James Cameron Sounds the Alarm on Artificial Intelligence and Unveils a Terminator

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Advertisement Login/Register With: Twitter Cameron and Deadpool director Tim Miller sit down with THR to talk for the first time about how they will reboot a storied but troubled franchise for the new era of Amazon drones and AI anxiety: “People ask me, ‘Will the machines ever win against humanity?’ I say, ‘Look at people on their phones. The machines have already won.’”By all objective measures, The Terminator represents the most feared cautionary tale of modern Hollywood: a broken franchise. Thirty-three years after Arnold Schwarzenegger became an international star playing a killer robot sent from the future to kill the mother of the leader of a postapocalyptic rebellion, there have been four sequels (and one TV series), and the three films without the involvement of creator James Cameron have turned off fans and led the property to bounce from studio to studio and reboot to reboot. Terminator: Genisys, a 2015 installment made by financier David Ellison’s Skydance Media (Ellison bought rights from his sister, Megan Ellison, who acquired them in a 2011 auction for $20 million), seemingly, uh, terminated the prospect of future films.But this is Hollywood 2017, and no major franchise is truly dead. Ellison, along with distributor Paramount (Fox has international rights), has persuaded Cameron, who on Sept. 25 began filming four Avatar sequels, to shepherd a new Terminator for the era of Amazon drones, Facebook news bots and artificial intelligence-fueled anxiety. Calling it “a return to form that I believe fans of the franchise have been wanting since Terminator 2: Judgment Day,” Ellison, 34, has for the past year worked secretly with Cameron and Deadpool‘s Tim Miller, who will direct the untitled sequel for a July 26, 2019, release. They assembled a writers room with scribes David Goyer, Charles Eglee, Josh Friedman and Justin Rhodes as well as Ellison, a lifelong Terminator fan (Cameron himself shows up once a week), and have crafted what they want to be a trilogy with Schwarzenegger, 70, and original star Linda Hamilton, 61, passing the torch to a young female lead. Advertisement Advertisement The team hopes it’s launching the equivalent of the new Star Wars trilogy — but with the most successful filmmaker of all time pulling the strings. To unveil their plans and explain why the Terminator franchise is still relevant amid 21st century fears, Cameron, 63, and Miller, 47, joined The Hollywood Reporter’s editorial director Matthew Belloni for a discussion Sept. 19 on the Paramount lot in Hollywood. An edited transcript follows, and a separate Q&A with Cameron on Avatar, Trump and his recent Wonder Woman critiques is here.Jim, why do you want to do this? You can do anything. These are movies you made a long time ago.TIM MILLER I’ve got some pictures on him that he doesn’t want published. (Laughs.)JAMES CAMERON There’s a pride of authorship in anything that you do, and when David and I started talking about this, it made sense for me to see if there was a way to bring it into this century and to relevance. I look at what’s happening now with the emergence of artificial general intelligence equal to or greater than humans’, and you’ve got Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking and others saying that this could be really bad for the survival of the human race. What was science fiction in the ’80s is now imminent. It’s coming over the horizon at us. And there’s been a resurgence of fear and concern about nuclear weapons and so on. So all of these apocalyptic elements are out there. The first two Terminator films that I did dealt with the angst around that and how we reconcile it for ourselves in a fantasy context. So I got excited about the idea of finding a story that made sense for now.So what does a James Cameron-produced Terminator movie look like in 2017?CAMERON This is a continuation of the story from Terminator 1 and Terminator 2. And we’re pretending the other films were a bad dream.READ MORElast_img read more

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INTRODUCING THE 2018 CINEPLEX ENTERTAINMENT FILM PROGRAM RESIDENTS

first_imgMurry Peeters“Identity & subverting expectations.”Murry Peeters is an actor and screenwriter. Her screen credits include guest starring on NBC’s Taken, as well as lending her voice to beloved characters in Far Cry 5 and My Little Pony. One of the 2018 recipients of theMagee TV Diverse Screenwriters Award, Peeters and her past acting experience enable her to write material populated by richly diverse and layered characters. She is currently in development on two feature films, Black White Blue and Woman Meets Girl. Isa Benn“I can no longer do without filling stories. I need my stories free and frank, forceful and wrought with the healing pitch of timelessness.”An award-winning screenwriter, playwright, filmmaker and multi-media/disciplinary creator, Isa Benn is a first-generation Torontonian of African and Caribbean descent. Her stylistically introspective work deals predominantly with experiential culturalism, colour, class, sexuality, spirituality, “alternative” history, gender, mutiny and magical realism. Currently, Benn is in development on two features, the dark comedy, Two Girl Act Play, and the fantasy/drama/comedy, Catch Red Bird, Hit Red Wall. The CFC is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year, which also means the 30th anniversary of the Cineplex Entertainment Film Program – our longest running and signature film program. At