Killing of jogger highlights dangerous reality for women

first_imgGeorgetown Running Club(WASHINGTON) — The viral hashtags #MilesforMollie and #dcrunners4wendy are reflecting an all-too-scary reality for women today.Runners in the Washington, D.C., area started #dcrunners4wendy after Wendy Martinez, 35 and newly-engaged, was stabbed to death Tuesday while jogging around 8 p.m. in a busy, well-lit area of the nation’s capital.Mollie Tibbetts, the inspiration behind #MilesforMollie, was found dead on Aug. 21, more than a month after she went missing during an evening jog in Brooklyn, Iowa.The killings of two young women while doing something as innocent as running outdoors have sparked fear and outrage.“It’s the unfortunate reality of being a woman,” said Alex Morris, a 24-year-old runner in Washington, D.C., and member of the Georgetown Running Club, a competitive running club. “You always have to think extra carefully and it’s not even just running.”The deaths of Tibbetts and Martinez came on the heels of two killings last year that also rocked women.Karina Vetrano, 30, was killed while on an evening jog in Queens, New York, in August 2016.Five days later, Vanessa Marcotte, a 27-year-old Google employee who lived in New York City, was killed after she left her mother’s home in Princeton, Massachusetts, for a run in broad daylight, officials said.It’s not just women runners who are in danger. Just this week, a 22-year-old collegiate golf player was killed while she was golfing alone on a course in Ames, Iowa.A conversation that men don’t haveAnd lost among those high-profile, tragic killings are the countless instances the mass public rarely hears about of women who escape attacks, who are cat-called, who are scared, who have to run with pepper spray or alter their routes or skip an activity altogether just because they are trying to exist in this world as a woman on her own.“We have a big group chat and we’re always talking about how people can be safe and that we should be meeting up more often to go on runs because strength in numbers just makes everyone feel safer,” Morris said of her running club. “It’s just a topic of conversation that the men’s team doesn’t have to talk about.”A survey last year by Runner’s World found more than half of women who run said they are concerned that they could be physically assaulted or receive unwanted physical contact during a run.In addition to the fear they face, women also face pressure from society to do something (“Don’t wear headphones!” “Change your route!” “Never run at night!”), as though the behaviors of often-male perpetrators are their fault.“I’ve felt frustrated when the media coverage after these incidents focuses on what women should be doing differently with the subtext that they did something wrong, or that they shouldn’t have been running at that time,” said Kerry Allen, a 30-year-old elite marathoner and Georgetown Running Club member. “At the end of the day, we have to get to a place that every woman feels safe while moving about the city, whether it’s walking, running, biking, anything.”Allen, who also works full-time on Capitol Hill, said she often has to run early in the morning or late at night, a reality of many women who have to squeeze in workouts wherever and whenever they can.“I think the unfortunate answer is you can’t always prevent attacks,” she said. “I love running. I’m going to keep doing that.”A self-defense expert’s advice for womenIt is impossible to prevent every attack, experts say, and women should not feel the pressure to do so.What women can do is empower themselves so they feel stronger and more confident out in the world, says Jennifer Cassetta, a self-defense expert and creator of the Stilettos and Self Defense DVDs.“I’m personally not going to wait around for men to stop raping,” Cassetta told “Good Morning America.” “That’s not going to happen in our lifetime so how can we get ahead of that and be empowered to do what we want to do and live our lives.”“It’s about knowing that you have that power,” she said.Cassetta stays away from the stereotypical advice for women like not running alone and not wearing headphones, she adds.“A man would say that,” she said.Instead, she gives women self-defense advice that doesn’t “punish” them.“For me, teaching is about giving as many choices as possible in these horrible situations,” said Cassetta, who notes that even taking one self-defense class can make a huge difference. “There are so many examples of women fighting back and getting away. It does work. Not all the time, but it can.”Cassetta’s top 3 empowering tips for women1. Know the weapons you have on your body and how to use themRun or walk powerfully with your shoulders back and head up, making eye contact with every person in your path, Cassetta recommends.If you are attacked, dropping down to a squat or a lunge will drop your center of gravity and make you harder to the throw to the ground, according to Cassetta.To fight back, Cassetta says to “acquire and fire.”“The eyes, throat and groin are most effective targets because they are all soft targets where you can do the most amount of damage with the least amount of effort,” she said. “Scratch or gouge the eyes, give a punch to the throat to disrupt breathing and give a punch or a knee or an elbow to the groin.”2. Be aware of your surroundingsWomen should be “alert but calm” when they’re out and about, scanning for red flags and not getting too deep into thought, Cassetta says.“When we’re being alert, our intuition is our inner GPS, it gives us signals and sends us messages,” she said. “If we’re too caught up in our to-do list or what we’re stressed about, we can’t hear it.”When it comes to hearing, Cassetta also says don’t forgo headphones, but do have the volume low enough so that you can hear the sounds around you.Also, let other people know of your surroundings too. Designate a friend or family member as your “safety buddy,” the person you text to let know when and where you are running and when you will return.3. Arm yourselfThe types of “non-lethal weapons” Cassetta recommends women arm themselves with include pepper spray, a personal alarm, and a sharp object worn as a piece of jewelry, what she calls “weapon jewelry.”“They make you that much more aware because you’re holding onto it and aware of it,” she said. “But you need to make sure you know how to use them. If you have pepper spray, make sure you know how to use it and have it accessible.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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The Rise of the #T-MOOC (Twitter MOOC) – India HR Chat | India HR Chat

