Davies hits century for Blues

first_imgMARSEILLE, FRANCE – MAY 23: Bradley Davies of Cardiff is tackled by Joe van Niekerk during the Amlin Challenge Cup Final between Toulon and Cardiff Blues at Stade Velodrome on May 23, 2010 in Marseille, France. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Starting XV:15. Dan Fish, 14. Harry Robinson, 13. Dafydd Hewitt, 12. Jamie Roberts, 11. Tom James, 10. Jason Tovey, 9. Lloyd Williams, 8. Andries Pretorius (c) 7. Sam Warburton, 6. Robin Copeland, 5. James Down, 4. Bradley Davies, 3. Taufa’ao Filise, 2. Andi Kyriacou, 1. Nathan TrevettReplacements:16. Rhys Williams 17. Campese Ma’afu 18. Scott Andrews 19. Lou Reed 20. Rory Watts-Jones 21. Rob Lewis 22. Gareth Davies 23. Tom Williams LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Ulstermen have won all three PRO12 encounters so far this season, whilst their only defeat in their last five clashes with Welsh regions came in this equivalent fixture last season.“Friday I think will be our sternest test against the Heineken Cup finalists”, said Phil Davies. “It’s going to be Ulster’s first game back since the tragic news they received a fortnight ago about Nevin Spence.“We are paying due respect to the situation Ulster are in and how they feel by matching that emotion and that level of performance. Hopefully we will have a great game as a tribute to a great rugby player and a great Ulsterman.” 100 times better: Bradley Davies hits the magic number against Ulster tomorrowWALES AND Blues lock Bradley Davies will make his 100th appearance for the region when they face Ulster tomorrow.Hailing from Llantrisant, the former Pant Comprehensive pupil originally played outside half before moving to the second row and was identified as a 14 year old as a future player when the regions were established.He progressed well through the system and made his Blues debut on the 27th of January 2006 against Edinburgh.The Blues go into the match with confidence, with their only defeat in the opening four rounds of this season’s PRO12 a 19-21 loss at home to Edinburgh in round two.Having been victorious in their last two home fixtures with Irish provinces they now face an Ulster side that return to action following the tragic circumstances of last week’s postponement of the clash with Zebre in Italy.last_img read more

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Lions 2017: NZ Provincial Barbarians 7-13 British & Irish Lions

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Lions tour is officially underway, with the visitors turning in an error-strewn and frustrating display as they chugged to a close win over the Provincial Barbarians. Their hosts are a largely semi-pro side that can boast a trainee nurse and sheep farmer among their ranks. The Lions will want to re-focus right away on their next game, against the Auckland Blues who will be fielding their All Blacks next week.The Lions trailed at half-time 7-6, with Warren Gatland’s son, Bryn, pulling the strings from fly-half and frustrating the Lions with his array of kicking skills. Opposite him, Johnny Sexton struggled to control his side while elsewhere tackles fell off and countless passes were put behind attackers.The Lions kept at it in the second half though, nudging their way ahead thanks to an Anthony Watson try and then they crunched on. It never looked comfortable but they saw it out. They only arrived on Wednesday and are clearly still feeling the effects of their trip, but the show moves on.Below are the players who managed to stand out from the crowd and the key talking points.Stand-out: Kyle Sinckler was a rare shining light for the LionsWhich Lions caught the eye?Taulupe Faletau – With the try-line begging for the Barbarians, Faletau managed to make an incredible tackle on the slide that turned into him holding the ball up over the line. While others lost their heads around him, he kept his. And his defensive decision-making is so impressive.Kyle Sinckler – The big fella can shift and he can give and take at pace. Time and again he put his hands up to take ball on. A confident showing.Ben Te’o – There is no second-guessing with Te’o: he takes the ball to the line hard. Once his team-mates learn how he runs and how he shifts at the gainline, he will become a consistent offloading option.What’s hotA win’s a win and all that – Are Lions openers cursed to forever underwhelm? Well at no point was it pretty, but it was a win. This match won’t go down as a classic, but it pointed to plenty of points to work on for the Lions. And there’s little time to dwell on things. The weather – Okay, it wasn’t literally hot, but the rain held off. There had been torrential downpours through Friday and at the start of Saturday morning, so to have a dry night was a big plus. Particularly for those sitting on the banks of the hill on one side of the Toll Stadium.Family affair: Bryn Gatland and Warren Gatland before the gameWhat’s not Replacements: Elliot Daly.Tries: Watson. Cons: Farrell. Pens: Sexton, Laidlaw. Man on a mission: Taulupe Faletau takes the ball up for the Lions The Lions made hard work of their first match on tour, against the New Zealand Provincial Barbarians. First match jitters – From Iain Henderson missing kick-off receptions to Alun Wyn Jones going offside and Stuart Hogg butchering a two-on-one, it was a first half to forget for Lions fans. So many chances went begging for the Lions. The second half wasn’t much better, with the team with so much Test experience struggling to boss proceedings. Some of it will come down to rust and jet-lag still, of course, but they need to kick things up a gear from this point.Booing the kicker – It’s par for the course in New Zealand, but with Sexton lining up the first kick of the series, boos rang out. Passion you can understand, but it’s not like this crowd are all dyed in the wool Provincial Baa-Baas fanatics. Let both sides crack on during this series.Statistics54% – The Baa-Baas possession stats. They consistently broke the Lions.11 – The Lions penalty count, which may not sound like much, but will still be frustrating. Particularly from a defensive point of view.4 – The number of times the Lions got over the line but couldn’t touch down.NZ Provincial Barbarians: Luteru Laulala; Sam Vaka, Inga Finau (Jonah Lowe 19), Dwayne Sweeney, Sevu Reece; Bryn Gatland (Joe Webber 58), Jack Stratton (Richard Judd 57); Aidan Ross (Tolu Fahamokioa 45), Sam Anderson-Heather (capt) (Andrew Makalio 45), Oliver Jager (Marcel Renata 61), Josh Goodhue, Keepa Mewett (Peter Rowe 61), James Tucker, Lachlan Boshier (Matt Matich 46), Mitchell Dunshea.Tries: Sam Anderson-Heather. Cons: Gatland.British & Irish Lions: Stuart Hogg; Anthony Watson, Jonathan Joseph, Ben Te’o, Tommy Seymour; Johnny Sexton (Owen Farrell 48), Greig Laidlaw (Rhys Webb 58); Joe Marler (Mako Vunipola 49), Rory Best (Jamie George 49), Kyle Sinckler (Tadhg Furlong 49), Alun Wyn Jones, Iain Henderson (George Kruis 49), Ross Moriarty, Sam Warburton (capt) (Justin Tipuric 66), Taulupe Faletau. TAGS: Highlight last_img read more

