAKES   $70,000+    F, 2 YO  6 FMonday, October 12CALIFORNIA FLAG STAKES   $100,000    3 & UP (CA)  abt 6 1/2 F (T)Saturday, October 17AUTUMN MISS STAKES (G III)   $100,000    F, 3 YO 1 M (T)Sunday, October 18SPEAKEASY STAKES   $70,000+    2 YO  6 FSaturday, October 24TWILIGHT DERBY (G II)    $200,000   3 YO  1 1/8 M (T)Sunday, October 25SEN. KEN MADDY STAKES (G lll)    $100,000    F/M, 3 & UP   abt. 6 1/2 (T) BC PREPS SET FOR FIRST THREE WEEKENDS OF MEET AS TRACK TO OFFER 21 OVERALL STAKES DURING MEET WHICH RUNS FROM SEPT. 26 THROUGH OCT. 25See the Autumn Stakes Schedule here. ARCADIA, Calif. (July 22, 2015)–Santa Anita Park’s 2015 Autumn Meet, which will consist of 19 racing days beginning Saturday, Sept. 26 through Sunday, Oct. 25, will be highlighted by six Grade I Breeders’ Cup Challenge races, which are part of 21 overall added money events–12 of which are graded.With this year’s Breeders’ Cup World Championships scheduled to be run at Keeneland on Oct. 30 & 31, Santa Anita will offer five Grade I Breeders’ Cup preps on opening day, Sept. 26; the FrontRunner Stakes, for 2-year-olds at 1 1/16 miles, the Awesome Again Stakes, for 3-year-olds and up at 1 1/8 miles, the Chandelier Stakes, for 2-year-old fillies at 1 1/16 miles, the Rodeo Drive Stakes, for fillies and mares three and up at 1 ¼ miles on turf and the Zenyatta Stakes, for fillies and mares three and up at 1 1/16 miles.In addition to the afore mentioned Grade I offerings, Santa Anita will also offer five additional Breeders’ Cup prep stakes; the Grade II City of Hope Mile for three year olds and up on Sept. 27, the Grade III Eddie D. Stakes for three year olds and up at 6 ½ furlongs down the track’s hillside turf course on Oct. 3, the Grade III LA Woman Stakes at 6 ½ furlongs on the main track, the Surfer Girl Stakes, for 2-year-old fillies at one mile on turf and the Zuma Beach Stakes for 2-year-olds at one mile on turf–both of which will be run on Oct. 10.Santa Anita will also offer the Grade III Autumn Miss Stakes, for 3-year-old fillies at one mile on turf Oct. 17, the Grade II Twilight Derby, for 3-year-olds at 1 1/8 miles on turf Oct. 24, and the Grade III Senator Ken Maddy Stakes, for fillies and mares, three and up at 6 ½ furlongs down the track’s hillside turf course on closing day, Oct. 25.Santa Anita, which hosted the Breeders’ Cup for an unprecedented three consecutive years, from 2012 through 2014, will again host the biggest two days in racing for the ninth time in the fall of 2016.Dating back to the inaugural Breeders’ Cup, which was held at Hollywood Park in 1984, Santa Anita-based horses have accounted for 56 overall Breeders’ Cup wins.Santa Anita’s complete 2015 Autumn Stakes Schedule is attached and can also be viewed at santaanita.com.See the Autumn Stakes Schedule here.last_img read more

