PNO Media scheme credits alts, active management for investment gains

first_imgThe non-mandatory industry-wide scheme had hedged three quarters of its listed securities denominated in US and Hong Kong dollars, sterling and yen. It also fully hedged its fixed income investments in developed markets and US dollar-denominated emerging market debt. PNO Media, the Dutch pension fund for the creative sector, gained 2% last year after its alternatives holdings and allocations to European and US large cap equities outperformed.In its annual report for 2018, the €6.3bn scheme said the return exceeded its benchmark by 0.5 percentage points.However, the result was fully offset by a 2% loss incurred on its currency hedge, as the US dollar appreciated 4.8% relative to the euro.The scheme’s overall result of 0.1% was due to a 32% interest rate hedging position, PNO said. PNO Media caters for people working in the Dutch media and creative sectorsSeveral other Dutch schemes have recently revealed the negative impacts of their currency hedge positions over the course of 2018, including medical consultants’ scheme SPMS, Achmea’s company scheme, construction sector fund BpfBouw and corporate scheme Philips Pensioenfonds.Mixed equity performancePNO Media reported a 3.9% loss on its equity portfolio, but this amounted to an outperformance of 2.8 percentage points.The pension fund credited the result in particular to actively managed long-term investments in European and US large caps, which returned 2.2%.It added that the large caps portfolio had consistently outperformed its benchmark by approximately 2 percentage points since its inception in 2005.In contrast, the pension fund lost 17.6% on European small caps, in stark contrast to the allocation’s 23.4% gain in 2017.Alternatives holdings gained 14.3%, with infrastructure and non-listed real estate producing 13.4% and 13.6%, respectively.Private equity delivered 15.7%, the scheme reported, adding that the asset class had outperformed listed equity by 6.7 percentage points on average over the past 10 years.The scheme’s annual report showed that its fixed income portfolio generated a profit of 2.4%, largely due to long-duration euro-denominated government bonds, which improved by 6.1%.European investment grade credit lost 1.2%, while Dutch residential mortgages gained 1.2%.Separately, PNO Media said it had introduced a new defined contribution lifecycle plan, following its ambition to keep on growing in order to remain healthy and independent.It said its aim was for participants to purchase a pension from PNO at retirement, which would enable the scheme to invest in listed markets for longer during the accrual phase, increasing the chances of higher benefits.However, the new pension arrangements were a major contributor to an increase in pension provision costs by €70 to €306 per participant.PNO Media said it spent 71 bps on asset management and transactions combined. At June-end, the pension fund’s coverage ratio stood at 103.5%.last_img read more

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Red Bluff boys soccer tie, girls lose to West Valley

first_imgRed Bluff >> The Red Bluff Spartans boys soccer team played to a tie Wednesday and the girls team to a 1-0 loss against the West Valley Eagles.The boys were on the road at Redding Soccer Park and got out to a 2-1 lead in the first half of play, but gave up the same margin in the second half to tie 3-3.The girls hosted the Eagles and gave up a goal in the second half after a scoreless first half to take the loss.The boys team (7-2-1) is scheduled to take on the Shasta Wolves (6-3) in Redding …last_img read more