first_img “Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have gained tremendous popularity over the last couple of years. The New York Times dubbed 2012 -‘The Year of the MOOC,’ and it has since become one of the hottest topics in education. “Read full article Previous Article Next Article The Rise of the #T-MOOC (Twitter MOOC) – India HR Chat | India HR ChatShared from missc on 16 Apr 2015 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed.last_img read more

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Clinical Assistant Professor

first_imgAbout the University of Georgia Contract TypeAcademic (9 mo.) Position Summary Classification TitleClinical Assistant Professor This program is a first of its kind partnership between theFranklin College and the Grady College of Journalism and MassCommunication. Franklin College also invites applications for atenure-track Assistant Professor position for this program.Interested candidates are encouraged to apply to both positions.Review of candidates will begin on January 15, 2021, andapplications submitted by January 15, 2021 will receive fullconsideration. Applicants should include a curriculum vitae andcover letter describing their academic qualifications andprofessional experience, showing how they will add value to theprogram. Furthermore, they should show how their teaching, serviceand work has supported the success of students from racial, ethnicand gender backgrounds that are underrepresented in the film andentertainment industries. Applicants who may not yet have had thatexperience should explain how their work will further the College’scommitment to diversity. Contact information for three referencesshould also be provided.Address questions to:Professor Neil LandauGrady College Search Committee Chair and Associate ProfessorDepartment of Entertainment and Media Studies320 Journalism Building, Peabody SuiteUniversity of GeorgiaAthens, Georgia 30602-3154(706) 542-3785 or [email protected] Franklin and Grady Colleges, their departments, and theUniversity of Georgia are committed to increasing the diversity ofboth faculty and students and sustaining a work and learningenvironment that is inclusive. Women, people of color, LGBTQ+, andpeople with disabilities are encouraged to apply.Applications for both positions must be submitted online throughUGAJobs.Grady College Position:http://www.ugajobsearch.com/postings/176165Franklin College Position:http://www.ugajobsearch.com/postings/176159 The University of Georgia ( UGA ), a land-grant and sea-grantuniversity with statewide commitments and responsibilities is thestate’s oldest, most comprehensive, and most diversifiedinstitution of higher education ( http://www.uga.edu/ ). UGA is currentlyranked among the top 20 public universities in U.S. News &World Report. The University’s main campus is located in Athens,approximately 65 miles northeast of Atlanta, with extended campusesin Atlanta, Griffin, Gwinnett, and Tifton. UGA was founded in 1785by the Georgia General Assembly as the first state-charteredUniversity in the country. UGA employs approximately 1,800full-time instructional faculty and more than 7,600 full-timestaff. The University’s enrollment exceeds 36,000 studentsincluding over 27,500 undergraduates and over 8,500 graduate andprofessional students. Academic programs reside in 17 schools andcolleges, as well as a medical partnership with Augusta Universityhoused on the UGA Health Sciences Campus in Athens. Position Details The Department of Entertainment and Media Studies ( EMST ) togetherwith the Department of Advertising and Public Relations, and theDepartment of Journalism constitutes the units of the GradyCollege. EMST is home to media scholars of varied theoretical andmethodological traditions. It administers the major inEntertainment & Media Studies, which teaches students visualstorytelling focused on entertainment. It also houses the New MediaInstitute, which explores the critical, commercial and creativedimensions of emerging technologies. Find out more athttps://grady.uga.edu/academics/emst/ andhttp://mynmi.net/about/.Augmenting the department programs is the presence of the PeabodyAwards, the oldest and most prestigious awards program thatrecognizes excellence in broadcast and electronic media, nowentering its 80th year. Our MFA FTVDM program positions studentsfor jobs in the entertainment media industry across film,television, gaming and other new media.Learn more about the MFAFTVDM program, our current faculty, mission, and curricula at:mfafilm.uga.eduGeorgia is well known for its quality of life, and for outdoor,urban, cultural and arts activities(http://www.exploregeorgia.org/). DepartmentJournalism Entertainment & Media Studies Faculty RankClinical Assistant Professor Posting Details Physical Demands The successful candidate will have a demonstrated