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Samoan rugby’s financial problems just the tip of a Pacific Island crisis

first_imgWhile the Samoan players are forced to seek public support with such meagre resources, there maybe a much bigger crisis on the horizon Coming together: The England and Samoa side pray after the game at Twickenham By Ed KingAs we approach what has been a controversial lead-up to Saturday’s game against Samoa, England’s players, after much thought, declined the suggestion to donate a lump sum to Samoa’s players after its rugby union declared itself bankrupt, despite strongly refuted claims from World Rugby.There has been an increasing groundswell of support for the Pacific Islanders, which typifies rugby’s strong community spirit and a tacit acknowledgement of the joy and soul Samoan players bring to the game.For now World Rugby’s focus is on the Samoan Rugby Union, and to what extent it can ensure that its players are better protected and better paid to provide them with a sustainable future.But rugby fans will not know the islanders face a deeper existential threat. I spent last week reporting from the 2017 UN climate change summit, hosted by another great rugby power, Fiji.Under threat: Wales played in Apia in the summer but its islands are under threat from climate changeThe two-week conference is being hosted in Bonn, Germany, as Suva is too small to cope with 25,000 delegates, but the event had an unmistakably ebullient Fijian spirit.Amid the joy there is also fear. The country’s rugby-mad prime minister Frank Bainimarama describes the threat of global warming as “life or death” for his country.“We are all in the same canoe,” Bainimarama – broad as an old-school prop – told the meeting as it opened in Monday.Harsh projectionsThe UN’s latest climate science study underpins the fear that rugby’s three Pacific island powers are in the firing line.It says sea levels are rising as a result of melting glaciers in the Arctic, and predicts “severe sea flood and erosion risks for low-lying coastal areas and atoll islands”.Rising ocean temperatures are killing off some coral reefs – which as well as looking nice for scuba divers also provide homes for multiple forms of sea life.Rising surface temperatures are making incidences of malaria and dengue fever more common in Samoa and Tonga.Battling it out: Scotland played in Fiji’s capital Suva in the summerThe UN also warns of “increased stress and declining well-being that comes with property damage, loss of economic livelihood, and threatened communities.”In Bonn, 25-year-old Fijian climate campaigner Lagi Seru told me rising seas are now washing away villages on the north cost of the main island, and in a slightly grimmer twist, cemeteries too.“It’s not just the living that are affected, it’s the dead too,” he said.In addition to the slow rise of the seas, scientists reckon major blowouts like Tropical Cyclone Winston in 2016 may become more severe.An estimated 350,000 Fijians – half the population – were affected by that storm. Half of Tonga’s crops were damaged, with an estimated 80-90% of banana plantations knocked over.Rugby’s challengeIn the short term the implications of climate change mean Pacific governments will need to invest more in bigger sea walls, storm shelters and protect freshwater sources.Physical battle: Courtney Lawes runs into a blue wall of SamoansIn the long term some governments are already preparing for the worst, negotiating climate migration visas with Australia, New Zealand and even the USA. If the scientific projections are accurate, the implications for rugby appear clear: three of its proudest nations face a challenge far deeper and more profound than bankruptcy.When a nation’s way of life is under threat, what time is left for sport?Yet if the response from England’s players is heartwarming – the wider response from the RFU and World Rugby needs more support given the stresses these nations are tackling.Faced with an existential challenge, World Rugby talks of encouraging more tier-one nations to visit the Pacific.Blood brothers: Billy and Mako Vunipola hail from TongaMeanwhile the RFU  – which boasts the likes of Mako Vunipola, Billy Vunipola, Nathan Hughes and Denny Solomona and Semesa Rokoduguni hailing from the islands – despite pledging £75,000 from the gate receipts on Saturday, seems less willing to agree an equitable revenue sharing deal that could be invested into the Pacific region.According to Dan Leo, head of the Pacific Rugby Players’ Welfare association, around 500 Pacific players now ply their trade in the UK alone.England’s quota of Islanders has risen sharply since Tongan winger Lesley Vainikolo became the first Polynesian to wear the red Rose in 2008.Flying Fijian: Tevita Kuridrani is another player to hail from the Pacific IslandsThis weekend 23 players with Pacific heritage will play for tier-one countries, among them Wales’ Taulupe Faletau (Tonga), Ireland’s Bundee Aki (Samoa) and Australia’s Tevita Kuridrani (Fiji).More are likely to follow, predicts Kya Lal, a Fiji-based lawyer and academic who has studied the rise in climate-linked migration.A massive rugby fan – she fears that Fiji’s epic 2016 Olympic Sevens win could be an anomaly if the flow of players away from the islands continues to increase.“It’s amazing what we have been able to achieve given the lack of resources, but there’s reason to believe these will be more strained as a result of climate change,” she says.“The impacts are only going to get worse, and if more players emigrate that will hamper our ability to compete.”They may be Pacific Warriors. But they also need our help.Ed King is a freelance environmental writer based in London. He was founding editor of Climate Home News, and is a consultant for the European Climate Foundation.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: FijiSamoa last_img read more

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Robbie’s Rugby Festival celebrates ten-year anniversary

first_imgFollowing a full day of pitch action, festivalgoers are invited to attend the FESTIBALL. Celebrations will include a drinks reception, dinner, dessert stations, numerous charitable activities, live music and photo booths, as well as an exciting line-up of entertainment. The tens tournament, played over four pitches, is the focal point of a packed day.Come on down: the matches take place across four pitches at Loughborough Grammar SchoolAnother key ingredient is Jake’s Round Robin, a six-team social tournament named after Jake McCarthy, an old boy of Loughborough GS pupil and Manchester Metropolitan University.In 2012 he suffered a seizure on holiday in Thailand and was found to have a brain tumour that, on 24 December that year, took his life. The past decade has seen a 16% rise in deaths from brain tumours in the UK and the Jake McCarthy Foundation raises awareness of the symptoms to ensure early diagnosis.Every year his friends enter a team in his memory and thus, in the true spirit of rugby, people are coming together and giving back to the game. Lending his support: Neil Back is an ambassador for the festival (Getty Images)The desire to raise funds and awareness for the charities is at the heart of Robbie’s Rugby Festival, and the bar has been set high.“We are immensely proud of the legacy Robbie’s Rugby Festival has and cannot thank our supporters enough,” says Georgie Fowle, co-founder of Addo Events who organise the festival. “Their generosity has enabled the festival to make a real difference to those affected by cancer. Yet despite the mighty figures raised to date, it is a mere drop in the ocean. Robbie’s Rugby Festival needs as many people as possible to join in the fight against cancer.“We look forward to welcoming familiar faces and newcomers alike as we hope to smash previous year’s figures and keep supporting our charities to continue their vital work.” Spirit of rugby: Robbie’s Rugby Festival has done much for charities combating cancer and brain tumours LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Nottingham Rugby are one of the many event sponsors and Neil Back, who started his senior career there before finding wider fame with Leicester and England, is an ambassador.“Events like this bring the rugby family together and there is something available for everyone,” says Back. “It started very small and now there are 30 teams. I live in Leicestershire and know members of both families involved. They raise money every year while having a great time.” Entry to the rugby is free (donations welcome) and tickets to the FESTIBALL are £60, with tables of eight, ten and 12 available, priced from £440. To book visit robbiesrugbyfestival.comLegacy: the names of Robbie Anderson and Jake McCarthy live on through the ten-year-old festival Over the past decade, the event has raised more than £61,400 for the two charities. Funds raised from the festival have helped the Jake McCarthy Foundation to fund the recruitment and three-year placement of a dedicated Senior Research Associate at the University of Plymouth.center_img Support from Robbie’s Rugby Festival has allowed the trust to purchase two vital pieces of equipment for the hospital’s ward 27: an ultrasound bladder scanner and a cannula scanner. Both reduce the trauma, stress and bruising for the patient while undergoing treatment. Anyone for Pimm’s? Supporters at Robbie’s Rugby Festival, which is going from strength to strengthIn addition to the Robbie Tens and Jake’s Round Robin, this year again features a ladies sevens tournament that was launched last year to much acclaim.Entrants for this year’s tens tournament include clubs such as Syston, Long Eaton, Melbourne, Derby, Leodienisans and Quorn.There are several invitation sides from universities and local schools, while one name to catch the eye is Team Mayne. They play in memory of Richard Mayne, who died on the Malaysian Airlines flight that was shot down in 2014. The team is based in Market Bosworth, where Richard was deputy head boy at Dixie Grammar School.While the players work up a sweat, spectators can spend time in the Rugby Village, which features a bar, physio tent, gin tent and hot tub among other attractions, or enjoy a refreshing Pimm’s in the Summer Garden.Thirsty work: a bar at the event that has raised more than £61,000 for charity over the past decade The event has become a permanent fixture of the summer calendar with rugby royalty including Neil Back, Sir Clive Woodward, Eddie Jones, Dan Carter, Christian Wade, Warren Gatland, Sam Warburton, Richie McCaw, Sonny Bill Williams and Billy Twelvetrees showing their support over the years. Men of action: Tom Walker Memorial team honour a lad who was on the same ward as Robbie AndersonA group of school friends played an old boys’ reunion match in Robbie’s honour in 2009 and ten years on that has morphed into one of the largest tens tournaments in England, attracting 30 teams and thousands of spectators. Festival winners* 2009 Loughborough Endowed Schools* 2010 Syston RFC* 2011 Team Schweff (Loughborough Endowed Schools Alumni Team)* 2012 Syston RFC* 2013 Syston RFC* 2014 Seals (Loughborough Endowed Schools Alumni Team)* 2015 Do it for Dawson (Durham University Alumni Team)* 2016 Seals (Loughborough Endowed Schools Alumni Team)* 2017 Do it for Dawson (Durham University Alumni Team) & Hinckley RFC (shared) It’s a landmark year for the Midlands’ largest tens event. Behind the Loughborough tournament are two poignant stories that sparked the rugby community into action Robbie’s Rugby Festival celebrates ten-year anniversaryRugby and charity go hand in hand and one of the best examples of that union takes place on Saturday 28 July on the playing fields of Loughborough Grammar School.Robbie’s Rugby Festival is a joyous mix of tens and sevens rugby played to a sombre backdrop. Robbie Anderson was only 13 when he lost an 18-month battle against cancer in 2006, but he still created a trust to help young people and their families cope with and fight cancer on a daily basis.Every day in the UK, six teenagers are diagnosed with cancer and a modernised ward at Leicester Royal Infirmary is tangible evidence of the difference the Robbie Anderson Cancer Trust has made to the lives of young patients.last_img read more