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INTRODUCING THE 2018 CINEPLEX ENTERTAINMENT FILM PROGRAM RESIDENTS

first_imgMurry Peeters“Identity & subverting expectations.”Murry Peeters is an actor and screenwriter. Her screen credits include guest starring on NBC’s Taken, as well as lending her voice to beloved characters in Far Cry 5 and My Little Pony. One of the 2018 recipients of theMagee TV Diverse Screenwriters Award, Peeters and her past acting experience enable her to write material populated by richly diverse and layered characters. She is currently in development on two feature films, Black White Blue and Woman Meets Girl. Isa Benn“I can no longer do without filling stories. I need my stories free and frank, forceful and wrought with the healing pitch of timelessness.”An award-winning screenwriter, playwright, filmmaker and multi-media/disciplinary creator, Isa Benn is a first-generation Torontonian of African and Caribbean descent. Her stylistically introspective work deals predominantly with experiential culturalism, colour, class, sexuality, spirituality, “alternative” history, gender, mutiny and magical realism. Currently, Benn is in development on two features, the dark comedy, Two Girl Act Play, and the fantasy/drama/comedy, Catch Red Bird, Hit Red Wall. The CFC is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year, which also means the 30th anniversary of the Cineplex Entertainment Film Program – our longest running and signature film program. At its core, this program champions original voices, entrepreneurism and collaboration.Throughout its 30 years, the program has helped launch and/or accelerate the careers of hundreds of remarkable directors, producers, writers and editors, and has developed and packaged a significant number of projects, many of which go on to receive awards and critical acclaim, including recent features Never Steady, Never Still; Mary Goes Round; Closet Monster and Un Traductor.We are excited to welcome 19 new Cineplex Entertainment Film Program residents into the 2018 program on Monday, July 16, 2018. This incoming group of filmmakers represents an incredibly exciting mix of diverse voices, viewpoints and perspectives. Their previous work includes visual art installations, acting, blogging, poetry, documentaries, music videos, commercials, theatre, sketch comedy, webseries, short films and features. What’s more – for the first time ever, the residents of the Cineplex Entertainment Film Program will be comprised of predominantly female talent; 13 out of the 19 residents are women. Learn more about the Cineplex Entertainment Film Program HERE.By Cory Angeletti-Szasz | CFC “We are extremely moved and inspired by this year’s talent,” shared Kathryn Emslie, CFC’s Chief Programs Officer. “The stories they’re tackling traverse the world and range from the fantastical to magical realist, from the absurd and existential to dark comedies and social realism – they’re about love, family, identity, loss, community, displacement, race, gender and sexual politics. What a rich and exciting sandbox they’ll be working in this year.”Read more about this year’s Cineplex Entertainment Film Program residents below.DIRECTORSMEET OUR FIVE 2018 DIRECTORS’ LAB RESIDENTS AND LEARN WHAT IS AT THE HEART OF THE STORIES THEY’RE CURRENTLY DRAWN TO: Danny Sedore“Matt Johnson’s ‘The Dirties’, with its scrappy shooting style and effortless blending of comedy and suspense, inspired me to create unapologetically bold films.”Danny Sedore has produced countless music videos, commercials and short films. He has established connections and lasting relationships with directors, directors of photography, and other experienced producers at various levels in the Canadian film industry. Sedore has a demonstrated ability to approach any project with a focus on the artistry, while improving efficiency and reducing costs. Working at POV 3rd Street, he is passionate about collaborating with and supporting the stories of marginalized communities onscreen. Twitter Julia Rowland“I am exploring the beauty and fragility of life; how to piece your life back together when it gets sidetracked, and how to build a place for yourself in this world.”Julia Rowland is an award-winning writer, director and producer. Her short films have appeared at various film festivals internationally, and recently she was selected to participate in the inaugural IndieVue Female Film Festival. Passionate about inclusive storytelling and creative collaboration, Rowland has also worked as a producer for various television and commercial production companies, and her writing has appeared in Toronto Life, Reel Honey, and other online and print publications. Karen Chapman“I’m drawn to the after – after the dramatic event, after the loss –how everything shifts, how people are transformed, their choices, the beauty in resilience.”Born to Guyanese parents, award-winning filmmaker Karen Chapman has screened her work everywhere from subway displays, airplanes and hospital lounges to international festivals, classrooms, living rooms and mobile devices. A graduate of Emily Carr University, she is also an alumna of the Banff Centre and a Hot Docs/Documentary Channel Channel Doc Accelerator Fellow. In 2017, Chapman was named one of CBC’s “great Canadian filmmakers of the