commitment topromoting diversity as evidenced by prior accomplishments. Advertised SalarySalary is competitive. We are seeking individuals with a terminal degree ( MFA or PhD) infilm studies, media studies, communication, or a relateddiscipline, and 5 years of significant industry experience in oneor more of the following areas: producing, writing, directing,and/or post-production for the screen.For more information regarding the non-tenure track clinical ranksplease see the Grady Clinical Guidelines link at:https://provost.uga.edu/_resources/documents/grady_capu_criteria.pdf. The University of Georgia is an Equal Opportunity/AffirmativeAction employer. All qualified applicants will receiveconsideration for employment without regard to race, color,religion, sex, national origin, ethnicity, age, geneticinformation, disability, gender identity, sexual orientation orprotected veteran status. Persons needing accommodations orassistance with the accessibility of materials related to thissearch are encouraged to contact Central HR ([email protected]). Terminal degree appropriate for the discipline Benefits EligibilityBenefits Eligible Working TitleClinical Assistant Professor Open until filledYes Job Posting Date11/20/2020 Be advised a credit check will be required for all positions withfinancial responsibilities. For additional information about thecredit check criteria, visit the UGA Credit Background Check website. Does this position have direct interaction or care of childrenunder the age of 18 or direct patient care?No EEO Statement Effective End Date (for Limited-Term postings) Job Closing Date Additional Requirementscenter_img Minimum Qualifications Does this position have Security Access (e.g., public safety,IT security, personnel records, patient records, or access tochemicals and medications)Yes Is this a Position of Trust?Yes The Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication at theUniversity of Georgia invites applications for a clinical assistantprofessor-of-practice position to begin in August, 2021. Thisindividual will teach in the new Master of Fine Arts program inFilm, Television and Digital Media that launched August 2020 inpartnership with the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences and theGeorgia Film Academy. This is a clinical assistant professorposition. According to UGA faculty ranks, a clinical assistantprofessor is an educator-practitioner, or “professor-of-practice,”with disciplinary expertise who practices their discipline andteaches in a professionalized setting.Grady College recognizes that diversity empowers excellence in ourcore missions of teaching, research and service and that it issupported by actively ensuring underrepresented voices are heardand varied experiences are valued.The college seeks an individual to teach a range of courses onproducing, writing, directing, and/or post-production for thescreen. The position will also include some administrativeresponsibilities. Successful applicants will be able to teach in atleast two of the following areas: screenwriting, directing,post-production, and producing long-form narratives fortraditional, digital, streaming, and/or emerging distributionplatforms. Service on department, college and university committeesis expected, as is mentorship and supervision of MFA thesisprojects. A demonstrated commitment to work with students of allbackgrounds and with students holding a range of worldviews isvalued.This position will primarily involve teaching at the TrilithStudios (formerly Pinewood) satellite campus in Fayetteville,Georgia (20 miles south of the Atlanta airport). Our MFA program inFilm, Television, and Digital Media operates in partnership withthe Georgia Film Academy and the Trilith Studio facilities inFayetteville, GA. Tenure StatusNon-Tenure Track Posting NumberF0767P Underutilization Location of VacancyAtlanta Area Is driving a responsibility of this position?No Anticipated Start Date08/01/2021 Does this position have operation, access, or control offinancial resources?No College/Unit/Department websitegrady.uga.edu Special Instructions to Applicants Is having a P-Card an essential function of this position?No Relevant/Preferred Education, Experience, Licensure, and/orCertification FLSA Duties/ResponsibilitiesPosting Specific QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*).Applicant DocumentsRequired DocumentsResume/CVCover LetterOptional Documents Does this position require a P-Card?No Credit and P-Card policy The successful applicant will have demonstrated accomplishments inone or more of the following areas: producing, writing, directing,and/or post-production for the screen. Employment TypeEmployee Preferred Knowledge, Skills, Abilities and/or Competencies Retirement PlanTRS or ORP Posting TypeExternal About the College/Unit/Departmentlast_img read more

