Candidate Profile: LaMagna/Andresen

first_imgWho they are: Presidential candidate Olivia LaMagna is a junior from Farley Hall studying political science and business economics. She hails from Carmel, Ind., and currently serves as the junior class president. Her running mate, Rohan Andresen, is a sophomore from Siegfried Hall studying business and political science. The Phoenix, Ariz., native, is the senator from Siegfried Hall and a member of student government’s Department of National Engagement and Outreach.LaMagna and Andresen said the overarching theme of their campaign is maximizing each student’s experience at Notre Dame, focusing on the question “how do you ND?”“I feel that there’s one story you’re told as a freshman about what your experience at Notre Dame is going to be, but there’s a huge range of opportunities to explore on this campus,” LaMagna said.First priority: Review student government procedures and come up with best practices for organizing a cabinet and a planning timeline for initiatives. LaMagna said her experience on Junior Class Council with Anderson’s background as a hall senator will give each a unique but complementary view on how student government operates and how they can maximize its efficiency.Top priority: Focus on every individual member of the student body and enable each to meet his or her full potential, in whatever way he or she wants. This overarching campaign strategy provides a focal point for their academic, community engagement and programming initiatives.“We want to get rid of the red tape and barriers that hold students back,” Andresen said. “When each student is seen as their own unique person and when that uniqueness is recognized, that’s when you have a diverse campus.”Best Idea: LaMagna and Andersen hope to create a more collaborative relationship between Notre Dame and South Bend, and LaMagna said she wants students to understand that South Bend is much more than a convenient location in which to do service work.“There’s not enough respect for what residents of South Bend can bring to undergraduates at the University of Notre Dame,” LaMagna said. “We want to increase accessibility to the city of South Bend.”Her experience with planning and executing major events as junior class president has given her insight into how to navigate the “administrative red tape” for project planning and especially approving new vendors and sites, LaMagna said.Worst Idea: Their plan to organize a group of undergraduate and graduate students who could teach one-credit specialized classes in areas such as computer programming seems impossible. While the goal of helping students broaden their technical skill sets and branch out beyond the classes required for their majors is good, it would be very difficult to get off the ground. Perhaps organizing a set of independent workshops or lectures on such topics would be more doable, instead of orchestrating it within the class registration and DART systems.Most feasible: Appoint two students, one male and one female, to serve as co-chairs of the Gender Relations Department of student government.“We want to start bringing a diversity of perspectives into that [conversation] because we don’t want it to be … a one-sided discussion,” LaMagna said. “We want everyone to feel like gender relations is something that matters to them, because if you’re a person on this campus, it affects you.”Least feasible: The two hope to break barriers between the different colleges and academic departments by allowing students to register for classes outside of their declared majors.“Right now, students can’t take classes outside of their colleges once they’ve declared,” Andresen said. “We want to be able to open up classes for students outside of their major.”They propose that a time limit be set on the DART system so that first, students who need a particular class for their majors are guaranteed seats. After official DARTing has ended, LaMagna and Andresen hope to open up registration to students outside the college under which the class is listed.Although this plan would offer students more academic freedom, it does not seem feasible given the labyrinth of prerequisite and co-requisite courses often listed. While perhaps general elective courses could be opened up, department chairs would likely resist open enrollment in more advanced, major-specific courses.Notable quote: “This is probably about 10 percent of all the ideas we’ve come up with. That other 90 percent have just been scrapped because of conversations with people, whether that be students or administrators. … These ideas that we have in the platform have had a lot of thought and a lot of discussion.” — AndresenFun Fact: LaMagna said she is an extremely organized person with “spreadsheets that terrify people,” but her dorm room is incredibly messy. Andresen, on the other hand, keeps an impeccable room and “can barely leave without dusting something.”Bottom line: Their platform reflects a comprehensive examination of real student desires, and the two leverage their energy and enthusiasm to come up with new, bold ideas. Their student government experience prepares them for success in future roles, and their focus on programming, as well as on enabling and empowering individual students, suggests they would have a dynamic, visible presence on campus next year.Tags: 2014 Election, Election, Student Body President, Student governmentlast_img read more

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Former Turks and Caicos premier seeks immunity

first_imgMichael MisickPROVIDENCIALES, Turks and Caicos Islands — According to sources in the Haitian community in the Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI), who tend to exchange information with their friends and relatives in Haiti, former TCI premier Michael Misick (45), who has reportedly sought refuge in the Dominican Republic, may be trying to use matrimony to escape repatriation and prosecution in the TCI. Haiti, which shares the island of Hispaniola with the Dominican Republic, is therefore in close proximity to sources in the Dominican Republic, who claim that Misick has married the daughter of a high ranking Dominican Republic official and therefore is immune from extradition. This would be the third known marriage for Misick.According to earlier reports, the Dominican Republic authorities had previously given assurances to their American and British counterparts that they would hand over Misick if called upon to do so.While this story has yet to be confirmed there is much local concern over the fact that the special investigation and prosecution team (SIPT) has yet to question Misick, who was the central figure in the 2009 Commission of Inquiry into allegations of widespread government corruption. Misick has rarely visited the TCI in recent times and has not been seen here since members of his former administration have been arrested and charged with a number of offences, including money laundering and bribery.One of Misick’s last political moves was to support current Progressive National Party (PNP) leader Clayton Greene in his quest to lead the besieged party in a late 2010 convention. All of the contenders were beneficiaries of the Misick regime and all were known to have supported Misick in the February 2007 elections, less than two years before the British Foreign Affairs Committee began to call for a Commission of Inquiry.Misick is the only member of the PNP to flee justice.Meanwhile, in a newly released press statement, former TCI chief minister turned pastor, Oswald Skippings, has said, “Michael Misick was neither the master or the mind that masterminded such an diabolical plot to take over the Crown land and all other tangible assets of the Turks and Caicos people and milk its coffers dry.”The former member of the Peoples Democratic Movement (PDM) executive council and now party stalwart, who last served as deputy leader under Floyd Seymour, did not explain who in his opinion did mastermind the massive sale of Crown land and make the large and expensive loans for the hospitals, other large operating loans, approve purchases of millions of dollars worth of pavement and other government projects without the ability to pay for them.Skippings does, however, appear to contradict himself and charge both past politicians and administrators, saying, “Yes, some of the poor past politicians and administrators are guilty of some infractions and I might add with the help and collusion of executives of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) who are no less guilty, including British governors and British appointed governors.”Skippings, who was once TCI’s youngest chief minister, goes on to chide those who continue to support the British takeover, which is now two-and-a-half years old. When the FCO first announced the need for an interim government, they anticipated two years of direct rule more or less.“The situation is such that even its [the direct rule government] once most ardent supporters and sympathizers have lost all confidence in this British regime, with the exception of a few like minded privileged sympathizers who are reaping where they have not sown and arbitrarily calling the shots at Waterloo [the governor’s residence on Grand Turk],” said SkippingsFinally, Skippings goes on to warn that the people of the TCI will soon emerge from an inactive submissive state to contest the continuation of British direct rule. Skippings did not call for any financial assistance, despite the wide spread discontent over massively increased taxation needed to address the large and increasing debts, as well as health care costs.By Caribbean News Now contributor Share 20 Views   no discussions NewsRegional Former Turks and Caicos premier seeks immunity by: – February 27, 2012 Tweetcenter_img Share Share Sharing is caring!last_img read more

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