future.” Julia Hart“I find myself telling a lot of female-driven stories. At the heart of all stories I have explored, there is always hope and a bit of humour, even when the characters feel alienated or menaced by those around them.”Julia Hart is a writer/director who began her film career working for Stephen Fry at Sprout Pictures in the U.K. Her first short film as a director, Emma, Change The Locks, premiered at the Raindance Film Festival in 2015 and won a New Talent Award at the British Film Institute’s 10th BFI Future Film Festival in 2017. Hart’s work has screened at festivals around the world, including the Toronto International Film Festival. She is currently developing her first feature, The One Hundred Nights of Hero, based on the acclaimed graphic novel of the same title by Isabel Greenberg. Ben Allan“I would love to have cut ‘Magnolia.’ Some great performances and a challenge to shorten such a tightly woven story into a more digestible film.”Ben Allan is an editor originally from Hertfordshire, U.K. and currently based in Toronto. With more than 10 years of experience, he began by editing small documentaries for BBC News. Since then, Allan has assisted on The Magic School Bus Reboot, edited episodes of Fraud Squad on Discovery Channel Canada, and cut more than 20 Much Fact music videos. He has also edited seven shorts and two feature films, including Bigfoot and the Burtons, which was seen in 13 countries and recently premiered on Showtime. Advertisement PRODUCERSWHICH FILM(S) OR TV SHOW(S) HAS/HAVE GREATLY INFLUENCED OUR INCOMING PRODUCERS’ LAB RESIDENTS’ SENSE OF STORYTELLING? FIND OUT BELOW: Lee Walker“Terrence Malick’s The ‘Thin Red Line.’ Not only would I love to have cut the incredible battle scenes, but the pacing and rhythm was perfectly matched with the raw emotion of this film.”Lee Walker has more than a decade of editing experience in scripted and unscripted television, shorts, webseries and promos. Working between Vancouver and Toronto, Walker’s work has aired on the CBC, NBC, HGTV, City TV and YTV. She edited three seasons of the History TV series Yukon Gold and recently assisted on the AMC series Into The Badlands at Take 5 Productions. A graduate of Ryerson University’s Film Studies Program, Walker is also a member of the Directors Guild of Canada and an associate member of the Canadian Cinema Editors. Orlee Buium“’Fight Club.’ I loved how the editing kept the audience in the dark about what was really going on in the story, mirroring the psyche of the main character.”Orlee Buium is a Toronto-based film editor who balances her love of film with her passion for the outdoors. She completed a BFA in Film Production and Screenwriting at York University, where she edited several short films, one of which won a CCE Student Merit Award. Since graduating, Buium has worked as an assistant editor on feature films and television series, and as an editor on various short films, commercials, and behind-the-scenes content. The 2018 Cineplex Entertainment Film Program Residents. Directors (L to R): Kim Albright, Joseph Amenta, Isa Benn, Karen Chapman, Julia Hart. Writers (L to R): Brooke Banning, Laurel Brady, Sina Gilani, Murry Peeters, Julia Rowland. Producers (L to R): Evren Boisjoli, Samantha Kaine, Elizabeth Melanson, Alexandra Roberts, Danny Sedore. Editors (L to R): Ben Allan, Orlee Buium, Christopher John Malanchen, Lee Walker. Christopher John Malanchen“’The Departed’ – my favourite part is the opening sequence; the editing and music really set the tone while bringing all the main players into the fold.”Christopher John Malanchen is a film, television and web editor, and a graduate of the Alberta College of Art and Design (BFA) and Sheridan College (Advanced Television and Film Program). Since 2006, he has been making films and working professionally as an editor, including for Bitchin’ Kitchen (Cooking Channel), Million Dollar Genius (History Channel), and the award-winning independent documentary, The Weekend Sailor. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Alexandra Roberts“I was raised on ‘I Love Lucy.’ It allowed me to move through the world with the assumption that female characters could be fearless, hilarious, challenging, and frankly – anything they want.”Alexandra Roberts is a Toronto-based producer specializing in ambitious and forward-thinking television, film and documentary content. She received her BA in Cultural Studies from McGill University and an MA in Media Studies from The New School in New York. Roberts cut her teeth in the industry working on the first season of VICE’s Emmy-winning newsmagazine series for HBO, and since then, her work has aired globally on networks such as Al Jazeera English, A&E, VICELAND and CGTN. Elizabeth Melanson“I have been inspired by Shonda Rhimes’ success in creating compelling stories that captivate the audience, with strong female characters, in ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ and ‘Scandal.’”Elizabeth Melanson is an actor and producer, and a graduate of the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts. In 2013, she co-founded the production company, The Mini Films, with Mouna Traoré. Their first short film, All of Me, was selected by CBC’s Canadian Reflections in 2015, and their second film, Adorn, won Best Narrative