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Journalists investigated

first_imgThe two student journalists who exposed insecurities in the University computer network are facing a police investigation into their activities in obtaining the story. Proctors of the University have told the Deputy Editor and Sports Editor of The Oxford Student, Patrick Foster and Roger Waite, that a police investigation has been initiated at their request, although the journalists have yet to be contacted themselves by Thames Valley Police. In the article, published on Thursday 27 May, Foster and Waite (the named authors of the piece) admit that the methods used to highlight the lack of security “fall foul of both the law and OUCS guidelines”. The Computer Misuse Act 1990, which prevents the use of computers to access personal information such as passwords, and private conversations, carries a custodial sentence of up to six months. Senior sources at The OxStu have informed Cherwell that the Proctors became aware of the article even before it went to press. “A lot of college IT officers were contacted,” they said, “and one of those must have passed on the details of the article. Once the Proctors had contacted us, we passed full details of the article to them straight away.” Within a matter of hours of receiving this information Foster had his Webmail account withdrawn and it is believed the contents are being investigated. Waite’s was removed on Tuesday. This is a matter of some concern for the students, who both have exams at the end of term. Foster has also been denied Ethernet connection to his room at Keble College. The University and their respective colleges are yet to take any action beyond this, although Foster, already on full academic probation, has expressed public fear that he may face a “three-term rustication”. It is unclear how much detail OUSU, the publishers of The OxStu, knew of the matter before they went to press. But our source was adamant that “other than the journalists concerned, neither OUSU, its employees or Editor Mary Morgan knew anything about it until the day of publication.” Waite and Foster, in a statement issued to Cherwell, stood “100 per cent” behind the story. “We are both aware that we consciously breached the law, University statutes and college regulations through our actions. However we feel we were justified in doing so to bring to the attention of the University and its students the very real dangers posed by network insecurities. “We are co-operating fully with the inquiries of the Proctors and our respective colleges. We have nothing to hide, and are both looking forward to meeting the Senior Proctor to make our respective cases.”ARCHIVE: 5th week TT 2004last_img read more

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“READERS FORUM” NOVEMBER 5, 2016

first_imgWHATS ON YOUR MIND TODAY?Todays “READERS POLL” question is: How are you going to vote in this election?Please take time and read our newest feature articles entitled “IU WOMEN’S-MENS SWIM AND DIVING TEAMS”.Also take time to read “BIRTHDAYS, HOT JOBS” and “LOCAL SPORTS” posted in our sections.If you would like to advertise in the CCO please contact us City-County [email protected] County Observer has been serving our community for 15 years.Copyright 2015 City County Observer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistribute.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Hot 8 Brass Band Premieres New Single “Bottom Of The Bucket” From Exciting New Album