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Taylor-made! – Calabar star rewrites record books again

first_imgKingston College (KC) continue to go about their business in a workmanlike manner; Calabar High had another so-so day; Christopher Taylor is at it again; and the Edwin Allen machine is cranking into high gear. The ISSA-GraceKennedy Boys and Girls’ Athletic Championships had its fair share of high points yesterday, and with today’s penultimate day of competition promising major excitement with the 100m finals and key hurdles and field events battles, it’s the KC faithful who are happiest at this stage. The boys from North Street lead the way with 37 points, with Jamaica College (JC) keeping them company with 33.5. Petersfield High’s team has impressed all week and they are currently third on 28 points, with St Jago as next best on 24, and defending champions Calabar in fifth with 23.5 points. Edwin Allen have been hitting the right keys so far, hardly putting a foot wrong since the opening day of competition. They are on course to defend their Girls’ title with 47 points after six events, 14 ahead of Hydel, with Excelsior in third place on 26 points. Holmwood (24) and St Jago (23) round out the top five. CLASS TWO’S DEJOUR RUSSELL Calabar will have to work deep into Saturday night if they are to retain their title, but they certainly have the tools to do so. “I am not perturbed. We still have enough depth to go on and win,” said Calabar’s head coach Michael Clarke. Taylor, who already helped himself to the 400m record on Tuesday, was clearly not satisfied as he powered through the line in his Class Two Boys’ 200m semi-final, stopping the clock at 20.80, which betters another Calabar man – Ramone McKenzie’s 20.89 run in 2007. His schoolmate, Dejour Russell, followed up that run with an impressive one of his own, clocking 21.08 to win his semi-final, knowing very well that the defending champions will be banking heavily on maximising points in this event in tomorrow’s final. Herbert Morrison scored an unlikely one-two in the Boys’ Class Three high jump final, pushing with gold-medal winner Antonio Hanson and his teammate, Javeir Hall, both clearing 1.85m, in the process pushing pre-Champs favourite Lamar Reid (Calabar), 1.75m into third place. Edwin Allen High’s Janique Burgher won the Class Three girl’s high jump event after clearing 1.70m ahead of Shauntia Davidson (Hydel), 1.65m, and Excelsior’s Kaliah Jones, who also cleared 1.65m. In a closely contested girls Class Four long jump final, St Jago’ Dayshanae Hall took home the gold with a 5.17m leap, finishing ahead of Edwin Allen’s Paula-Ann Chambers, 5.14m, and Excelsior’s Samoya Neil, 5.13m. Petersfield’s Sanjae Lawrence took gold in the Class One Boys’ discus event with a 53.90m heave to get the better of Excelsior’s Phillip Barnett, 53.78m, and Calabar’s Warren Barrett, who would have been disappointed with his 52.88m bronze-medal mark. The Boys’ Class Two shot put title was won by Petersfield’s Daniel Cope, with a distance of 16.81m. Second place went to Meadowbrook’s Cobe Graham, 16.22m, with another Petersfield athlete, Courtney Lawrence, 15.62m, taking third. Michael Campbell (JC), who clocked 10.83, and Jhevaughn Matherson (KC), 10.95, both dipped below 11 seconds despite a strong headwind in the Class One Boys’ 100m, with other podium contenders Raheem Chambers (St Jago), 11.02, and Nigel Ellis (St Elizabeth), 11.04, also looking comfortable in qualifying to today’s semi-finals. With Tyreke Wilson missing due to injury, his Calabar teammate Dejour Russell seems to have little to be worried about where the Class Two Boys 100m gold medal is concerned. Russell followed Wilson to the line in a Calabar one-two at last year’s championships, but he is expected to boss the event this time around. He was certainly commanding in winning his heat yesterday afternoon, stopping the clock at 11.49 with little effort. He was still making his way back to the Stadium East area when Munro College’s AndrÈ Edwards posted 10.95 to win his heat and perhaps give the Calabar man something to think about, with JC’s Chislon Gordon, 11.06, and Gary Gordon (St Jago), 11.28, also advancing impressively. Top-billed Jamaica College (JC) pair of defending Class One triple jump champion, O’Brien Wasome, who already won gold in the Class One Boys’ long jump on Wednesday, and record holder Clayton Brown will take their rivalry into today’s final after both booked safe passage from yesterday’s preliminary round. Wasome won his section with a 14.61m effort ahead of Calabar man Javier Lowe, 14.38m, and Old Harbour’s Ryan Brown, 14.15m. Brown was third in his section with a mark of 14.47m, but there is a lot more in the tank. Jordan Scott (Campion), 15.04m, led all qualifiers, with Calabar’s Gabriel Allen, 14.49m, also doing well to qualify. St Jago’s Keenan Lawrence is the form athlete in the Class Two Boys’ 1500m, with many expecting him to seriously test Kemoy Campbell’s record of 3:58.06 set in 2007 He was comfortable in qualifying for the final, winning his heat in 4:12.98 ahead of Calabar’s Kimar Farquharson, who posted 4:13.40 for second place. St Elizabeth Technical’s Dwight Mason was, however, the fastest among the qualifiers, stopping the clock at 4:12.89. The Class One equivalent saw Rusea’s athlete Akeem Colley, who won his heat in a season’s best 4:05.40, registering the quickest time going into the final, with gold-medal favourite and defending champion Shevan Parkes finishing second in a time of 4:06.01. Samara Spencer of Hydel High leads all qualifiers into tomorrow’s final of the Class One long jump – set for 4:53 p.m. – after registering a huge season best of 6.04 metres during yesterday’s prelims. Excelsior will seek to continue their fine showing at this year’s championships in the Class Four high jump final as their duo of Shantae Foreman and Daniel Harris both cleared 1.55m, with gold-medal favourite Foreman doing so on her first attempt. Amelia Davis of Wolmer’s Girl led six others who cleared 1.50m. RETAIN TITLElast_img read more