Short at the 2016 Montreal International Black Film Festival. Melanson was also the assistant production manager on Mary Goes Round and the production coordinator on Firecrackers. Login/Register With: Laurel Brady“I am endlessly exploring how characters react to loss and disaster because then my writing can ride the line between heartbreaking and hilarious, yet still feel truthful.”Laurel Brady is a Toronto-based screenwriter, playwright and performer. She studied theatre at York University, screenwriting at George Brown College, and sketch writing at Second City Toronto. Brady has written and produced two short films, Pop the Question and Billable Hours, and her plays have been featured onstage at Theatre Passe Muraille, The London Fringe and various theatres across Ontario. She is also the recipient of the Theatre Creators Reserve Grant, by recommendation of Theatre Passe Muraille. Samantha Kaine“JS Baca’s raw, poetic depiction of his cultural truths in ‘Blood In Blood Out’; my first influence into how I intertwine cultural truths in my storytelling.”Samantha Kaine is a film, television and theatre producer, writer and actor. Her producer credits include Offbeat Roads (2013), a television series with Blue Ant Media that has sold internationally; the Toronto mainstage theatrical play Sheets (2017), by Salvatore Antonio; and two short films, Willing to Lie (2017) and The Women of Alpine Road (2017). Kaine is currently in development on her first feature film and a webseries, and she is a strong advocate for unique, boundary-breaking stories that empower women. Kim Albright“I’m drawn to stories which subvert the familiar and everyday, and force audiences ask themselves those ‘what if?’ questions about their daily lives.”Kim Albright is an award-winning Canadian-British-Filipino director. Her shorts, Dragonfly, Edward’s Turmoil, Albatross and The Purple Plain, were all supported by Film London and the British Film Institute (BFI). Her films have won awards and competed at festivals worldwide, including Encounters Film Festival, British Independent Film Festival, Oscar-qualifying Atlanta Film Festival and the BFI London Film Festival. Albright has been featured on BFI’s Upshot Program, which showcases “the most exciting emerging U.K. filmmaking talent.” Sina Gilani“Me, myth, mother and metaphor. I’d say these are the major themes inspiring my current body of work.”An award-winning Iranian-Canadian actor/writer at home in Toronto via Tehran, Sina Gilani started his journey as an audience member and a volunteer before pursuing his passion professionally. Invited to the National Theatre School as a guest playwright in 2009, he then trained at Humber College and York University. A poet himself, Gilani finds his work is often inspired by world mythology, classical texts and folklore stories. He is an alumnus of the Buddies in Bad Times Emerging Creators Unit (2013-2014) and a playwright member of the Soulpepper Academy (2016-2018). Evren Boisjoli“’La Haine’; strong in storytelling as it included the director’s personal interests while also discussing current issues without forgetting its chief goal of entertainment!”Evren Boisjoli is a film producer, executive and entrepreneur. He is the founder and CEO of Achromatic Media Inc. and a founder of post-production house, Outpost. His filmography includes titles such as Fauve (Sundance Special Jury Prize, 2018) and We’re Still Together (Karlovy Vary, 2016). Boisjoli holds a Bachelor’s degree in Film Production from the renowned Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema. Brooke Banning“My work features female leads who, consciously or unconsciously, dismantle the toxic myths and value systems underlying contemporary life.”Brooke Banning is a Toronto-based screenwriter and playwright. Some of her theatre credits include Wolf Sounds (The Box Toronto), Swell Broad (Storefront Theatre) and Joyful Noise (Helen Gardiner Phelan Playhouse), as well as film credits The Return and The Brooke Banning Show. She has also presented at Cahoots Lift Off! Festival and the 2014 Accessing the Arts Symposium. Banning engages with and prioritizes abilities in the arts, and is one of the founders of ActingWorks, a conservatory-style acting program for individuals with special needs. Advertisement EDITORSWE ASKED OUR FOUR INCOMING EDITORS’ LAB RESIDENTS WHICH NOTABLE FILM THEY WOULD HAVE LOVED TO EDIT AND WHY. CHECK OUT THEIR ANSWERS AND BIOS BELOW: Facebook Advertisement WRITERSGET TO KNOW OUR FIVE INCOMING WRITERS’ LAB RESIDENTS AND WHAT MAJOR THEMES ARE INSPIRING THEIR CURRENT BODY OF WORK AS WRITERS: Joseph Amenta“I wish to diversify the characters and stories we see in film through authentic representation of women, LGBTQ, and people of colour.”Since graduating with honours from Ryerson University’s Schools of Image Arts’ Film Studies Program in 2013, Joseph Amenta has written, directed and produced three short films. His first two shorts, Wild Youthand Cherry Cola, have both screened at festivals internationally, with the latter premiering at the Vancouver International Film Festival (2017) and screening at the Inside Out Film Festival (2018) in Toronto. Amenta’s most recent short, Haus, was fully funded by the Canada Council for the Arts, and will begin its festival run in June 2018.last_img read more