first_imgThe Hot 8 Brass Band sure has reason to celebrate! After reaching their 20th anniversary in 2016, the New Orleans brass ensemble continues to push the envelope. The band is set to release a new album, On The Spot, on March 31st, and will support it with a cross-country tour in grandiose fashion.On The Spot is all about the band’s live sound, as it captures the group’s infectious energy like never before. Even the record’s name refers to a truly New Orleans moment, when a band takes a pause from their parade route to perform for those assembled around them. It’s a magical moment of synchronous energy, completely On The Spot, and that magic is bottled up for your own personal enjoyment on the new LP. You can pre-order the new release here.To get a sample of the band’s triumphant efforts, we’re honored to premiere the new track “Bottom Of The Bucket.” The band tells us a little more about the new single.L. Brown, the trombone player, was inspired by trying to get away from our trials and tribulations. It’s like that story about crabs in a bucket, one gets to the top and the others will bring him back down. We were doing everything we could to make it out. Whenever we tried to get up, there was no one to help pull us out. We did it all on our own.We also invited percussion legend Alfred “Uganda” Roberts, to join our forces on the recording. He has played with everyone from Professor Longhair, Dr. John and Allen Toussaint, to The Meters. We are very honored to have Uganda perform here with us.Check out “Bottom Of The Bucket,” streaming below!Check out the Hot 8 Brass Band’s tour schedule below, and head to their website for more information. Pre-orders for On The Spot are available now, and you can find that here.Hot 8 Brass Band Tour Dates2 Mar Solbar, Sunshine Coast, QLD (AUS)3 Mar Tanks Arts Centre, Cairns, QLD (AUS)4 Mar Girrakool Blues Festival & BBQ, Girrakool, NSW (AUS)8 Mar Oxford Art Factory, Sydney, NSW (AUS)9 Mar Badlands, Perth, WA (AUS)10 Mar WOMADelaide, Adelaide, SA (AUS)11 Mar WOMADelaide, Adelaide, SA (AUS)15 Mar Brunswick Music Festival, Melbourne, VIC (AUS)17 Mar WOMAD New Zealand (NZ)18 Mar WOMAD New Zealand (NZ)4 Apr The Roundhouse, London (UK)5 Apr The Quarterhouse, Folkestone (UK)6 Apr Rescue Rooms, Nottingham (UK)7 Apr Invisible Wind Factory, Liverpool (UK)8 Apr Old Granada Studios, Manchester (UK)9 Apr Guild Hall, Preston (UK)11 Apr Liquid Room, Edinburgh (UK)12 Apr O2 ABC, Glasgow (UK)13 Apr The Wardrobe, Leeds (UK)14 Apr O2 Academy, Birmingham (UK)16 Apr Transatlantik Festival, Hamburg (GER)19 Apr Webster Hall Marlin Room, New York, NY (USA)20 Apr Jammin’ Java, Vienna, VA (USA)21 Apr Milkboy, Philadelphia, PA (USA)22 Apr ONCE Ballroom, Somerville, MA (USA)29 Apr Katowice Jazz Art, Katowice (PL)1 May Cheltenham Jazz Festival, Cheltenham (UK)2 May O2 Academy Sheffield, Sheffield (UK)3 May The Fleece, Bristol (UK)4 May Tramshed, Cardiff (UK)5 May The Factory, Barnstaple (UK)8 May Boiler shop, Newcastle (UK)9 May The Welly, Hull (UK)10 May Warwick Arts Centre, Warwick (UK)11 May Pocklington Arts Centre, Pocklington (UK)12 May The Soundcrash Funk & Soul Weekender, Camber Sands (UK)17 May New Morning, Paris (FR)19 May Open Air, Voiron (FR) [EARLY SHOW]19 May Le Fil – Radio Nova Nuit Zébrée, St Etienne (FR) [LATE SHOW]20 May Rush, Rouen (FR)27 May Denver Day of Rock, Denver, CO (USA)30 May The Crocodile, Seattle, WA (USA)31 May Wonder Ballroom, Portland, OR (USA)1 June The Dip, Redding, CA (USA)2 June The Independent, San Francisco, CA (USA)3 June Saint Rocke, Hermosa Beach, CA (USA)4 June House Of Blues San Diego – Voodoo Room, San Diego, CA (USA)7 June Antone’s, Austin, TX (USA)8 June Warehouse Live, Houston, TX (USA)10 June House of Blues, New Orleans, LA (USA) HOMETOWN RECORD RELEASE PARTY[Photo courtesy of Melissa Fargo]last_img read more