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Archbishop of Canterbury’s Christmas sermon

first_img Featured Events Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Lambeth Palace] The Archbishop of Canterbury says Christmas challenges individuals and whole societies alike not to build lives based on selfishness and fear, but to be open to searching questions about identity and solidarity, stark questions that are more pressing in the wake of falling confidence in institutions and challenges to social order.In his Christmas Day sermon, delivered at Canterbury Cathedral this morning, Archbishop Rowan Williams says that the coming of Christ still poses immense challenges to the way people understand their lives and the times they live in. The Gospels are still full of questions to us about who we are and how we respond to God’s love – and early Christian writings are full of the faltering attempts to give voice in response.“Very near the heart of Christian faith and practice is this encounter with God’s questions, ‘who are you, where are you?’ Are you on the side of the life that lives in Jesus, the life of grace and truth, of unstinting generosity and unsparing honesty, the only life that gives life to others? Or are you on your own side, on the side of disconnection, rivalry, the hoarding of gifts, the obsession with control? … What we say or do in our response to Jesus is our way of discovering for ourselves and showing to one another what is real in and for us … the truth is still an uncompromising one: if you cannot or will not respond, you are walking away from reality into a realm of trackless fogbound falsehood.”The challenge, he says, is not simply to individuals but to society as a whole to find words to respond and he cites the Book of Common Prayer, which is this year celebrating its 350th anniversary, as providing an example of how a society’s response came to be articulated. It underlines, he says, notions of duty and common interest; speaking of and to a world in which the church, the state and the rich and powerful need continually to be aware of the immense obligations owed by those who have much to those who are poor and vulnerable. He says that, even though centuries old, the Prayer Book reflects far more than the social conventions of the day:” … much of this language feels dated – we don’t live in the unselfconscious world of social hierarchy that we meet here. But before we draw the easy and cynical conclusion that the Prayer Book is about social control by the ruling classes, we need to ponder the uncompromising way in which those same ruling classes are reminded of what their power is for, from the monarch downwards. And the almost forgotten words of the Long Exhortation in the Communion Service, telling people what questions they should ask themselves before coming to the Sacrament, show a keen critical awareness of the new economic order that, in the mid sixteenth century, was piling up assets of land and property in the hands of a smaller and smaller elite.’ The Prayer Book is a treasury of words and phrases that are still for countless English-speaking people the nearest you can come to an adequate language for the mysteries of faith.”He quotes from the communion service as a pointer to a developing understanding of mutual obligation:“If ye shall perceive your offences to be such as are not only against God but also against your neighbours; then ye shall reconcile yourselves unto them; being ready to make restitution” (the Long Exhortation, Book of Common Prayer).The need to learn these lessons is all the more important, he argues, in the wake of the events of the past year:“The most pressing question we now face, we might well say, is who and where we are as a society. Bonds have been broken, trust abused and lost. Whether it is an urban rioter mindlessly burning down a small shop that serves his community, or a speculator turning his back on the question of who bears the ultimate cost for his acquisitive adventures in the virtual reality of today’s financial world, the picture is of atoms spinning apart in the dark.And into that dark the Word of God has entered, in love and judgment, and has not been overcome; in the darkness the question sounds as clear as ever, to each of us and to our church and our society: ‘Britain, where are you?’ Where are the words we can use to answer?”ENDSThe Full textWhen the first Christians read – or more probably heard – the opening words of John’s gospel, they would have understood straight away quite a lot more than we do.  They would have remembered, many of them, that in Hebrew ‘word’ and ‘thing’ are the same, and they would all have known that in Greek the word used has a huge range of meaning – at the simplest level, just something said; but also a pattern, a rationale, as we might say, even the entire structure of the universe seen as something that makes sense to us, the structure that holds things together and makes it possible for us to think.Against this background, we can get a glimpse of just what is being said about Jesus.  His life is what God says and what God does; it is the life in which things hold together; it is because of the life that lives in him that we can think.  Jesus is the place where all reality is focused, brought to a point.  Here is where we can see as nowhere else what connects all reality – all human experience and all natural laws.  Edward Elgar famously said about his Enigma Variations that they were all based on a tune that everyone knew – and no-one has ever worked out what he meant.  But John’s gospel declares that the almost infinite variety of the life we encounter is all variations on the theme that is stated in one single clear musical line, one melody, in the life of Jesus of Nazareth.  ‘In him was life, and the life was the light of men.’But this shouldn’t make us forget entirely the underlying image.  The life that lives in Jesus, the everlasting divine agency that is uniquely embodied in him, is like something that is said – a word addressed to us.  Because, like any word addressed to us, it demands a response.  And the gospel goes on at once to tell us that the expected response was not forthcoming.  Before we have even got to Christmas in the words of the gospel we are taken to Good Friday, and to the painful truth that the coming of Jesus splits the world into those who respond and those who don’t.   Once the word is spoken in the world, there is no way back.  Your response to it, says the gospel again and again, is what shows who and what you really are, what is deepest in you, what means most.  What we say or do in our response to Jesus is our way of discovering for ourselves and showing to one another what is real in and for us.  Like the other gospel writers, John hints very strongly that some people respond deeply and truthfully to Jesus without fully knowing who he is or what exactly they are doing in responding to him; this is not a recipe for tight religious exclusivism.  But the truth is still an uncompromising one: if you cannot or will not respond, you are walking away from reality into a realm of trackless fogbound falsehood.There is the question we cannot ignore.  It’s been well said that the first question we hear in the Bible is not humanity’s question to God but God’s question to us, God walking in the cool of the evening in the Garden of Eden, looking for Adam and Eve who are trying to hide from him.  ‘Adam, where are you?’ The life of Jesus is that question translated into an actual human life, into the conversations and encounters of a flesh and blood human being like all others – except that when people meet him they will say, like the woman who talks with him at the well of Samaria, ‘Here is a man who told me everything I ever did.’  Very near the heart of Christian faith and practice is this encounter with God’s questions, ‘who are you, where are you?’  Are you on the side of the life that lives in Jesus, the life of grace and truth, of unstinting generosity and unsparing honesty, the only life that gives life to others?  Or are you on your own side, on the side of disconnection, rivalry, the hoarding of gifts, the obsession with control?  To answer that you’re on the side of life doesn’t mean for a moment that you can now relax into a fuzzy philosophy of ‘life-affirming’ comfort.  On the contrary: it means you are willing to face everything within you that is cheap, fearful, untruthful and evasive, and let the light shine on it.  Like Peter in the very last chapter of John’s gospel, we can only say that we are trying to love the truth that is in Jesus, even as we acknowledge all we have done that is contrary to his spirit.  And we say this because we trust that we are loved by this unfathomable mystery who comes to us in the shape of a newborn child, ‘full of grace and truth’.Finding words to respond to the Word made flesh is and has always been one of the most demanding things human beings can do.  Don’t believe for a moment that religious language is easier or vaguer than the rest of our language.  It’s more like the exact opposite: think of St John writing his gospel, crafting the slow, sometimes repetitive pace of a narrative that allows Jesus to change the perspective inch by inch as a conversation unfolds.  Or of St Paul, losing his way in his sentences, floundering in metaphors as he struggles to find the words for something so new that there are no precedents for talking about it.  Or any number of the great poets and contemplatives of the Christian centuries.  It isn’t surprising if we need other people’s words a lot of the time; and it’s of great importance that we have words to hand that have been used by others in lives that obviously have depth and integrity.  That’s where the language of our shared worship becomes so important.This coming year we celebrate the 350th anniversary of the Book of Common Prayer.  It has shaped the minds and hearts of millions; and it has done so partly because it has never been a book for individuals alone.  It is common prayer, prayer that is shared.  In its origins, it was meant to be – and we may well be startled by the ambition of this – a book that defined what a whole society said to God together.  If the question ‘where are you?’ or ‘who are you?’ were being asked, not only individual citizens of Britain but the whole social order could have replied, ‘Here we are, speaking together – to recognize our failures and our ideals, to recognize that the story of the Bible is our story, to ask together for strength to live and act together in faithfulness, fairness, pity and generosity.’  If you thumb through the Prayer Book, you may be surprised at how much there is that takes for granted a very clear picture of how we behave with each other.  Yes, of course, much of this language feels dated – we don’t live in the unselfconscious world of social hierarchy that we meet here.  But before we draw the easy and cynical conclusion that the Prayer Book is about social control by the ruling classes, we need to ponder the uncompromising way in which those same ruling classes are reminded of what their power is for, from the monarch downwards.  And the almost forgotten words of the Long Exhortation in the Communion Service, telling people what questions they should ask themselves before coming to the Sacrament, show a keen critical awareness of the new economic order that, in the mid sixteenth century, was piling up assets of land and property in the hands of a smaller and smaller elite.The Prayer Book is a treasury of words and phrases that are still for countless English-speaking people the nearest you can come to an adequate language for the mysteries of faith.  It gives us words that say where and who we are before God: ‘we have erred and strayed from thy ways like lost sheep’, ‘we are not worthy so much as to gather up the crumbs under thy table’, but also, ‘we are very members incorporate in the mystical body of thy Son, which is the blessed company of all faithful people; and are also heirs through hope of the everlasting kingdom’. It gives us words for God that hold on to the paradoxes we can’t avoid: ‘God… who art always more ready to hear than we to pray,’ ‘who declarest thy almighty power most chiefly in showing mercy and pity, ‘whose property is always to have mercy.’  A treasury of words for God – but also a source of vision for an entire society: ‘Give us grace seriously to lay heart the great dangers we are in by our unhappy divisions’; ‘If ye shall perceive your offences to be such as are not only against God but also against your neighbours; then ye shall reconcile yourselves unto them; being ready to make restitution’The world has changed, the very rhythms of our speech have changed, our society is irreversibly more plural, and we have – with varying degrees of reluctance – found other and usually less resonant ways of talking to God and identifying who we are in his presence.  If we used only the Prayer Book these days we’d risk confusing the strangeness of the mysteries of faith with the strangeness of antique and lovely language.  But we’re much the poorer for forgetting it and pushing it to the margins as much as we often do in the Church.  And it is crucial to remember the point about the Prayer Book as something for a whole society, binding together our obligations to God and to one another, in a dense interweaving of love and duty joyfully performed.The Prayer Book was once the way our society found words to respond to the Word, to say who and where they were in answer to God’s question.  Those who prayed the Prayer Book, remember, included those who abolished the slave trade and put an end to child labour, because of what they had learned in this book and in their Bibles about the honour of God and of God’s children.  They knew their story; they knew how to give an answer for themselves, how to join up the muddle of their experience in a coherent pattern by relating it to the unchanging truth and grace of God.  That’s why the coming year’s celebration is not about a museum piece.The most pressing question we now face, we might well say, is who and where we are as a society.  Bonds have been broken, trust abused and lost.  Whether it is an urban rioter mindlessly burning down a small shop that serves his community, or a speculator turning his back on the question of who bears the ultimate cost for his acquisitive adventures in the virtual reality of today’s financial world, the picture is of atoms spinning apart in the dark.And into that dark the Word of God has entered, in love and judgment, and has not been overcome; in the darkness the question sounds as clear as ever, to each of us and to our church and our society: ‘Britain, where are you?’  Where are the words we can use to answer?© Rowan Williams 2011 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Anglican Communion, Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Posted Dec 25, 2011 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Archbishop of Canterbury’s Christmas sermon ‘Don’t build lives on selfishness and fear’ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Archbishop of Canterbury Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more