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IT CHAPTER 2 Has Started Production and James McAvoy Shares a Photo

first_img Twitter Advertisement Facebook Login/Register With: Director Andy Muschietti has officially started production on the highly anticipated film IT: Chapter 2. James McAvoy shared a photo having fun with a little Derry related pun which you can see below.The movie is shooting in Toronto and the sequel has a great cast that includes James McAvoy as Bill, Jessica Chastain as Beverly, Bill Hader as Richie, Jay Ryan (Beauty and the Beast) as Ben, James Ransone (Generation Kill) as Eddie, with Andy Bean (Here and Now) as Stanely Uris, Isaiah Mustafa as Mike, and then there’s creepy Bill Skarsgård as the Pennywise the Clown.The original young cast will also return for the sequel for some flashback scenes. They include Jaeden Lieberher, Jeremy Ray Taylor, Sophia Lillis, Finn Wolfhard, Wyatt Oleff, Chosen Jacobs, Jack Dylan Grazer and Nicholas Hamilton. Advertisement Advertisement The sequel is set 27 years after the Losers Club defeated Pennywise The Clown when they were kids. As they’ve grown up, they’ve forgotten about what had happened. When bad things start to happen in Derry again and kids begin to go missing, Mike Hanlon, who stayed behind in Derry to keep watch over the town, calls up his old friends and reminds them of the promise they made to come back and stop it if it ever came back.The movie is set to be released on September 6th, 2019. I loved the first film and I can’t wait for this sequel. I’m curious to see how Muschietti handles it. He has said in the past that it will be even scarier and more intense than the first one, so that’s something to look forward to!It has previously been revealed that Chapter 2 will include more of the interdimensional turtle, which was teased in the first film a few times. It will also have a much darker tone to it, and it has been said that Mike Hanlon’s character will be drastically changed, as he will be a junkie. You can read more about that here.The sequel will also most likely explore Pennywise the Clown a little more. We’ve heard that the sequel may include elements from Pennywise’s history in Derry such as the story behind The Black Spot and there was a deleted scene from the first film that was revealed that included Pennywise eating a baby. That could be included in the sequel as well if they really do plan on giving us a history of the monster. Then Bill Skarsgard hopes that it will explore the twisted mind of Pennywise.by Joey Paur | Geek Tyrant LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

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UConn And Notre Dame Could Renew The Best Rivalry In Womens Basketball

Maryland and South Carolina have really good women’s basketball teams — two of the four best in the country. But Connecticut and Notre Dame, their respective Final Four opponents on Sunday in Tampa, are a cut above. They’re ranked No. 1 and 2 in the country by the AP, the coaches and the tournament selection committee. They’re the favorites to reach Tuesday’s final in our March Madness predictions and in Vegas. They played each other in last year’s final. And, best of all, they have a rich history — one that isn’t as one-sided as UConn’s recent dominance suggests.Notre Dame has dealt UConn seven of its 18 losses since the start of 2007. In other words, 39 percent of the time UConn has lost in the last eight-plus years, it’s been against Notre Dame.If UConn and Notre Dame play each other in the final, it’d be their 21st meeting since the start of 2007 — the latest ESPN Stats & Info data available. They played 12 regular-season games (11 back when both were in the Big East), plus three Big East conference finals and one semifinal. They’ve also met four times in the last eight Final Fours, with two wins apiece. A Tuesday meeting would be the rubber match.Maryland and South Carolina have been good, but they simply haven’t been as dominant. UConn has won 94.6 percent of its games since the start of 2007, by far the best in the sport. Notre Dame ranks fifth, at 84.1 percent. (Stanford, Green Bay and Baylor are second, third and fourth.) Maryland is 11th, at 80.6 percent. And South Carolina is 53rd, at 64.3 percent. But South Carolina’s and Maryland’s relative inconsistency, coupled with UConn’s and Notre Dame’s late, lamented conference rivalry, means they have a much thinner record against the rest of the Final Four.So let’s look more closely at the UConn-Notre Dame rivalry. UConn has won 13 of their last 20 matchups, or 65 percent. That’s as close as UConn gets these days to a balanced rivalry — it’s the lowest winning percentage UConn has against any team it has played more than five times since the start of 2007. Every team but one that has played UConn at least once in that time has a losing record against the Huskies. (The one exception is longtime rival Tennessee, which won their only recent meeting.) More than 90 percent of UConn opponents haven’t beaten the Huskies even once, including four teams that have played them at least 10 times.Also notable, for a team that has regularly all but clinched its games by halftime, UConn has beaten Notre Dame by an average of less than eight points per game in their 20 meetings. That’s the closest average margin for any UConn opponent that has played the Huskies more than five times since 2007.UConn, meanwhile, is responsible for a big chunk of Notre Dame’s losses since the start of 2007: 13 of 49, or 27 percent. UConn is the only team Notre Dame has played in more than six games in that period that has a winning record against the Fighting Irish.Notre Dame’s recent wins against UConn all came in an astonishingly short spell: The Fighting Irish won seven of eight meetings over a stretch that started with Notre Dame’s upset of UConn in the 2011 Final Four. Notre Dame star Jewell Loyd, a junior and the team’s leading scorer, is the only current player who was a major contributor for the Fighting Irish when they last beat UConn.It’s not the most heated or longstanding rivalry. Before the teams played in December — in a game UConn won by 18 points — espnW’s Graham Hays pointed out that it doesn’t have the rich character and tension of UConn-Tennessee. Notre Dame head coach Muffet McGraw, asked before the game about her relationship with Connecticut coach Geno Auriemma, made it sound like the two were friendly acquaintances in the corporate world. “Geno and I are terrific,” McGraw said. “We saw each other this summer. We’ve got no issues, no problems. Just business as usual for both of us.”If it’s business as usual for both teams on Sunday, we’ll see them renew their acquaintance in the final on Tuesday in Tampa, in the latest edition of the closest thing to a rivalry that Auriemma’s dominant UConn team has these days. read more