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Small ball leads to big win for NoHum Giants in opening round of Area One tourney

first_imgArcata >> If executed correctly, “small ball” can lead to big things.As it typically applies in baseball, the term relates to offenses that bunt, steal, squeeze and hit-and-run their way to scoring or “manufacturing” runs.In Wednesday’s opening-round of the 17U American Legion Area One Tournament, the Northern Humboldt Giants utilized small ball for big effects.Down 3-0 early in the game, the Giants scored nine-straight runs to down the Chico Blues 9-4 and advance to Wednesday’s winner’s …last_img read more

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Trade assistance must help all affected farmers

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Following the recent escalation of trade tensions between China and the United States that will likely exacerbate the erosion of agricultural export markets and further depress commodity prices, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is expected to announce a trade assistance package to support struggling family farmers and ranchers.In a letter sent to U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, National Farmers Union (NFU) provided recommendations for how best to “craft a package that will adequately address the broad, long-term impacts to all of American agriculture.”“Family farmers and ranchers have borne the brunt of the trade war with China, which has intentionally targeted American agricultural products with retaliatory tariffs. We appreciate the administration’s recent efforts to relieve the immense economic pressure those in the agriculture industry are feeling as a result,” said Roger Johnson, NFU President Roger Johnson. “Though China’s tariffs have specifically targeted soybeans, pork, and sorghum, many other commodities have been impacted, both directly and indirectly. We ask that trade assistance be offered to producers of all affected commodities, and that payment rates be based on historical production. In addition, we recommend that the USDA address the growing problem of oversupply by providing farmers with incentives to reduce overall production.“The ever-worsening financial challenges being forced on family farmers and ranchers cannot be overstated. We urge the USDA to ensure that this assistance package provides fair and equitable relief to all family farmers impacted by disruptions in international markets.”last_img read more

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Womens basketball OSU South Carolina matchup will feature two of the best