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Kids cooking class brings new life into Texas city parish

first_img Press Release Service By Luke BlountPosted Jun 13, 2013 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ June 13, 2013 at 5:41 pm What I remember years ago when I worked in the Soup Kitchen at St. Lukes, Atlanta, Ga. during Thanksgiving and Christmas was that The Rev. Peter Thomas told us to worry about their stomach first and God will take care of their souls. Kids cooking class brings new life into Texas city parish Rector Albany, NY Comments are closed. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Comments (1) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 John Andrews says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 center_img Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Children Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA ‘Chef Jimmy’ shows kids that cooking good food is fun and easy. Photo: Luke Blount[Episcopal Diocese of Texas] In the Fall of 2012, Jimmy Graves saw the Rev. Robin Reeves at a Texas City business leaders meeting and knew that he wanted to see her kitchen at St. George’s Episcopal Church. Though she admits to feeling caught off guard, Reeves invited him to visit St. George’s parish hall. Graves, a former restaurant chef, had a vision for a children’s cooking class, teaching kids and their families to make good meals out of just about anything. And he was convinced the local Episcopal church was the place to make it happen.“God told me we were going to have 30 kids in this place,” Graves said after seeing the facility. “I told Robin that, and she kind of looked at me like I was crazy.”Though she didn’t exactly hear the same message, Robin was determined to bring new life into this aging congregation.“I thought really?” Reeves said. “That seemed far-fetched, especially because it was hard to get in that kitchen. That and the altar are the two sacred places in this church. But I was trying to follow the organic way of God and listen to the spirit.”Reeves and Graves formed a partnership for the Kids Cooking Club, a monthly class for kids and their parents. They work with the local food banks and grocery stores as well as generous parishioners of St. George’s to get ingredients.In an effort to eliminate crime from the main thoroughfares near St. George’s, leaders in Texas City have worked hard to clean up the main streets in the town, putting up new lights and beautifying the area. According to Reeves, Graves asked the business leaders what the community could do besides sweep the crime under the rug. His idea was to help children of all backgrounds grow into better adults, knowing that their community cares about them.“[This ministry] is about serving the latch-key kids, single parents and the families who shop at the food bank, because Jimmy was a latch-key kid,” Reeves said. “It was amazing because I had never thought of that.”Graves now works as an account executive for The Post, a faith-based newspaper in Galveston County, but he admittedly has a checkered past.“My life was in total turmoil,” Graves said, referring to his state of mind just two years ago. “I had a job and money, but in the past I had been homeless and had addictions. All of that didn’t make me turn to God, but on January 18, 2012, I woke up and was ready, and God threw me in.”After much persistence from the newspaper owners, Graves joined The Fellowship Church in Texas City, and his perspective since then has completely changed. He has committed his life to following what God tells him, and the newly attentive Graves makes it clear that he hears God all the time.“God put it on my heart to go back and start cooking and to do it for kids,” Graves said. “When I met Robin, God told me that’s the person I need to talk to about my cooking class.”Graves leads his new life following this intuition, often not deciding his menu until just a few hours before the class. To organizers, this can sometimes be disconcerting, but the results speak for themselves.When the program started, a few months ago, six children came–most of them related to Graves. But by Easter, the class had reached about 30 children along with their parents.“Jimmy is like the town crier,” Reeves explains. The success of the program is largely due to St. George’s hospitality and Graves’ willingness to invite just about anyone he meets.Chris Williams, a father of three, brought his family after parishioner Kent Ross invited him at a Chinese restaurant. Amazingly, Graves had also invited him the week before.“Everything just kind of worked out perfect,” Williams said. “My kids love to cook and they love to eat, so I thought, why not?”The kids and their parents arrive and sign in at noon and then make arts and crafts as Graves prepares the ingredients. Then, after a blessing of the food, “Chef Jimmy” demonstrates for the families how to prepare the food as they each make their meals together. Graves then cooks the food, and they all feast together.“Its amazing to me how all the kids respond to Jimmy,” said Jean McKnight, St. George’s senior warden. “They will try and taste all kinds of things that my kids never would have eaten.”St. George’s is a community that has been searching for a way to infuse some life and youth into their ranks, but had no idea where to start. For years, young families would visit but leave to find another church that had more children. Though the young families that attend the cooking class don’t usually show up on Sunday, there is new hope among the faithful.“At least they are here,” McKnight said. “Some people think they should come to the service too, but maybe they will in a few months or next year when they are more comfortable.”“My hope is to be a neighborhood gathering place and resource for the community,” Reeves said. “My sense is that the spirit is working organically. When I was in seminary, they told me the way to grow things is to look at where God is doing things and join in.”For Graves, it is all about the chance to change a child’s life. “We are planting a seed with kids and letting them take it home to let God work,” he said.— Luke Blount is staff writer and communications specialist in the Episcopal Diocese of Texas. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

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Episcopales cercanos a los incendios de Idaho toman precauciones

