Dominican Navy Protects Coasts with “Amphibious Shield”

first_imgBy Dialogo February 12, 2015 To protect those maritime regions, the Navy deployed the Coast Guard Cutter Canopus GC-107 and the interceptor go-fast boats Polaris LI-162 and Dubhe LI-164 to the Southern Naval Zone, while the mid-sized patrol vessel Capotillo PM-204 and the Cutter Procion GC-103 were deployed to the Northern Naval Zone. During the first two weeks of the operation, the Navy captured 14 suspects, including eight Haitians and six Dominicans. The Office of the Chief of Staff for the Dominican Navy launched Amphibious Shield on January 18 by deploying three cutters and two interceptor go-fast boats to the northern and southern coasts. Naval vessels deployed to northern and southern coasts Other drug interdictions at sea Dismantling organized crime groups which prey on the country’s natural resources through illegal activities is one of the initiative’s goals. The operation will also target organized crime groups which engage in an array of illegal activities, including human trafficking, arms smuggling, and the illicit transport of contraband, such as untaxed cigarettes. The Dominican Navy launched “Amphibious Shield,” a security operation to combat drug trafficking and illegal fishing in the northern and southern regions of the country. Other drug interdictions at sea Even before Amphibious Shield was launched, the Dominican Navy and other security forces had made a number of large drug seizures in recent years. For example, some fishermen are pillaging thousands of small fish, Captain Daniel Eduardo de la Rosa told Dominican daily El Día. Illegal fishing is one of the activities Amphibious Shield is designed to stop. The Navy is also protecting natural resources such as the semi-precious stone amber, which is a tourist attraction along the country’s northern coast. During the first two weeks of the operation, the Navy captured 14 suspects, including eight Haitians and six Dominicans. For example, some fishermen are pillaging thousands of small fish, Captain Daniel Eduardo de la Rosa told Dominican daily El Día. Illegal fishing is one of the activities Amphibious Shield is designed to stop. The Navy and the DNCD made the bust off the coast of Boca Chica, where security forces converged on a boat while three men were seen throwing drugs overboard. “In spite of the institutional strength of the government of the Dominican Republic, an increase in drug abuse and trafficking in recent years in the Dominican Republic has occurred, due to its geographical location and the island’s many ports, where this sort of criminal groups can exert a great deal of influence over criminal activities,” he said. In addition to protecting the marine environment, Amphibious Shield will crack down on drug trafficking in Dominican coastal waters. The island nation’s location in the Caribbean makes both coasts attractive to organized crime groups, according to Wilfredo Lozano, director of the Center for Research and Social Studies at the Ibero-American University of the Dominican Republic. Drug enforcement agents intercepted one of the boats and seized 10 packets of cocaine. Law enforcement authorities said they believed the drug traffickers had tossed at least 800 kilograms of cocaine overboard before security forces interdicted the boat. The Navy is also protecting natural resources such as the semi-precious stone amber, which is a tourist attraction along the country’s northern coast. In addition to protecting the marine environment, Amphibious Shield will crack down on drug trafficking in Dominican coastal waters. Drug enforcement agents intercepted one of the boats and seized 10 packets of cocaine. Law enforcement authorities said they believed the drug traffickers had tossed at least 800 kilograms of cocaine overboard before security forces interdicted the boat. Since December, the Navy has interdicted three vessels involved in illegal fishing. The island nation’s location in the Caribbean makes both coasts attractive to organized crime groups, according to Wilfredo Lozano, director of the Center for Research and Social Studies at the Ibero-American University of the Dominican Republic. For example, in April 2013, the Navy worked in cooperation with the Dominican Republic’s National Directorate for Drug Control (DNCD) to seize 279 kilograms of cocaine and arrest two suspects, officials said. The Office of the Chief of Staff for the Dominican Navy launched Amphibious Shield on January 18 by deploying three cutters and two interceptor go-fast boats to the northern and southern coasts. “They are members of a drug trafficking network that imports cocaine from Colombia,” the DNCD said in a press release. This is interesting & good work acknowledged that has been going on love the professionalism that has been carried out …keep up the good work The Haitian nationals were allegedly fishing illegally aboard three shops off the coast of Montecrist in Dominican waters. And the six Dominicans were caught on the coasts of Samaná and Sabana de la Mar as they attempted to travel illegally to Puerto Rico. The Haitian nationals were allegedly fishing illegally aboard three shops off the coast of Montecrist in Dominican waters. And the six Dominicans were caught on the coasts of Samaná and Sabana de la Mar as they attempted to travel illegally to Puerto Rico. Even before Amphibious Shield was launched, the Dominican Navy and other security forces had made a number of large drug seizures in recent years. Naval vessels deployed to northern and southern coasts The Navy protects the marine environment Illegal activity also threatens biodiversity in the northern and southern coastal regions. To protect those maritime regions, the Navy deployed the Coast Guard Cutter Canopus GC-107 and the interceptor go-fast boats Polaris LI-162 and Dubhe LI-164 to the Southern Naval Zone, while the mid-sized patrol vessel Capotillo PM-204 and the Cutter Procion GC-103 were deployed to the Northern Naval Zone. Illegal activity also threatens biodiversity in the northern and southern coastal regions. The Navy protects the marine environment In another operation, in December 2012, drug enforcement agents dismantled a narco-trafficking organization that was using go-fast boats to transport drugs into the country near the city of Baní, west of Santo Domingo. Dismantling organized crime groups which prey on the country’s natural resources through illegal activities is one of the initiative’s goals. The operation will also target organized crime groups which engage in an array of illegal activities, including human trafficking, arms smuggling, and the illicit transport of contraband, such as untaxed cigarettes. The Dominican Navy launched “Amphibious Shield,” a security operation to combat drug trafficking and illegal fishing in the northern and southern regions of the country. “They are members of a drug trafficking network that imports cocaine from Colombia,” the DNCD said in a press release. For example, in April 2013, the Navy worked in cooperation with the Dominican Republic’s National Directorate for Drug Control (DNCD) to seize 279 kilograms of cocaine and arrest two suspects, officials said. The Navy and the DNCD made the bust off the coast of Boca Chica, where security forces converged on a boat while three men were seen throwing drugs overboard. In another operation, in December 2012, drug enforcement agents dismantled a narco-trafficking organization that was using go-fast boats to transport drugs into the country near the city of Baní, west of Santo Domingo. Since December, the Navy has interdicted three vessels involved in illegal fishing. “In spite of the institutional strength of the government of the Dominican Republic, an increase in drug abuse and trafficking in recent years in the Dominican Republic has occurred, due to its geographical location and the island’s many ports, where this sort of criminal groups can exert a great deal of influence over criminal activities,” he said. last_img read more