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Ohio State mens basketball grinds out overtime victory over Akron in NIT

OSU freshman guard JaQuan Lyle (13) scans the floor during a Big Ten tournament game against Penn State on March 10 in Indianapolis.Credit: Samantha Hollingshead | Photo EditorThe Ohio State men’s basketball team took just over 40 minutes to find a sliver of rhythm against the Akron Zips in the first round of the National Invitational Tournament.After a back-and-forth physical battle riddled with sloppy play and field-goal percentages hovering around a meager 30, the five minutes allotted in overtime was the narrow time window the Buckeyes needed to advance in postseason play.OSU held the Zips to just one point in the extra period, while redshirt sophomore guard Kam Williams led the offensive charge over the course of the second half and overtime. The Buckeyes’ focus during the extra period pushed the team into the second round of the NIT with a 72-63 victory at the Schottenstein Center.“They were very competitive, and it was a game down to the wire where I felt like we showed a little bit of growth,” said OSU junior forward Marc Loving. “I felt like at times this season we might’ve lost that game.”Loving, who recorded the sixth double-double of his career, was one of three Buckeyes who finished with 18 points on the night. Williams added 18 points as well as five rebounds, while freshman guard JaQuan Lyle also registered a double-double with 18 points and 14 rebounds.“We felt like there was a lot of room for us to play our style of basketball,” Lyle said. “We really didn’t have much pace on offense, and we really weren’t disrupting them on the defensive side as much as we wanted to.”Lyle’s comments were primarily true to the first half of the game. The team’s six lowest-scoring halves this season all occurred during the first 20 minutes of gameplay, with one of those periods taking place against Akron on Tuesday.While OSU struggled early on to close out possessions down low and outside, the Buckeye bigs constantly challenged the boards to keep Akron within striking distance, totaling 57 rebounds. The problem was with following through and finishing.The two teams combined to begin the game shooting 2-of-14 from the field, but the Buckeyes eventually pushed through the lethargic start to find their momentum later on in the contest.“We were a little bit shaky at the beginning, and I thought we did a pretty decent job of playing through that,” said OSU coach Thad Matta.However, despite collecting 18 offensive boards as a team, the Buckeyes only managed to muster up 12 second-chance points, two fewer than the Zips. In a postseason game in which neither team led by more than single digits, missing multiple scoring opportunities during a single possession usually spells out defeat.Heading into halftime with a 29-25 deficit, there was very little room for error on either side.OSU struggled to break the 20-point threshold throughout the course of the first half, but some minor halftime adjustments led to the Buckeyes outscoring Akron by 13 points over the final 25 minutes of the contest.“I thought they did a great job of closing the game out,” Matta said.With just over two minutes left in the second half, Lyle came up with arguably the game’s most important two-way play. After a 3-pointer by Akron senior forward Reggie McAdams put the Zips up by two points with just under three minutes left in regulation, Lyle stole the ball from senior guard Jake Kretzer and took it down to the other end to tie the game.“To have something like that disappear from your lineup that fast, the next man has to step up, and we all had to contribute in a different way,” Loving said.Despite falling short to the Buckeyes, Akron’s night consisted of a trifecta of effective players. The sharpshooting abilities of McAdams and Kretzer helped to combine for seven converted threes.Although the Zips shot just over 21 percent from beyond the arc, Akron junior center Isaiah Johnson added a more physical presence to the team’s contrasting perimeter play. Johnson tallied 16 points and 12 rebounds on the night, but that was not enough to offset the team’s uncharacteristic struggles from beyond the arc.“If you would’ve told me we would shoot 9-of-42 from three with the shots we got, I would tell you I’d be surprised,” said Akron coach Keith Dambrot. “That probably was a determining factor.”Even though OSU was sluggish at times, too, Akron’s inability to garner extended momentum might have been trifled by the team’s recent schedule. The Zips competed in their fourth contest in six days Tuesday, but Dambrot was not going to let possible fatigue excuse the team of a loss.Dambrot said after the game he still believes his team had the talent and discipline necessary to knock off a major school like OSU.“I felt like we should’ve won the game,” Dambrot said. “If we play up to our capabilities and they play up to their capabilities, I have enough respect for my team to think we should’ve won the game.”Williams, Matta’s usual sixth man, stepped in as a starter in aid of sophomore forward Keita Bates-Diop, who was held out of Tuesday’s contest with an undisclosed illness. Even though Williams was starting his first collegiate game against the Zips, he did not succumb to the pressure.The Buckeyes are next set to host the Florida Gators on Sunday in the second round of the NIT. Tipoff is slated for noon at the Schottenstein Center. read more