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Por Mary Frances Schjonberg Posted Aug 22, 2013 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ El incendio de Beaver Creek puede verse en las montañas que dominan la iglesia episcopal Emanuel en Hailey, Idaho. Foto de Michael Mathewson.[Episcopal News Service] En caso de que alguien precisara de alguna prueba adicional de la gravedad de los incendios forestales en torno a Hailey, Ketchum y Sun Valley en Idaho, el número de personas que asiste a la eucaristía dominical en la iglesia episcopal de Santo Tomás [St. Thomas Episcopal Church] en Ketchum, constituía una señal evidente.En tanto la parroquia de esta ciudad balneario recibe normalmente a unos 230 feligreses los domingos durante esta época del año, sólo 60 vinieron a la iglesia el 18 de agosto.“Eso me dice que más de la mitad de nuestra congregación ha sido evacuada o ha decidido irse por causa del humo”, dijo el Rdo. Ken Brannon, rector de Santo Tomás, a Episcopal News Service,  en una entrevista telefónica el 19 de agosto.Brannon dijo que el oficio del 18 de agosto fue diferente debido al pequeño número de personas que asistió y al hecho de que no hubo música porque no estaba claro si el director musical podría estar “y a que muchos en el coro habían sido evacuados”.“Seguía siendo la liturgia —era lo que siempre hacemos—, pero hubo muchísimo más espacio para el silencio y el tipo de oración espontánea en la Oración de los Fieles”, explicó.Brannon, quien dijo que Santo Tomás con frecuencia funciona como “la iglesia del pueblo” en Ketchum, añadió que él escribió su sermón teniendo en mente a toda la comunidad, no sólo a los miembros de la parroquia.“Cuando a principios de semana vi el versículo con que comenzaba el evangelio no estaba seguro si reír o llorar”, comenzó por decir. “Lucas escribe: ‘Jesús dijo… “Yo he venido a prender fuego en el mundo; ¡y cómo quisiera que ya estuviera ardiendo!”’.“Bien, Jesús”, dijo Brannon riéndose. “Ya hemos tenido bastante fuego para una semana”.Brannon le dijo a [la congregación de] Ketchum que “no somos una Iglesia que cree que Dios envía los desastres naturales para castigar a la gente” ni que “si oramos intensamente, los vientos cambiarán de rumbo o vendrá la lluvia o los bomberos se volverán sobrehumanos”.Un avión tanque DC10 lanza líquido retardador de fuego sobre el incendio forestal de Beaver Creek en Greenhorn Gulch. Foto del Equipo #1 del Control Nacional de Incidentes de la Gran Cuenca.“No somos una Iglesia que espera que Dios altere la naturaleza”, agregó. “Somos una Iglesia que cree que Dios nos altera para que podamos hacerle frente a cualquier cosa que la naturaleza nos presente”.El audio del sermón de Brannon puede escucharse aquí.Aunque algunos avisos de pre-evacuación se suspendieron el 20 de agosto, incluida la parte de Ketchum donde está Brannon, siguen vigentes en otras partes de la ciudad. Las personas que viven al norte y al sur de Ketchum continúan sujetas a una orden de evacuación forzosa, informó él en un correo electrónico a ENS.Él y muchos de la congregación tienen un equipaje de emergencia listo en caso de que les ordenen salir.“Eso es en gran medida un ejercicio espiritual”, afirmó. “Creo que, en algún momento, todo el mundo debería tener que empacar como si fuera a dejar su casa para no volver. Una de las más fascinantes discusiones en la iglesia es lo que empacarías y por qué y lo que ello significa para ti”.Son esas órdenes obligatorias, y el temor a que todos los residentes de estos tres pueblos pudieran recibir tales órdenes, lo que dio lugar a que la Diócesis of Idaho hiciera un llamado el 19 de agosto a potenciales voluntarios que les abrieran sus hogares a los evacuados.“Hay incertidumbre respecto a cuán grande será esta necesidad, o por cuánto tiempo las personas necesitarán ayuda, pero querríamos estar preparados en caso de que la situación cambie súbitamente”, dijo la diócesis en un correo electrónico enviado a todos sus miembros poco antes del mediodía, hora local.El gobernador de Idaho, Clement Leroy Otter (“Butch” ) recibe un informe sobre el incendio de Beaver Creek del jefe del Comando de Incidentes Beth Lund (de espaldas a la Cámara). El incendio forestal de Beaver Creek es ahora mismo la primera prioridad de este tipo de incidentes en Estados Unidos. Foto del Equipo #1 del Control Nacional de Incidentes de la Gran Cuenca.El mensaje electrónico hacía notar que según las evacuaciones forzosas aumentaban, los hoteles entre Boise, Idaho, y Salt Lake City, Utah, —una distancia de 547 kilómetros—estaban llenos o en vías de llenarse rápidamente. La petición [de la diócesis] venía acompañada con un enlace a una página en la que los voluntarios podían inscribirse e indicar cuántos adultos y niños podían recibir y si podían darle cabida a mascotas y a personas con problemas médicos. La página de inscripción también le pregunta a los voluntarios que indiquen si han recibido el curso de adiestramiento Salvaguardar a los Hijos de Dios [Safeguarding God’s Children] que brinda la Iglesia.La Rda. Lucinda Ashby, canóniga del ordinario en la Diócesis de Idaho, dijo que el sistema de inscripción de voluntarios le permite a los rectores de las parroquias afectadas enviar a personas evacuadas mediante una sola llamada telefónica. “Los evacuados pueden ser recibidos y atendidos por personas que los esperan y los pueden llamar por sus nombres”, dijo ella el 19 de agosto en un correo electrónico a ENS. “La respuesta y la hospitalidad ofrecida por personas de toda la diócesis fue inmediata. La gente quiere ser útil, y quisimos encontrar un medio de hacer que ese deseo de ser útil resultara efectivo”.Cerca de 1.800 bomberos y otro personal de todos los Estados Unidos están combatiendo lo que se llama el incendio de Beaver Creek, que comenzó debido a una descarga eléctrica el 7 de agosto. El incendio abarca alrededor de 42.000 hectáreas en una zona del Bosque Nacional de Sawtooth que un parte actualizado define como “terreno de riesgo”. El Equipo Nacional No. 1 de Control de Incidentes  de la Gran Cuenca asumió el mando de la operación el 11 de agosto y el incendio se reporta ahora mismo como la primera prioridad en el país. Combatir el fuego ha costado $11,6 millones hasta el momento, según el último parte del Centro Nacional Interinstitucional de la Lucha contra Incendios.Dos helicópteros de tipo I cargan agua de un estanque cerca de Greenhorn Gulch Road para verterla sobre el incendio de Beaver Creek. Foto del Equipo #1 del Control Nacional de Incidentes de la Gran Cuenca.Los bomberos hicieron progresos sobre las llamas el 19 de agosto —dando lugar, en consecuencia, a la suspensión de algunas disposiciones obligatorias y de pre-evacuación. Sin embargo, los meteorólogos especializados en incendios forestales tenían buenas y malas noticias en su último pronóstico. La zona experimentaría temperaturas más bajas e índices de humedad más altos el 20 de agosto, lo cual tendería a disminuir los incendios. Pero había una posibilidad de tormentas eléctricas más tarde en el día y el 21 de agosto, lo cual “puede producir vientos erráticos y con ráfagas, que pueden exacerbar el incendio”. Y, si bien la lluvia ayudará a los bomberos, demasiada lluvia podría causar excesivo flujo de agua desde las zonas quemadas e inundaciones.“En lo que ahora mismo respecta, todos los feligreses están a salvo y conocemos su paradero, y por eso nos sentimos en extremo agradecidos”,  dijo Ashby a ENS.El Rdo. Shawn Carty, rector de la iglesia episcopal Emanuel [Emmanuel Episcopal Church] en Hailey, le dijo a ENS en un correo electrónico que los miembros de unas 12 familias de la parroquia han sido evacuados de sus casas, otros se han ido por precaución y algunos han podido regresar a sus hogares.Ashby contó que Carty le había dicho que algunos residentes de Hailey que viven en zonas de barrancos y al oeste de Wood River Valley estaban sujetos a evacuación forzosa y muchos tuvieron que salir en medio de la noche.“Todo el mundo en el valle está haciendo lo más que puede para lidiar con el espeso humo y la ansiedad e incertidumbre de la situación”, dijo Carty.Los miembros de Emanuel están conectados con la comunidad local y la mayoría tienen profundas raíces en la zona, según Ashby.“Varios feligreses han trabajado con el Departamento de Silvicultura, y tienden a ver el incendio como parte de una progresión natural, en el ciclo natural de la zona”, dijo ella.Carty le dijo a Ashby que observar el gigantesco avance del incendio el 16 de agosto era “como estar en medio de una zona de guerra”.Esa noche, la congregación de Emanuel celebró un oficio de oración en su histórico edificio.“Nos sentimos abrumados por el número de personas que ofrecen ayuda y que nos llevan en sus oraciones”, dijo Carty, incluida la campaña diocesana de acogida.“Sabemos que no estamos solos en esta situación. Con frecuencia hemos dicho que en la Iglesia no hay ‘seis grados de separación’, sino más bien dos —las conexiones que Dios hace entre nosotros son mucho más cercanas”, afirmó. “Tantas personas de todo el país nos han enviado correos o nos han llamado para hacernos saber que  están pensando en nosotros y orando por nosotros, que no tenemos palabras para agradecerlo”.Brannon se hizo eco de los sentimientos de Carty, añadiendo que “seguimos sorprendiéndonos de lo que los bomberos son capaces”.“Dios tiene una oportunidad de revelarse en todas las situaciones y veremos cómo Dios se han revelado en medio de este evento”, agrego. “Estamos ocupados y activos siendo la Iglesia en medio de esta emergencia”.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service.Traducción de Vicente Echerri Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopales cercanos a los incendios de Idaho toman precauciones Otros que viven fuera de los límites del incendio ofrecen oraciones y sitio para los evacuadoscenter_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

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Episcopal health group recognized for Affordable Care Act advocacy