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Leaders: What are YOU willing to share?

first_imgLeadership is sharing. A leader shares.That’s my response whenever anyone asks me to sum up leadership in as few words as possible. Think about it…Unless you’re a genuine hermit (and probably even then) you need other people. As a leader, you are completely dependent on other people, particularly the people you serve––the people who trust in your leadership.Your performance is measured by the performance of the people you serve. Your effectiveness is determined by how effective they are. Their productivity is the measure of your success.Leadership is about power––if we define it properly. Power is your ability or capacity to act or perform effectively. To the point––power is your ability to get things done. No matter what your position of authority or leadership status, you are only as powerful as the people you serve. Their capacity to act or perform effectively is the most direct determining factor in your effectiveness as a leader. Why do we make it so complicated? It’s painfully simple: You become more powerful by empowering others––and that means sharing. Your power as a leader grows in direct proportion to what you’re willing to share with others. One of the most, well, empowering parts of our workshops can also be one of the most difficult. It’s when we ask these simple questions:What are you willing to share as a leader?How will you do it?The focus of THE SENSEI LEADER MOVEMENT is to help leaders Inspire, Empower and Guide people to their very best. Think about these three key purposes of a leader and how each demands sharing:Inspire: Share your enthusiasm. Share yourself as a model and example for others. Share your vision and your mission. Share your passion. Share respect, trust and loyalty.Empower: Share actual power––and authority. Share responsibility. Share the resources necessary to help others develop to their full capacity and expand their potential. Share encouragement and credit for success.Guide: Share your Self. Share your time. Share your knowledge, experience and wisdom. Be the teacher/leader embodied in the ideal of THE SENSEI LEADER. Don’t stop here! This is a list of only the most essential things you need to share to be an effective leader––someone with the ability to attract willing followers and engage them in a common cause. What more can you share?It’s no longer a matter of whether or not you should adopt this sharing philosophy. It’s only a matter of how. Of course you have to weave these responsibilities in with your managerial duties, planning and the other trappings of leadership. And there are self-empowering benefits of sharing too, particularly in adopting our core value of leadership through teaching, coaching and mentoring. A recent Harvard Business Review article by Daniel Dobrygowski is right on point:“The teacher-leader, by continually growing and teaching her own team, paves the way for her own success.”The article is appropriately titled: “Great Employees Want to Learn. Great Managers Know How to Teach.”Teaching and mentoring are powerful expressions of sharing, but they’re not the only ones. Studies have proven for years that the simple act of sharing personal time and interest on the part of a leader has a significant impact on the people he or she serves. Take some time for self-reflection and ask yourself the two questions I posed earlier:What are you willing to share as a leader?How will you do it?Once you determine how you can and will share, embed these practices as disciplines in your daily life as leader. Hold always to the truth that your success as a leader grows in direct proportion to what you’re willing to share with others. And if you want a constant reminder, just post these words where you’ll see them every day:Leadership is sharing. A leader shares.  5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jim Bouchard “THE SENSEI LEADER is not just another leadership development program. It is a movement.”Our programs support this movement and help us fulfill our vision and mission…                                                                     Vision: To promote … Web: TheSenseiLeader.com Detailslast_img read more