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Songs from the stars

first_imgPlato, the Greek philosopher and mathematician, described music and astronomy as “sister sciences” that encompassed harmonious motions, whether of instrument strings or celestial objects. This philosophy of a “Music of the Spheres” was symbolic. However, modern technology is creating a true music of the spheres by transforming astronomical data into unique musical compositions.Gerhard Sonnert, a research associate at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, has created a new website that allows listeners to literally hear the music of the stars. He worked with Wanda Diaz-Merced, a postdoctoral student at the University of Glasgow whose blindness led her into the field of sonification (turning astrophysical data into sound), and with composer Volkmar Studtrucker, who turned the sound into music.“I saw the musical notes on Wanda’s desk and I got inspired,” Sonnert said.Diaz-Merced lost her sight in her early 20s while studying physics. When she visited an astronomy lab and heard the hiss of a signal from a radio telescope, she realized that she might be able to continue doing the science she loved. She now works with a program called xSonify, which allows users to present numerical data as sound and use pitch, volume, or rhythm to distinguish between different data values.During a visit to the Center for Astrophysics in 2011, Diaz-Merced worked with data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. The target was an EX Hydrae — a binary system consisting of a normal star and a white dwarf. Known as a cataclysmic variable, the system fluctuates in X-ray brightness as the white dwarf consumes gas from its companion.Diaz-Merced plugged the Chandra X-ray data into xSonify and converted it into musical notes. The results sound random, but Sonnert sensed that they could become something more pleasing to the ear. He contacted Studtrucker, who chose short passages from the sonified notes, perhaps 70 bars in all, and added harmonies in different musical styles. Sound files that began as atonal compositions transformed into blues jams and jazz ballads, to name just two examples of the nine songs produced.The project shows that something as far away and otherworldly can be significant to humans for two distinct reasons — one scientific and one artistic.“We’re still extracting meaning from data, but in a very different way,” explained Sonnert.You can listen to the results of the project at the Star Songs website.last_img read more

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Visiting poet kicks off series at Saint Mary’s

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Poetry Club hosted Austin Segrest, poetry editor of “The Missouri Review” and the club’s first poet of its inaugural poet speaker series Wednesday. Senior Susan Head, a member of the Poetry Club, introduced Segrest, who was chosen to speak in the series under the guidance of English professor Dionne Bremyer, one of Segrest’s friends who has encouraged students in the Saint Mary’s community to attend literary events and bring more speakers to campus. Segrest, born in Birmingham, Alabama, said he studied classics at Emory University. Head said his poetry is influenced by many of the classical poets, such as Ovid and Virgil, and their use and creation of myth. Segrest said he was also influenced by his study of language, his time studying abroad in Rome, his love of music and dance, and his mother, the subject of most of his elegies. “I’m fascinated by the challenge of how we can approximate what music can do in words while still using sound,” Segrest said. “That whole adventure is endlessly fascinating to me.” Segrest said he felt excited to be at Saint Mary’s, detailing how he believes he is “traveling east to west through his life,” a metaphor coined by poet John Donne. “It is really great to be in a place where I can tell there is such a love and care for the written word, and it’s a real honor for my poetry and my writing to be a part of this.  It really means the world,” Segrest said. Segrest said he has used psychoanalysis to revisit his personal and family past and to investigate the roots from which he sprung and the steps he has taken thus far in life. “My mother died when I was first coming into my own as a writer, so it was very influential on me, and it’s no surprise that it’s something I explored a lot in psychoanalysis,” Segrest said.   “There were just a few confluences that came together in my life, like I had just graduated from Emory University, I was working a research job, and actually living with my mother; I had moved in back home and so I think there were a lot of intersections coming together that then came up in the therapy that followed.” Junior Elizabeth Kenney said she enjoyed Segrest’s reading and liked learning his background. “As a writer, I thought it was really interesting to hear about his techniques and the subjects he chooses to use in his writing,” Kenney said. “I liked the rhythm in his poetry and the honesty and how it sounded just like a conversation.  I think he made an impression on many of the students in attendance, because he was so casual about his poetry but it reached very deep and touched on many topics people could relate to. “I thought his use of classical references were breathtaking, and having studied abroad in Rome, also, I liked making these connections and thinking of what the allusions mean for myself and then within his poems.” Founder of the poetry club, junior Claire Bleecker, said she began the club this year in order to learn more about poetry and to expose herself and other students to more types of this art. “We were excited to have Segrest come to Saint Mary’s, because I think it’s so important for young writers to know that becoming a poet is a plausible thing,” Bleecker said. “Poets aren’t just these mythological creatures but very genuine and kind people.” Contact Kelly Konya at [email protected]last_img read more