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] Say what you will about the Affordable Care Act – and many people have a lot to say – it seems fairly likely that enrollment in the program will open as scheduled Oct. 1 and two Episcopal Church-related organizations, National Episcopal Health Ministries and the Episcopal Public Policy Network, are working together to help people understand the complicated law.That work went on even on Sept. 20, the day that the Republican majority in the U.S. House of Representatives led the passage of a bill to strip all funding for the law that is meant to make preventive health care — including family planning and related services — more obtainable for uninsured Americans.The bill, which is not expected to pass the Senate in its present form, ties that so-called “defunding” of the Affordable Care Act to needed Congressional action to keep the government operating at its current funding level. (Republicans oppose the ACA because, they say with its requirement that all Americans have some sort of health insurance it will increase health care costs, cause premiums to rise, hurt the quality of health care and raises taxes while adding to the national debt.)Matthew Ellis, chief executive officer of National Episcopal Health Ministries, was one of five presenters during a Sept. 20 White House Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships conference call meant to showcase some of the best practices for partnerships that are helping to prepare uninsured Americans to begin signing up Oct. 1 to purchase private health care coverage through insurance marketplaces known as exchanges.Ellis discussed how his organization has been making information about the Affordable Care Act available to people in churches. Ellis also described the resources NEHM has assembled and the partnership the organization has forged with the Episcopal Public Policy Network, which is part of the church’s Office of Government Relations.As the call progressed, the White House office released a toolkit about the implementation of the Affordable Care Act geared specifically for use in community- and faith-based organizations. The kit, and other resources, is here.Episcopal Health Ministries is one of many agencies across the United States that have applied for and received certification by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as a “Champion of Care” for its efforts to educate people about how the law will work, and how to enroll for coverage.The mission of NEHM, a non-profit group that is not an official agency of the Episcopal Church, is to promote health ministry in Episcopal congregations and thus “assisting them to reclaim the Gospel imperative of health and wholeness,” according to its website.“We are called to care for those who struggle to care for themselves,” Ellis told Episcopal News Service before the conference call. “There are numerous examples of healing in the Bible, so anything that we can do to facilitate that healing process is important for us to participate in.”Episcopal Church congregations, through their mission work, have access to a lot of people without health insurance, in addition to those members who may be uninsured, he said.“So, for us to not participate simply because of some political concerns just seems like the wrong thing to do,” Ellis said, adding that the group felt that it was “on firm ground” because the Episcopal Church has a history of supporting the basic principles of health-care reform.“The way that people access health care in our country is primarily by having health insurance so if we can help more people get health insurance, we going to be really helping our communities and everyone at large,” he said.“Is it perfect?” Ellis asked of the law. “No, not by any stretch of the imagination but, it is the system we have right now and we need to make sure we’re using it to the best of its abilities.”To make use of what the law offers, NEHM has encouraged Episcopal congregations to get involved at their own comfort level. For some, it might be simply posting information on a bulletin board, he said. The other end of the spectrum is for a congregation to work with what are known as trained “navigators” who can run workshops and enrollment session at the church. Typically, navigators are trained employees of universities, social service agencies, hospitals, advocacy groups, private businesses and other organizations who may not receive compensation from insurance companies.Ellis also cautioned against making assumptions in congregations that few if any members will be eligible for the Affordable Care Act. “People lose health insurance or are underinsured for many, many reasons, not all of them specific tied to income or their current employment,” he said.A congregation might never know whether, after posting information about the HealthCare.gov website on a bulletin board or in a restroom, someone in the church might get insurance because, Ellis said, “most people are not running around advertising that they don’t have health insurance, especially if they look like they should.”And, Ellis advised be careful about shutting off conversation about the law by the way it is described. “We call it the Affordable Care Act,” he said. “We never, ever, ever refer to it as ‘Obamacare.’”That is “just such a loaded term whether you are for it or against it” that “if you use the term Obamacare when you’re discussing this, you’re immediately going to set people up to have an emotional reaction,” Ellis said.As part of its implementation advocacy, NEHM has posted links to various ACA resources on its website, as well as links to webinars about implementation of the new law.Thus far, NEHM also has posted to its own blog and on the “Public Policy Network Thoughts,” EPPN blog two of four articles the two groups co-authored.The first explains why NEHM and OGR were helping with implementation of the ACA. The second gives more details about NEHM is participating in the implementation and how it has been working for health-care reform.Ellis commended the NEHM partnership with EPPN, saying the network contacted them to see how the two groups could work on the Affordable Care Act “and it’s been a really terrific partnership.”The relationship helped NEHM gain visibility for the resources it has been putting together.“What we always hear about in the church is how our different organizations, our different departments, our different groups should be working together … here’s an example of tow that are actually doing it,” he said.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Barb Hinman says: September 21, 2013 at 9:46 am I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately. Our congregation at Epiphany Denver has a large population of immigrants who may or may not have coverage and whose children are rapidly turning 18 which makes their eligibility requirements change and as young people may be only part-time employees and at risk for losing coverage due to job changes or layoffs. I’m so encouraged to hear others have moved forward with tools for the rest of us.Blessings and Thanks to all that have worked on this,Barb Hinman Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal health group recognized for Affordable Care Act advocacy Partnership between National Episcopal Health Ministries, Episcopal Public Policy Network makes resources available Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Sep 20, 2013 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ann Fontaine says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS September 20, 2013 at 6:01 pm But CPG seems to be fighting the ACA —center_img Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments are closed. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Health & Healthcare Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments (2) Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

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Choirs support and comfort those at life’s thresholds