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Demolition of ‘erring’ structures in Boracay to continue – BIARMG

first_imgState Solicitor II Sheila Marie Sisonand Senior State Solicitor Cecil Soto, however, said the government is workingon a timeline set for by the Office of the President and that the urgency to finallycorrect the violations at the Bulabog area is most needed to fulfill thatmission. KALIBO, Aklan – The demolition of the10 structures will proceed as the appeal to hold it in abeyance was not grantedboth by the Court and the local government of Malay. The structures, which were found bythe Boracay Inter-Agency Rehabilitation Management Group (BIARMG) not compliantwith the easement law, were demolished starting on Friday last week shortlyafter the Temporary Restraining Order issued by Judge Ronald Exmundo in favorof the protesting business owners expired on Nov. 5.        Meanwhile, Natividad Bernardino,general manager of the BIARMG which is the implementing arm of the President’stask force, said she cannot agree on the proposed gentleman’s agreement“because in the first place it’s ungentlemanly not to follow the law.” The Boracay Inter-Agency Rehabilitation Management Group demolished “erring” structures after the expiration of the 20-day Temporary Restraining Order issued by Judge Ronald Exmundo of the Kalibo Regional Trial Court Branch 7 last week. NOEL CABOBOS/RADYOTODO/88.5FM/PN “We are now 80 percent complete and weare duty bound to finish on April next year which is the timeframes set for bythe task force under the orders of the president,” said Bernardino.(With a report from NoelCabobos/RadyoTodo/88.5FM/PN) During the hearing for the Writ ofPreliminary Injunction at the Regional Trial Court Branch 7 yesterday, LawyerSalvador Paolo Panelo Jr. said he was “shaken” by the task force’s insistenceto continue with the demolition although “it grossly violated the rights of thepeople involved,” referring to the owners of the 10 structures which were thesubject of the government’s demolition order.   Over the weekend, an urgent request topostpone the implementation of the demolition was sent to the office of Malaymayor Frolibar Bautista. “If this case drags on, this willbecome a bad precedence to other destinations that need major uplift and repairto make them sustainable tourism destinations,” she added while citing El Nidoand Coron in Palawan as well as Panglao in Bohol and Siargao in Surigao DelNorte. “We have to show the government’sresolve in establishing order in Boracay and we have been fair enough in theenforcement of regulations here. Of the 52 non-compliant in the Bulabog area,there are still 10 who refused to self-demolish the part of their structurethat is covered by the 30-meter easement so it’s no longer our fault if weimplement the law,” she added. The mayor, however, has not grantedthe appeal since yesterday afternoon. Exmundo, meanwhile, ruled to give allthe parties five days to file all the necessary pleadings after which the case,he said, will be submitted for resolution. Bernardino said Boracay Island servesas the model of the President in restructuring a damaged tourism destination. Panelo appealed for a gentleman’sagreement by asking the lawyers representing the Office of the SolicitorGeneral to momentarily put the demolition on hold while the Court is stillhearing the injunction case. “Yes, this is a big tragedy especiallyfor my clients pero hindi kami susukopara humanap ng ibang paraan,” Panelo said.last_img read more