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Austria shuts down country’s last coal-fired power plant

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享PV Magazine:Austria’s largest power provider, Verbund, shut down the Mellach district heating plant in the state of Styria on Friday. The shutdown marked the end of coal-fired power generation in Austria because the district heating plant was the last operational coal-fired unit in the country. For 34 years, the power plant produced more than 30 billion kWh of electricity and 20 billion kWh of district heating. In the future, it will be kept ready for back-up, according to Verbund.“The closure of the last coal-fired power plant is a historic step: Austria is finally getting out of coal power supply and is taking another step towards phasing out fossil fuels,” said Austrian Minister for Climate Protection Leonore Gewessler, noting that the government wants to switch to a 100% power supply based on renewable energies by 2030. “This also gives us economic independence: We are currently spending €10 billion on imports of coal, oil and gas.”Verbund will now develop Mellach into an innovation hub. A pilot plant for high-temperature electrolysis and fuel cell operation for hydrogen production has already been set up. Large-scale battery storage systems are also being tested for use as buffer storage, for example in ultrafast charging stations for electro-mobility at the site, Verbund emphasized.According to Austrian PV association Photovoltaic Austria, the country still has “a very intensive road” to travel. “Because Austria still produces a quarter of its electricity from fossil fuels. For a sustainable power supply, natural resources have to be used much more,” Managing Director Vera Immitzer told PV magazine.The country’s installed PV capacity must be increased tenfold over the next 10 years in order to achieve the 100% green electricity target by 2030. According to “Europe Beyond Coal” surveys, 15 European countries have already decided to phase out coal-based electricity generation, and 14 of them want to exit coal by 2030.[Sandra Enkhardt]More: Austria’s last coal power plant shuts down Austria shuts down country’s last coal-fired power plantlast_img read more

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Friendsgiving

first_imgMy husband and I received the most unusual and intriguing dinner invitation this weekend. We received a text from friends here in town that said we were invited to their annual FRIENDSGIVING dinner on Saturday night. We were told to bring nothing but ourselves, be casual and be there by 7pm.Our friends have three grown / growing girls: one in high school, one in college and the third graduated from college and lives out of town. Apparently, a number of years ago the daughters all agreed that after they had spent Thursday with family, eating turkey and scarfing down pies, they wanted to have a relaxed evening with their friends – relaxing, in fellowship, enjoying one another. And so Friendsgiving began.Rather than rush into Christmas – buying discounted electronics or waiting for huge mall sales to save a few dollars, they spent their post Thanksgiving days together, with the family they chose for themselves – their friends and family, laughing, reminiscing, making new memories by recounting old ones. Sitting at table. Together.This week I heard a wonderful sermon about Advent – and waiting. Not rushing. Not stressing. Not overdoing or overbuying. But waiting.Regardless of your religious views or faith perspective, the next four weeks are special. Fall will turn into winter. The last leaves will drop, open clear skies will be followed by bright stars and cold air. Our bodies will tell us to slow down despite the messages from elsewhere that demand otherwise. SHOP NOW. Buy more. DO MORE. Today. THEY NEED THIS GIFT. Your love depends on these earrings. BUY 3 GET 1 FREE.It has become increasingly difficult to drown out the noise, the dull aching roar we hear during the Holidays but I think we must. We must slow down. We must listen. Celebrate with people we love, laughing, around table, together, quietly choosing to ignore the  outside world, even if just for a night.So I think this weekend has reminded me of something. DONT STRESS. About anything. Not about getting it all bought, wrapped, done, baked. Cut a few corners. Take a few naps. Watch your favorite old movie and create a new tradition – like Thanksgiving, that celebrates the greatest blessing of all. Each other. And when you think about this Holiday Season and cannot recall what gift you gave or received, you will realize it was the gift of time together that meant the most.last_img read more

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