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group January 17, 2014 at 12:51 pm The Threshold Choir is a wonderful way for human beings to gently reach out to each oither with ‘quiet’ support. I notice that the United Kingdom was not mentioned. We could certainly use them here (in Birmingham, England). AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis By Sharon SheridanPosted Dec 19, 2013 Comments (3) Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Members of “threshold choirs,” such as singers from the Napa Valley Threshold Choir and healing Moon Threshold Singers shown here, sing a capella in very small groups for people at the thresholds of life. Photo: Faith Echtermeyer[Episcopal News Service] It all started with a song.Twenty-three years ago, Kate Munger filled in as a bedside volunteer for a friend dying of AIDS. “All morning I did chores, and in the afternoon I was supposed to sit by his bedside. And he was comatose and agitated, and I was terrified,” she recalled. “I had no idea what to do, so I started singing. I’ve been leading community singing for many years, and there was a song in that period that comforted me, that gave me courage when I was afraid. I sang it for two-and a-half hours.”By the end of that time, he had calmed, “and I got calmer as well,” she said. “I realized that I had given him the best gift that I personally could give him and that I had given him something essential, something very deep from my soul to his soul.”Ten years later, in Berkeley, Calif., she started the first of what now are 108 “threshold choirs,” who sing a capella by invitation for people on life’s thresholds. The Threshold Choir network of primarily women’s choirs stretches across the country and as far as Australia and Cambodia, although most groups are in the continental United States and Canada. Members generally visit homes, hospitals, hospices and other locations in groups of two to four, singing softly in what Munger calls “lullaby voice.”Although Threshold Choir is not a religious organization, members will sing a hymn if asked. Some choirs rehearse at Episcopal churches or have Episcopal members, and at least one choir in Illinois operates as a ministry in an Episcopal parish.“This is prayer and not performance,” said Munger, the organization’s creative director. “I think people that are not religious have access to prayer just like people who are religious.” A threshold choir can provide support for those who don’t necessarily have a church to meet their beliefs and needs, she noted.The definition of “threshold” is somewhat flexible. “We focus on end of life, and some choirs sing for people who are ill and in treatment and struggling,” said Munger, the organization’s creative director. “Our official wording is that we sing for people who are struggling, some with living, some with dying.”In Oregon, the Portland Threshold Choir rehearses at St. David of Wales Episcopal Church and sings for certain communal events as well as for individuals. On Dec. 20 at 6, the group will provide musical accompaniment for a Longest Night Service at the church.While the holidays are portrayed as “a time of sweetness, joy, happiness, light,” this service acknowledges “that there are a lot of people for whom the holiday season has got the other side of that spectrum, too: grief, depression, despair, sadness, anger,” said Kri Schlafer, the choir’s director. The group sings while worshipers have a chance to light a candle and leave a photo or other reminder of someone who died or needs healing. The singers leave space within the music “where people can speak their name into the silence,” she said.“Some people call it a Blue Mass,” said Rector Sara Fischer, adding that the singers “do an absolutely beautiful job helping us to create a really meaningful service every year.”The group also sings at local labyrinth walks and at Portland’s 24-hour Chants for Peace, where groups connected with a variety of traditions each sing for an hour in a kind of musical relay to raise awareness of peace and peace-building.And the choir sings for individuals or families, with groups of one to three people visiting homes, adult foster cares or hospitals, finding out how to be most supportive and singing the songs that would be meaningful to them.“The intention is really to be companions on the journey, whatever journey they’re on,” Schlafer said. “We keep things fairly open in Portland in terms of wanting to honor a variety of thresholds.” Their first call was for a family with a new baby. They’ve also sung for a wedding – “pretty much any significant threshold crossing where that kind of presence is called for,” she said.“We’re not a performance choir; we’re a presence choir,” said Schlafer. And, although the singers rehearse at a church, they are not connected to any particular religion, she said. She herself was raised Episcopalian and now follows the Zen Buddhist mindfulness practice of Thich Nhat Hanh.The choir will sing secular songs or songs from a religious tradition, if that is what will be most meaningful to the listener, she said. “We want to meet them where they are.”The choirs work from a songbook, with many of the songs sung as rounds or with harmony, said Georgia Duncan, who sings with the Flagstaff Threshold Choir in Flagstaff, Arizona. The choir rehearses at the Episcopal Church of the Epiphany, where she is a member.“They’re mostly ones that have been composed for this situation. They’re very simple, spiritual, quiet songs,” she said. On one occasion, the church’s deacon called to say a woman at the hospice where she is chaplain wanted them to come and sing “Whispering Hope.”“It’s not like a performance,” she said. “It’s singing very quietly.”Afterwards, the individuals they sing for seem more relaxed, she said. “Sometimes we’ll sing in the living room area [of a medical institution]. People have remarked that it just seems to lend a note of peace to the whole facility.”The work affects the singers as well. “I feel quieted and uplifted” after singing, Duncan said.For her, the threshold choir is a ministry. “Ministries take all forms,” she said. “I try to be aware of all sorts of situations where one can be a minister without thinking of it in the traditional sense.”In Burr Ridge, Illinois, the St. Helena’s Threshold Singers are not all church members, but the choir is among the ministries of St. Helena’s Episcopal Church, said Daryce Hoff Nolan, choir musical director and co-founder, who is a pastoral associate and diaconal aspirant at the church.“When we rehearse, we start with a prayer intention, which is a little unusual,” she said. “We also have prayer before we go in to sing for someone to settle ourselves. It’s a little bit nerve-wracking, at least at the beginning. You want to be your best.”Many of the members are or have been choral singers, she said. “You’re programmed to be perfect. This does not have to be perfect. We practice in order for it to be as good as it can be for the listener. … The intention is really what drives all of us together, to support and bring healing and comfort.”They sing the music compiled by Threshold Choir, much of it written by choir members, some from folk sources, she said. “For anyone in Christian circles, particularly that’s been involved in meditation … I would liken it to Taize music. It tends to be simple and repetitive, [of a] gentle, lullaby nature.”While they sing to people at the end of life, “it can also be people who are struggling emotionally and need support,” she said. As a music teacher by profession who has worked as a health-care chaplain in a hospital and hospice, “this for me is just the perfect blend … to be able to combine my two great loves.”She recalled singing at the bedside of a parishioner in hospice and later being asked to sing at her memorial service. “The response that people give when they’re being sung to is just profound. This lady’s response was, she sat up in her bed and just smiled and looked at each one of us in the eye.”On another occasion, choir members were doing a workshop for staff in a memory-care unit. As they were leaving, one dementia patient became very agitated, and the staff asked them to sing to her.“At the beginning, she got a little more agitated, but there was a very interesting moment when she took a deep breath and just her whole countenance quieted,” Nolan said. “Actually her breath began to match our song, the breath in the song. It was incredible. And it was really the first some of my choir members had actually had an experience with a patient, so it just made them so acutely aware of what our work was going to do, and it also made them excited to do it.”Early on, the group also sang to St. Helena’s member Chris DiBartelo, a close friend of Nolan’s with chronic back pain.“At first, I kind of felt a little, I don’t know, awkward, because most of these people I knew,” she recounted. “Once the opened their mouths to sing, it was just unbelievably beautiful. It just took me to another place, mentally and emotionally. … It was extremely soothing.”Using a slightly different approach, the Threshold Choir of New York City focuses its efforts on specific hospitals rather than visiting homes. “We don’t have cars. We’re in Manhattan, and it really is difficult to move around,” explained Sue Ribaudo, founder and director. “We decided to go where the people were, and that’s how we decided to be hospital-based.”They began with Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. “It’s a little different there, because it’s not hospice,” she said. “The patients that we’re singing to are just there temporarily in the hospital.”They subsequently added singing on the hospice floors of two other hospitals. They try to visit each hospital once a week, with different song leaders directing groups of three or four people. They’ll visit a hospital floor and sing for different patients, if they wish. Most welcome the experience, she said. “They’re usually surprised. They’re used to getting flowers, not songs.”The cancer patients often applaud, “which we don’t ask for,” Ribaudo said. “We’re not performance-oriented really so much as offering, I’d say, almost a prayer.“Music is spiritual. It speaks to that part of us,” she said. “Many of the songs I think of as being very spiritual, that they speak to something beyond us. And also, we do have in our repertoire … some religious songs in case people request them or if we sense that something like that would be appropriate. No one’s against religion. We just want to be open, especially in New York City. It’s so multicultural, we want to be open to the fact that not everybody’s a Christian.”— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Daryce Hoff Nolan says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab January 15, 2014 at 11:59 pm Wow, what a ministry. I would never have thought of using voices and singing in this way. Keep up the good work. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC James M. Gibbs says: center_img Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Choirs support and comfort those at life’s thresholds Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS May 2, 2014 at 7:07 pm Thank you Very much. Please keep us in your prayers. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Val Cavin says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Comments are closed. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL last_img read more

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Welby in Rwanda: ‘We must encourage vital work of reconciliation’

first_img Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA By Lambeth Palace staffPosted Feb 3, 2014 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Archbishop of Canterbury Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Albany, NY Anglican Communion, Rector Belleville, IL Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK center_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Tags Africa, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN [Lambeth Palace press release] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby arrived in Rwanda the evening of Feb. 1 saying the country had come far since the genocide of 20 years ago. He added: “We must do all we can to encourage the vital work of reconciliation.”The archbishop, accompanied by his wife, Caroline, is visiting Rwanda at the invitation of the Anglican Archbishop, Onesphore Rwaje (right). Welby and his wife are on a five-day visit to South Sudan, Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo to meet with fellow Primates of the Anglican Communion.The trip is part of Welby’s plan to visit all of his fellow archbishops around the Anglican Communion during his first 18 months in office. His desire is to express solidarity, build personal and professional bonds, understand the primates’ work in their local contexts, and lay foundations for good collaboration over the coming years.Arriving in Kigali, the capital of Rwanda, Welby said: “It gives me great joy to visit Rwanda with my wife Caroline at the invitation of the Anglican Archbishop, Onesphore Rwaje. Rwanda is a country so important to the East African revival and the church continues courageously to hold the Gospel before its nation and the wider world.“In a year marking the 20th anniversary of the genocide, it’s a time both to remember and to recognize how far Rwanda has come since those terrible events. We must do all we can to encourage the vital work of reconciliation and healing and the overcoming of fear.” Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Welby in Rwanda: ‘We must encourage vital work of reconciliation’ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

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