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REPORT: 1 of 2 CO school shooters transgender, minor girl identifying as boy

first_imgPolice in Colorado are releasing the latest information on the school shooting that occurred Tuesday near Denver.An 18-year-old male student was killed, eight others were injured, and two suspects are in custody in the shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch.Both suspects, 18-year-old Devon Erickson, and an unidentified 17-year-old female were students at the school, according to police.Several reports say the second suspect is a transgender who was in the process of transitioning from female to male.One of the suspects is expected to be in court, Wednesday afternoon.Police are currently investigating and conducting a search Erickson’s home and his car.Erickson nor his unidentified accomplice had previous criminal records or contact with the police as unlike Parkland, Florida, shooting suspect Nikolas Cruz, according to reports.An official motive for has not been established at this time police are reportedly unsure if bullying played a role.This story is developing.last_img read more

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Hasselbaink plays down play-off prospects

first_imgEmbed from Getty ImagesJimmy Floyd Hasselbaink has played down the prospect of QPR competing for a play-off place following their win against Bristol City.Tuesday’s 1-0 victory left Rangers ninth in the Championship table, just one point away from the top six.Hasselbaink’s side, who travel to Sheffield Wednesday this weekend, are unbeaten in five matches.Asked if the play-offs is a realistic aim, manager Hasselbaink said: “We want to be there. But at this moment in time the most important thing is to accumulate as many points as we can.“Saturday is another big game. Can we bring that same kind of determination to that game?“We need to try to get as many points as possible and then see at the beginning of next year where we are.”Rangers will assess Jordan Cousins and Joel Lynch ahead of Saturday’s game after both players limped off against City.Click here for the latest QPR transfer gossipClick here for today’s QPR quiz See also:Sylla’s goal gives QPR victoryBristol City boss bemoans ‘disgraceful’ decisionHasselbaink hails QPR’s persistence after deserved winQPR v Bristol City player ratingsQPR hopeful on Cousins injuryQPR fans on Twitter praise midfield duoLuongo ‘has got the lot’ – Hasselbaink  Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x Drink This Before Bed, Watch Your Body Fat Melt Like Crazy x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Talking trade with Darci Vetter