OSU then-sophomore guard Asia Doss (20) defends during a game against Northwestern on Jan. 28 at the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Lantern file photoOn Nov. 13, 2015, the OSU women’s basketball team opened its 2015-16 season with an 88-80 road loss to the South Carolina Gamecocks. Just over a year later, the Buckeyes will get a chance at revenge.OSU will host the Gamecocks on Monday in a battle between two of college basketball’s best. South Carolina currently sits at No. 4 in the Associated Press Top 25 Poll with the Buckeyes close behind at No. 7.“We know we’re going to be in for a real battle,” OSU coach Kevin McGuff said.Tipoff in Columbus will serve as the season opener for the Gamecocks. In its only exhibition match on Nov. 6, South Carolina downed Benedict College by a score of 120-49.A season ago, the Gamecocks went 33-2 with an 11-0 record on the road. The team’s only loss in the regular season came to the eventual-champion UConn Huskies at home, snapping South Carolina’s perfect 22-0 record. The Gamecocks also fell 80-72 to Syracuse in the Sweet 16 of the NCAA tournament to end its season.South Carolina has lost seven players from last year’s team. Guards Khadijah Sessions, Tina Roy and Tiffany Mitchell, and forwards Sarah Imovbioh and Asia Dozier have graduated, and forwards Jatarie White and India Farmer have departed from the program as well.With the losses, South Carolina lost 37.7 points per game on offense, good for 47.9 percent of the team’s scoring a season ago.Despite the roster turnover, the Gamecocks still possess plenty of talent. Two of South Carolina’s top-three scorers from a season ago have returned. Junior forward A’ja Wilson led the team in scoring at 16.1 points per game and senior center Alaina Coates contributed 12.1 points and a team-high 10.3 rebounds per game.Three ESPN top-100 prospects have joined as true freshman. 5-foot-10 point guard Tyasha Harris (No. 28), 5-foot-6 point guard Araion Bradshaw (No. 33) and 6-foot-2 forward Mikiah Harrigan (No. 72) will join 5-foot-8 guard Victoria Patrick to form the Gamecocks’ talented new class.Former Kentucky forward Alexis Jennings, who put up 10 points and 7.1 rebounds per game for the Wildcats in 2015-16, has transferred into the program and will sit out the entirety of the 2016-17 season.“They have an absolutely loaded roster with talent,” McGuff said. “I have great respect for them.”The Buckeyes have no shortage of talent on its roster, either, and this year’s team figures to be in a more favorable position than a year ago.“We’ve got a little more depth,” McGuff said. “We’ve got a little more size and physicality around the basket.”In last season’s matchup between the two teams, the Buckeyes got 36 points from then-sophomore guard Kelsey Mitchell and 23 from then-senior guard Ameryst Alston. The rest of the team combined for just 21 points.The main difference in the contest was the play of the bigs. Wilson led the Gamecocks with 20 points and 14 rebounds and Coates added 17 points and 13 boards. OSU got just eight points out of its forwards and center, but the group did grab 33 rebounds.The Buckeyes will now be able to balance the Gamecocks’ post play with the addition of redshirt junior forward Stephanie Mavunga, who put up 15 points and 14 rebounds in OSU’s season opener against Duquesne.OSU looked like a much better all-around team against Duquesne than they did in its exhibition win over Ashland, but Mavunga knows the team must be even better to compete with South Carolina.“We need to still get better defensively and get better with rebounding,” Mavunga said. “We need to communicate a little bit more, but I think we’re headed towards the right direction.”The matchup itself is something that McGuff believes is a positive for women’s college basketball.“It’s a great opportunity and it’s great for our game,” McGuff said. “There needs to be more games like this in women’s basketball in November just to create some excitement.”Tipoff is set for 6:00 p.m. on Monday at Value City Arena. read more

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Shipping up to Boston Ohio State advances to Sweet 16

