Senior football managers ensure team runs smoothly

first_imgBehind every sports team, there is a legion of coaches and staffers that makes sure everything goes according to plan. Senior football managers Justin Cullen, Nathan Feldpausch and Claire Kueny are Notre Dame’s 12th men both on and off-season. Cullen oversees the essentials to all football games — equipment. “I’m the head student in charge of the equipment room and the locker room on both a day-to-day basis and on game day,” he said. Cullen’s job involves coordinating the laundry service with St. Michaels, issuing apparel and gear to the players and fixing any equipment malfunctions that occur during practice. Cullen said his role behind the scenes on game day often goes unnoticed. “What people don’t know is when the team goes out for practice, we set up white boards where different positions meet with their position coaches before the game,” he said. “We do this at halftime too.” Away games make his job a little more challenging, he said. “For away games, after halftime we immediately start moving stuff to our semi because the buses and the semi pull out within an hour of the end of the game,” he said. “That process usually takes through the end of the third quarter and sometimes the beginning the fourth quarter.” While Cullen oversees the equipment, Feldpausch is in charge of administration. Feldpausch works under Chad Klunder, director of football operations.  His main job is to monitor the players’ whereabouts, he said. “I actually get issued a work phone that has the player contacts and figure out where they are when they aren’t on time,” he said. “I always jump a little bit when I hear the [work] phone. [I think,] ‘Uh, oh what do I have to do now?’” His most unique job is watching over Irish coach Brian Kelly’s bag, he said. “I got Coach Kelly’s bag [and] I have to keep it with me at all times,” Feldpausch said. “I carry it on the plane with me and make sure it does not leave my sight.” Kueny oversees personnel involved in making the football game days run smoothly. “I’m the personnel manager, so I’m the person responsible for organizing, scheduling and training all the sophomore and junior managers,” she said. During practice, Kueny makes sure the junior and sophomore managers set up the field properly and know what drills are being performed. She is also responsible for setting up the field before the game and helps run the pre-game warm ups. While the program is fairly fluid now, it is in the midst of changes, she said. Next year, the number of football managers will decrease. Only those who express a deep interest in the football program will work with Irish football, while the other managers will specialize in the Olympic sports, Kueny said. “We’ll have a football pool for people who really want to do football and an Olympic sports pool, so people really go towards their interest,” she said. Cullen said the managers support the team both on and off-season, but their hard work comes to fruition 12 Saturdays a year. “We work for about eight months of the year, [but] when you really think about it, it comes down to 12 football games,” he said.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s screens ‘Band of Sisters’

first_img“Band of Sisters,” a documentary produced and directed by Notre Dame alumna Mary Fishman, screened at Saint Mary’s on Wednesday and was followed by a panel discussion about the film. The film highlights various groups of nuns across the country and shows their work outside of the physical church after hearing the calls of Vatican II. In the movie, sisters campaign for housing, food sustainability and gardening for the poor. They also work in jails, assuring that inmates had the pastoral care they deserved. Sr. Veronique Wiedower said the film reflects the priorities of Holy Cross sisters at Saint Mary’s. “Although the sisters of the Holy Cross are not specifically singled out in the dialogue of the film, those of you familiar with the sisters, will recognize the sisters’ charisma and ministry in the words and examples of other congregations and visually in the pre-Vatican footage of religious life here on Saint Mary’s campus,” Wiedower said. During the panel discussion, Fishman said she wanted to combat stereotypes about nuns in ” Band of Sisters.” “I wanted to set the record straight,” she said. “… I was inspired by the more than 300 year history of religious sisters and I wanted to inspire other people.” Sr. Betty Moyer, a former campus minister at Saint Mary’s, said she hopes people gain a deeper understanding of human dignity and justice from watching this movie.  “[I hope] you feel anger where there is injustice,” Moyer said. Moyer said the documentary portrays well the “real world issues” sisters face in the world outside of the physical church.  “We must address ourselves, and involvement in social justice is what this movie calls us to,” Moyer said. “We do not know what He calls us to; [it is] literally a journey into the unknown.” Holy Cross Sr. Elena Malits, professor emerita of religious studies at Saint Mary’s, said sharing personal stories is important among the religious community.  “A very wise Holy Cross religious recently told me, ‘Someone’s truth is an invitation to a bigger heart and a bigger mind,’” she said. Malits said interacting with the larger community is also part of their vocation.  “That’s really our vocation, to live out that sense of gratitude and sense of participation in this beautiful world, and as I meet these different people and learn different stories, I begin to have a bigger heart and a bigger mind,” Malits said.last_img read more

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