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Darci Vetter   A conversation with…Ambassador Darci Vetter, who served as the chief agriculture negotiator for the office of the U.S. Trade Representative in the Obama Administration who spoke at the recent National Institute for Animal Agriculture meeting in Columbus OCJ: Agriculture is really dependent on trade, even more-so than we often realize. What are some of the key things we need to understand?Darci: U.S. agriculture is very heavily dependent on trade, not only because we produce more than we consume, so we have to find customers elsewhere, but also because we use those markets to add value to our products. We send things that might not be valuable here. Some of our variety meats or our lower quality cuts we can send abroad and have them be profit centers instead of something that costs more money for us to dispose of or find a use for in the U.S. We use foreign markets to create and find the best opportunity to sell all the different things we are good at producing, whether that’s plant or animal product. We have gotten pretty good at doing it and one of the reasons we are so good at it and that we have these strong trade agreements with other countries. OCJ: As you just pointed out, it isn’t always necessarily government against government all the time in these trade negotiations, when you get down to it it really is about a farmer producing for a consumer and we need to reemphasize that on what is going on at the governmental levels, right?Darci: That is absolutely right, we have very strong relationships with our customers in Mexico and vice versa here and that’s been built over time. We’ve had NAFTA in place for more than 20 years along with that framework of trade between us. They can be challenged but hopefully not broken overnight. I think those are things we want to remember and to keep intact and to tell our stories on both sides of the border about the importance of the agriculture economy for both of us. OCJ: Another trade issue that’s been at the top of mind is the Trans Pacific Partnership that you worked on, but that the Trump Administration quickly pulled out of at least partly due to concerns that it was multi-lateral. President Trump seems to favor more bi-lateral agreements. What are your thoughts on that strategy moving forward?Darci: I think there was some concern of that because it was a negotiation among 12 parties that somehow to get all 12 to reach agreement you would have to go with the lowest common denominator. There was concern that the TPP might not reach the highest standard or create as complete a market opening as you would otherwise and mostly we heard examples of that on the manufacturing side. I am not really sure that was the dynamic that had a play in agriculture or even a play across the board because I think it can be true that you choose a group of countries who all have a commitment to a very ambitious agreement and you use them to push each other and to add value for the agreement. So in agriculture, if you just look at the countries that are there, you have two different types of opportunities. You had expanded access into Canada and Japan which are high income, high value markets and pretty mature markets, but also two countries that in their past agreements had refused to put agricultural products on the table. That changed. We said to be part of this group and get access to 12 other countries at once, you have to be all in. Every country has to open every product and so for the first time, we got expanded access to Canada’s poultry and ag market, something we didn’t get in NAFTA. And Japan, who in the past when negotiating free-trade agreements with countries said, “We have these six sacred products and we just don’t touch them.” Japan would never talk about rice, dairy, sugar, pork and beef — all of them were on the table in TPP and we got access to all of them. Japan and Canada were willing to do that because they not only got access to new markets, but they also got access to these real powerhouses of growth. The TPP included Vietnam and Malaysia, countries in southeast Asia who have this rapidly growing middle class who are able to buy all sorts of other products, ag and non ag, and for the U.S, as incomes rises in those countries, they start buying more of things we already send them such as feed grain, skim milk powder and basic products. Then they start demanding all of these value added products. Our meat, our poultry, our dairy, more fresh fruits and vegetables as they improve their nutrition.Through TPP we had the opportunity to get in on the ground floor when they were just starting to buy those products and form those consumer relationships that are so important that they would look to the U.S. to get those products. Without TPP in place, we face a real competitive disadvantage into those markets because they already have the ASEAN free trade agreement that will give them zero tariffs on products like dairy and wine where we excel instead coming from New Zealand and Australia. Japan and Australia have already signed a bi-lateral free trade agreement. The tariffs on beef from Australia are now more than 10% with percentage points lower that what the Japanese pay on beef coming from the U.S. Our cattleman say it’s costing them $400,000 in lost sales a day to the Japanese market, our top market for beef, so it is important that whatever approach we use, bi-lateral or multi-lateral agreement that we can get back into the game and we have a strategy. That’s so important for us. OCJ: You clearly spent quite a bit of time working on the TPP and to see it pitched out the window, that has to be somewhat frustrating.Darci: It’s hugely disappointing, because it was a very complex negotiation because you had to get 12 countries all rowing in the same direction but also because this agreement had almost unanimous support from the agriculture sector. It is disappointing to hear rhetoric about trade that I think undervalues the good it can generate throughout the ag supply chain and how much it does for rural economies. Part of the reason I love working in ag trade is because both agriculture and trade policy have traditionally been bipartisan and so you get to form all sorts of coalitions that might not be possible in other places, and we really saw that in assistance I got from industry and Congress and elsewhere in negotiating the TPP.I believe that the TPP model isn’t going away and one of the things we really tried to do in TPP was try to make it a more transparent negotiating process, and so the text of that entire agreement — every tariff in its schedule for being reduced to zero, every rule that was written in that agreement — has been publicly available since 2015 so people saw what we achieved. While it may not go into force with precisely those countries on the timeline that we thought, I think it will influence how countries negotiate with each other. In fact, in this renegotiation of the NAFTA, we Wilbur Ross, U.S Secretary of Commerce, saying we should look really hard at the TPP text for how we might modernize NAFTA, how we might bring in labor and environment provisions into the agreement, how we might update our intellectual property standards, how we think about disciplining state-owned enterprises and things like that to modernize an agreement that is now 23 years old. It will have ripple effects somewhere, somehow so I don’t think it is going away, but obviously I would have loved to see it be ratified right away. OCJ: Clearly there are some negotiating strategies that have been promoted by the Trump Administration that will apply to trade moving forward, what are your thoughts on some of the pros and cons of the new strategies we are seeing?Darci: I think you have to keep in mind with trade negotiations and when you are negotiating with people that you want to make your core partners, these are people you are going to have to deal with every day. Negotiating is step one and then there is implementation and countries have to make real changes to implement these agreements to their tariff schedules, to their regulations. This is a long term relationship. I think sometimes folks point to Donald Trump’s book, “The art of the deal,” where you start with the really hard core position, throw them off their balance and you wind up closer to the goal you wanted and you don’t have to go so far to the middle. I think that’s great, if you are buying a building or a car and the deal is over once the deal has been made. The whole point of a trade agreement is to bring our economies closer together and to spend more time “hanging out” once its over. Really engaging and understanding involves not just what the other side is asking for, but why they are asking for it and where they want to see that relationship be in the years ahead. That is pretty critical to getting a good trade deal that allows all the sectors of our economy to participate. OCJ: Why is it so important for Ohio’s farm community to share their stories with regard to these trade issues?Darci: I think sharing that story is vastly more powerful coming from the mouths of farmers and ranchers from Ohio than it is from me. Farmers and ranchers can talk about the decisions that they make and the options that they have to provide for their families, to sell their products, to add value to what they do in a way that I just cannot.last_img read more