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Shipping up to Boston Ohio State advances to Sweet 16

PITTSBURGH – Ohio State men’s basketball coach Thad Matta said Friday that his team’s focus was on surviving and advancing in the NCAA Tournament, and that’s exactly what it did against Gonzaga.  The Buckeyes (29-7) will play in a third consecutive Sweet 16 after defeating No. 7-seed Gonzaga, 73-66, in a third-round NCAA Tournament East Region game Saturday at CONSOL Energy Center in Pittsburgh.  The OSU sophomore tandem of guard Aaron Craft and forward Deshaun Thomas pulled the Buckeyes out of a first-half rut and scored 17 and 18 points, respectively. It was sophomore big man Jared Sullinger, who finished the game with 18 points, that put the game away in the closing moments. Sullinger helped sink Gonzaga after the Bulldogs fought back to tie the game, 61-61, with fewer than four minutes to play. Sullinger dumped six points on the Bulldogs in the final minute of play, including a lay-in against Gonzaga’s 7-foot senior center, Robert Sacre. Senior guard William Buford and sophomore guard Lenzelle Smith Jr., combined for five free-throws to help put the game on ice and advance the Buckeyes.  OSU will play the winner of No. 6-seed Cincinnati and No. 3-seed Florida State in Boston, Mass., in the Sweet 16. The Bearcats, one of four teams from the state of Ohio to advance to the tournament’s third round, is scheduled to tip their game against the Seminoles Sunday at 9:40 p.m., in Nashville, Tenn. In the early moments, OSU’s scoring came via the 3-point shot, with Sullinger hitting each of his first attempts while Buford nailed his first. Craft hit another 3-pointer to help OSU tie the game, 12-12.  OSU fell behind in a back-and-forth affair and trailed Gonzaga, 24-20, 10:12 into the game. The Bulldogs put their size to use and owned the paint, collecting four offensive rebounds to that point and outscoring OSU, 14-2.  Sacre laid a basket home as he was fouled with 7:58 to play. He converted the free-throw to make the score 27-20. Through his first 35 games of the season, Craft averaged nine points per game. Against Gonzaga, Craft matched his average by the 3:36 mark in the first half. The nine points were only good enough keep the Buckeyes’ deficit at 32-27.  A partisan CONSOL Energy Center crowd was backing the Buckeyes, and a surge late in the half by Thomas brought those fans to life. Thomas did all of his first-half scoring in the final 5:01 of the half, but the 12 points he deposited helped OSU claim a 37-37 tie. A lay-in by Craft in the closing seconds put the finishing touch on a 10-3 run that put the Buckeyes up, 39-37, heading into the locker room. Both teams shot a high percentage from the field by halftime – OSU shot 62 percent on 16-of-26 from the field while Gonzaga connected on 14-of-31 attempts for 45 percent.  Craft continued his offensive surge with six points before the first media timeout in the second half. Sullinger stole an in-bound pass and heaved the ball up-court to Craft who finished at the hoop and was fouled.  Craft hit the free-throw attempt to follow, putting OSU up, 46-39, with fewer than 16 minutes to play.  Sullinger was assessed his third foul with 14:43 to play, and was exchanged by Matta for junior forward Evan Ravenel. OSU’s offense was rolling with Sullinger, though. Thomas deposited a 3-pointer just before Sullinger’s exit from the game, and Buford hit one immediately after to put OSU up, 52-42. The lead was the biggest of the game for the Buckeyes to that point, and Gonzaga coach Mark Few called a timeout as fans donning Scarlet and Gray rose to their feet.  To that point, OSU had shot 47 percent from 3-point territory, connecting on 8-of-17 attempts.  Then OSU went cold.  Gonzaga cut into the lead by the 7:24 mark of the second half, and trailed, 58-54. After moving to within four points, Sacre, who finished with eight points, came back on defense and called Bulldogs fans to make noise.  Minutes later, Gonzaga pulled to within two points and forced Matta to call a timeout with 5:48 to play. By the 3:58 mark, the game was tied. Neutral fans in the crowd turned and began to support the mid-major program from Spokane, Wash., which posted 25 wins in the regular season and West Coast Conference Tournament. The Bulldogs also dismantled West Virginia on Thursday, 77-54, to advance to the third round.  Then OSU turned to Sullinger to ice the game.  Sullinger’s six points, plus the free-throws from Buford, Thomas and Smith, finally put the game out of reach and sent the Buckeyes through to the next round of the tournament.  Start time for OSU’s Thursday game in Boston has not been announced. read more