PITTSBURGH – Ohio State men’s basketball coach Thad Matta said Friday that his team’s focus was on surviving and advancing in the NCAA Tournament, and that’s exactly what it did against Gonzaga.  The Buckeyes (29-7) will play in a third consecutive Sweet 16 after defeating No. 7-seed Gonzaga, 73-66, in a third-round NCAA Tournament East Region game Saturday at CONSOL Energy Center in Pittsburgh.  The OSU sophomore tandem of guard Aaron Craft and forward Deshaun Thomas pulled the Buckeyes out of a first-half rut and scored 17 and 18 points, respectively. It was sophomore big man Jared Sullinger, who finished the game with 18 points, that put the game away in the closing moments. Sullinger helped sink Gonzaga after the Bulldogs fought back to tie the game, 61-61, with fewer than four minutes to play. Sullinger dumped six points on the Bulldogs in the final minute of play, including a lay-in against Gonzaga’s 7-foot senior center, Robert Sacre. Senior guard William Buford and sophomore guard Lenzelle Smith Jr., combined for five free-throws to help put the game on ice and advance the Buckeyes.  OSU will play the winner of No. 6-seed Cincinnati and No. 3-seed Florida State in Boston, Mass., in the Sweet 16. The Bearcats, one of four teams from the state of Ohio to advance to the tournament’s third round, is scheduled to tip their game against the Seminoles Sunday at 9:40 p.m., in Nashville, Tenn. In the early moments, OSU’s scoring came via the 3-point shot, with Sullinger hitting each of his first attempts while Buford nailed his first. Craft hit another 3-pointer to help OSU tie the game, 12-12.  OSU fell behind in a back-and-forth affair and trailed Gonzaga, 24-20, 10:12 into the game. The Bulldogs put their size to use and owned the paint, collecting four offensive rebounds to that point and outscoring OSU, 14-2.  Sacre laid a basket home as he was fouled with 7:58 to play. He converted the free-throw to make the score 27-20. Through his first 35 games of the season, Craft averaged nine points per game. Against Gonzaga, Craft matched his average by the 3:36 mark in the first half. The nine points were only good enough keep the Buckeyes’ deficit at 32-27.  A partisan CONSOL Energy Center crowd was backing the Buckeyes, and a surge late in the half by Thomas brought those fans to life. Thomas did all of his first-half scoring in the final 5:01 of the half, but the 12 points he deposited helped OSU claim a 37-37 tie. A lay-in by Craft in the closing seconds put the finishing touch on a 10-3 run that put the Buckeyes up, 39-37, heading into the locker room. Both teams shot a high percentage from the field by halftime – OSU shot 62 percent on 16-of-26 from the field while Gonzaga connected on 14-of-31 attempts for 45 percent.  Craft continued his offensive surge with six points before the first media timeout in the second half. Sullinger stole an in-bound pass and heaved the ball up-court to Craft who finished at the hoop and was fouled.  Craft hit the free-throw attempt to follow, putting OSU up, 46-39, with fewer than 16 minutes to play.  Sullinger was assessed his third foul with 14:43 to play, and was exchanged by Matta for junior forward Evan Ravenel. OSU’s offense was rolling with Sullinger, though. Thomas deposited a 3-pointer just before Sullinger’s exit from the game, and Buford hit one immediately after to put OSU up, 52-42. The lead was the biggest of the game for the Buckeyes to that point, and Gonzaga coach Mark Few called a timeout as fans donning Scarlet and Gray rose to their feet.  To that point, OSU had shot 47 percent from 3-point territory, connecting on 8-of-17 attempts.  Then OSU went cold.  Gonzaga cut into the lead by the 7:24 mark of the second half, and trailed, 58-54. After moving to within four points, Sacre, who finished with eight points, came back on defense and called Bulldogs fans to make noise.  Minutes later, Gonzaga pulled to within two points and forced Matta to call a timeout with 5:48 to play. By the 3:58 mark, the game was tied. Neutral fans in the crowd turned and began to support the mid-major program from Spokane, Wash., which posted 25 wins in the regular season and West Coast Conference Tournament. The Bulldogs also dismantled West Virginia on Thursday, 77-54, to advance to the third round.  Then OSU turned to Sullinger to ice the game.  Sullinger’s six points, plus the free-throws from Buford, Thomas and Smith, finally put the game out of reach and sent the Buckeyes through to the next round of the tournament.  Start time for OSU’s Thursday game in Boston has not been announced. read more

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