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Pehlu case: activists seek probe on police inaction

first_imgAfter Chief Minister Ashok Gehlot’s promise to file an appeal against the acquittals in the Pehlu Khan lynching case, civil rights groups in Rajasthan have urged the State government to register cases of criminal negligence against the police officials, including the Investigating Officers, whose “faulty investigation” had led to the court acquitting the six accused for lack of evidence.People’s Union for Civil Liberties – Rajasthan president Kavita Srivastava said the Home Department, besides filing an appeal in the High Court, should ensure a court-monitored reinvestigation and retrial in the case. “This judgement will only end up emboldening those who take law in their hands, like the so-called cow vigilantes, who will now carry out targeted attacks on Muslims with impunity,” said Prem Krishna Sharma, a High Court lawyer and PUCL member.last_img read more

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SLB Reports Increase in Applications for Discounted Interest Rate Loans

first_img This move is part of the SLB’s undertaking to incentivise students’ selection of courses regarded as priority programmes, rather than those commonly chosen by their peers, which are reportedly often oversubscribed. The Students’ Loan Bureau (SLB) is reporting a 47 per cent increase in loan applications for tertiary courses, for which the interest rate on repayments is significantly discounted. Executive Director, Monica Brown, told a recent JIS Think Tank, which was held at the Agency’s head office in Kingston, that the areas include agriculture studies, engineering, information technology, and maritime and logistics studies, for which the interest rate has decreased to six per cent since the start of the 2017/18 academic year. Story Highlights The Students’ Loan Bureau (SLB) is reporting a 47 per cent increase in loan applications for tertiary courses, for which the interest rate on repayments is significantly discounted.Executive Director, Monica Brown, told a recent JIS Think Tank, which was held at the Agency’s head office in Kingston, that the areas include agriculture studies, engineering, information technology, and maritime and logistics studies, for which the interest rate has decreased to six per cent since the start of the 2017/18 academic year.She advised that all loans applications submitted, to date, have been approved.This move is part of the SLB’s undertaking to incentivise students’ selection of courses regarded as priority programmes, rather than those commonly chosen by their peers, which are reportedly often oversubscribed.State Minister in the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information, Hon. Floyd Green, also encourages students to adequately research the status of courses in order to make the right choices.Mr. Green, who also addressed the Think Tank, noted that students pursuing programmes commonly chosen by their peers tend to encounter challenges securing employment after completing their studies.“It’s not just about doing what you feel like doing when you decide to pursue tertiary education… but you will have to see it as an ability to enable a better way of living. Therefore, I am imploring students to research the areas that are not saturated, (as) there are others not being pursued and need much more people,” he said.Meanwhile, Policy Analyst at the Jamaica Tertiary Education Commission (JTEC), Tracey-Ann Smith, said the JTEC will be embarking on several activities aimed at assisting students in making their choices.As part of its public education efforts, JTEC has staged a series of road shows with high-school students, explaining some of the affiliated costs for tertiary education. Additionally, they have established a programme tuition fee database on their website.According to Mrs. Smith, this database has a collation of over 200 degree programmes from various institutions, detailing the costs and comparing them by institutions, so that students may get the best value for money. The Commission has also distributed the findings from its annual survey of tertiary institutions looking at enrolment figures, retention and graduation rates, the number and types of degrees awarded, financial assistance to students, and areas of sustainable and strategic planning.“The JTEC’s mandate is to examine the cost of tertiary education as well as to look at the rate of return on investment. We are encouraging students to do proper planning and research as they prepare to pursue tertiary education,” Mrs. Smith said.last_img read more

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