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Dejan Lovren out for up to 3 weeks says Klopp

first_imgLiverpool manager Jurgen Klopp has announced that defender Dejan Lovren will likely be absent for up to three weeks due to a pelvic problemThe Croatia international has managed the injury for over the past year, which saw him make a total of 43 appearances across all competitions for Liverpool.And, as well as helping the Reds reach the Champions League final and secure a second successive top-four finish, Lovren was a key part of the Croatia squad that reached the World Cup final for the first time in the nation’s history.Due to all of this, Lovren will now need some extra time off in order to properly overcome his long-standing issue.Roberto Firmino, LiverpoolVirgil van Dijk praises Roberto Firmino after Liverpool’s win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Virgil van Dijk hailed team-mate Roberto Firmino after coming off the bench to inspire Liverpool to a 3-1 comeback win against Newcastle United.“He is not fit. Let me say it like this, last year he already had a few problems with that but he could obviously play – and played really good,” said Klopp on the club website.“Recovery days were always enough then it was not a problem and he was in the next session again. We did not train a lot in the end of the season, of course, because we were more or less constantly playing, but he played constantly.“Now in the World Cup, [playing] three times [for] 120 minutes it got a bit worse, but I am pretty sure it will settle in the next one, two or three weeks. In that time he can probably for sure train already, but not the full programme, so that will then take time.”Even without Lovren though, Liverpool still managed to get their Premier League campaign off to a strong start by thrashing West Ham United 4-0 at Anfield on Sunday.last_img read more

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Lifeguards rescue two men trapped inside cave near Point Loma

first_img KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom Lifeguards rescue two men trapped inside cave near Point Loma Posted: September 6, 2019 Updated: 4:26 PMcenter_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Two people were rescued Friday morning after their fishing boat became stuck on in a cave near Point Loma and Sunset Cliffs.Lifeguards got a mayday call just before 2 a.m. saying the 26-foot catamaran was unable to get out of the cave. It took crews around an hour to find the cave, which was near the Point Loma Wastewater Treatment Plant.Lifeguard Lt. Rich Stropsky said border customs agents were first to the scene and the coast guard also assisted them with a helicopter lighting up the area so lifeguards could see.The lifeguards jumped into the surf and had to swim out to the vessel and bring the victims back the rescue boat. Both men were uninjured.The men were asleep inside a 26-foot-catamaran, which was on auto- pilot mode, as they returned from a fishing trip near Coronado Island when they woke up around midnight and realized the surf was pushing their boat into a cave.The coast guard hopes to tow the boat sometime during the day. September 6, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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