its core, this program champions original voices, entrepreneurism and collaboration.Throughout its 30 years, the program has helped launch and/or accelerate the careers of hundreds of remarkable directors, producers, writers and editors, and has developed and packaged a significant number of projects, many of which go on to receive awards and critical acclaim, including recent features Never Steady, Never Still; Mary Goes Round; Closet Monster and Un Traductor.We are excited to welcome 19 new Cineplex Entertainment Film Program residents into the 2018 program on Monday, July 16, 2018. This incoming group of filmmakers represents an incredibly exciting mix of diverse voices, viewpoints and perspectives. Their previous work includes visual art installations, acting, blogging, poetry, documentaries, music videos, commercials, theatre, sketch comedy, webseries, short films and features. What’s more – for the first time ever, the residents of the Cineplex Entertainment Film Program will be comprised of predominantly female talent; 13 out of the 19 residents are women. Learn more about the Cineplex Entertainment Film Program HERE.By Cory Angeletti-Szasz | CFC “We are extremely moved and inspired by this year’s talent,” shared Kathryn Emslie, CFC’s Chief Programs Officer. “The stories they’re tackling traverse the world and range from the fantastical to magical realist, from the absurd and existential to dark comedies and social realism – they’re about love, family, identity, loss, community, displacement, race, gender and sexual politics. What a rich and exciting sandbox they’ll be working in this year.”Read more about this year’s Cineplex Entertainment Film Program residents below.DIRECTORSMEET OUR FIVE 2018 DIRECTORS’ LAB RESIDENTS AND LEARN WHAT IS AT THE HEART OF THE STORIES THEY’RE CURRENTLY DRAWN TO: Danny Sedore“Matt Johnson’s ‘The Dirties’, with its scrappy shooting style and effortless blending of comedy and suspense, inspired me to create unapologetically bold films.”Danny Sedore has produced countless music videos, commercials and short films. He has established connections and lasting relationships with directors, directors of photography, and other experienced producers at various levels in the Canadian film industry. Sedore has a demonstrated ability to approach any project with a focus on the artistry, while improving efficiency and reducing costs. Working at POV 3rd Street, he is passionate about collaborating with and supporting the stories of marginalized communities onscreen. Twitter Julia Rowland“I am exploring the beauty and fragility of life; how to piece your life back together when it gets sidetracked, and how to build a place for yourself in this world.”Julia Rowland is an award-winning writer, director and producer. Her short films have appeared at various film festivals internationally, and recently she was selected to participate in the inaugural IndieVue Female Film Festival. Passionate about inclusive storytelling and creative collaboration, Rowland has also worked as a producer for various television and commercial production companies, and her writing has appeared in Toronto Life, Reel Honey, and other online and print publications. Karen Chapman“I’m drawn to the after – after the dramatic event, after the loss –how everything shifts, how people are transformed, their choices, the beauty in resilience.”Born to Guyanese parents, award-winning filmmaker Karen Chapman has screened her work everywhere from subway displays, airplanes and hospital lounges to international festivals, classrooms, living rooms and mobile devices. A graduate of Emily Carr University, she is also an alumna of the Banff Centre and a Hot Docs/Documentary Channel Channel Doc Accelerator Fellow. In 2017, Chapman was named one of CBC’s “great Canadian filmmakers of the future.” Julia Hart“I find myself telling a lot of female-driven stories. At the heart of all stories I have explored, there is always hope and a bit of humour, even when the characters feel alienated or menaced by those around them.”Julia Hart is a writer/director who began her film career working for Stephen Fry at Sprout Pictures in the U.K. Her first short film as a director, Emma, Change The Locks, premiered at the Raindance Film Festival in 2015 and won a New Talent Award at the British Film Institute’s 10th BFI Future Film Festival in 2017. Hart’s work has screened at festivals around the world, including the Toronto International Film Festival. She is currently developing her first feature, The One Hundred Nights of Hero, based on the acclaimed graphic novel of the same title by Isabel Greenberg. Ben Allan“I would love to have cut ‘Magnolia.’ Some great performances and a challenge to shorten such a tightly woven story into a more digestible film.”Ben Allan is an editor originally from Hertfordshire, U.K. and currently based in Toronto. With more than 10 years of experience, he began by editing small documentaries for BBC News. Since then, Allan has assisted on The Magic School Bus Reboot, edited episodes of Fraud Squad on Discovery Channel Canada, and cut more than 20 Much Fact music videos. He has also edited seven shorts and two feature films, including Bigfoot and the Burtons, which was seen in 13 countries and recently premiered on Showtime. Advertisement PRODUCERSWHICH FILM(S) OR TV SHOW(S) HAS/HAVE GREATLY INFLUENCED OUR INCOMING PRODUCERS’ LAB RESIDENTS’ SENSE OF STORYTELLING? FIND OUT BELOW: Lee Walker“Terrence Malick’s The ‘Thin Red Line.’ Not only would I love to have cut the incredible battle scenes, but the pacing and rhythm was perfectly matched with the raw emotion of this film.”Lee Walker has more than a decade of editing experience in scripted and unscripted television, shorts, webseries and promos. Working between Vancouver and Toronto, Walker’s work has aired on the CBC, NBC, HGTV, City TV and YTV. She edited three seasons of the History TV series Yukon Gold and recently assisted on the AMC series Into The Badlands at Take 5 Productions. A graduate of Ryerson University’s Film Studies Program, Walker is also a member of the Directors Guild of Canada and an associate member of the Canadian Cinema Editors. Orlee Buium“’Fight Club.’ I loved how the editing kept the audience in the dark about what was really going on in the story, mirroring the psyche of the main character.”Orlee Buium is a Toronto-based film editor who balances her love of film with her passion for the outdoors. She completed a BFA in Film Production and Screenwriting at York University, where she edited several short films, one of which won a CCE Student Merit Award. Since graduating, Buium has worked as an assistant editor on feature films and television series, and as an editor on various short films, commercials, and behind-the-scenes content. The 2018 Cineplex Entertainment Film Program Residents. Directors (L to R): Kim Albright, Joseph Amenta, Isa Benn, Karen Chapman, Julia Hart. Writers (L to R): Brooke Banning, Laurel Brady, Sina Gilani, Murry Peeters, Julia Rowland. Producers (L to R): Evren Boisjoli, Samantha Kaine, Elizabeth Melanson, Alexandra Roberts, Danny Sedore. Editors (L to R): Ben Allan, Orlee Buium, Christopher John Malanchen, Lee Walker. Christopher John Malanchen“’The Departed’ – my favourite part is the opening sequence; the editing and music really set the tone while bringing all the main players into the fold.”Christopher John Malanchen is a film, television and web editor, and a graduate of the Alberta College of Art and Design (BFA) and Sheridan College (Advanced Television and Film Program). Since 2006, he has been making films and working professionally as an editor, including for Bitchin’ Kitchen (Cooking Channel), Million Dollar Genius (History Channel), and the award-winning independent documentary, The Weekend Sailor. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Alexandra Roberts“I was raised on ‘I Love Lucy.’ It allowed me to move through the world with the assumption that female characters could be fearless, hilarious, challenging, and frankly – anything they want.”Alexandra Roberts is a Toronto-based producer specializing in ambitious and forward-thinking television, film and documentary content. She received her BA in Cultural Studies from McGill University and an MA in Media Studies from The New School in New York. Roberts cut her teeth in the industry working on the first season of VICE’s Emmy-winning newsmagazine series for HBO, and since then, her work has aired globally on networks such as Al Jazeera English, A&E, VICELAND and CGTN. Elizabeth Melanson“I have been inspired by Shonda Rhimes’ success in creating compelling stories that captivate the audience, with strong female characters, in ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ and ‘Scandal.’”Elizabeth Melanson is an actor and producer, and a graduate of the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts. In 2013, she co-founded the production company, The Mini Films, with Mouna Traoré. Their first short film, All of Me, was selected by CBC’s Canadian Reflections in 2015, and their second film, Adorn, won Best Narrative Short at the 2016 Montreal International Black Film Festival. Melanson was also the assistant production manager on Mary Goes Round and the production coordinator on Firecrackers. Login/Register With: Laurel Brady“I am endlessly exploring how characters react to loss and disaster because then my writing can ride the line between heartbreaking and hilarious, yet still feel truthful.”Laurel Brady is a Toronto-based screenwriter, playwright and performer. She studied theatre at York University, screenwriting at George Brown College, and sketch writing at Second City Toronto. Brady has written and produced two short films, Pop the Question and Billable Hours, and her plays have been featured onstage at Theatre Passe Muraille, The London Fringe and various theatres across Ontario. She is also the recipient of the Theatre Creators Reserve Grant, by recommendation of Theatre Passe Muraille. Samantha Kaine“JS Baca’s raw, poetic depiction of his cultural truths in ‘Blood In Blood Out’; my first influence into how I intertwine cultural truths in my storytelling.”Samantha Kaine is a film, television and theatre producer, writer and actor. Her producer credits include Offbeat Roads (2013), a television series with Blue Ant Media that has sold internationally; the Toronto mainstage theatrical play Sheets (2017), by Salvatore Antonio; and two short films, Willing to Lie (2017) and The Women of Alpine Road (2017). Kaine is currently in development on her first feature film and a webseries, and she is a strong advocate for unique, boundary-breaking stories that empower women. Kim Albright“I’m drawn to stories which subvert the familiar and everyday, and force audiences ask themselves those ‘what if?’ questions about their daily lives.”Kim Albright is an award-winning Canadian-British-Filipino director. Her shorts, Dragonfly, Edward’s Turmoil, Albatross and The Purple Plain, were all supported by Film London and the British Film Institute (BFI). Her films have won awards and competed at festivals worldwide, including Encounters Film Festival, British Independent Film Festival, Oscar-qualifying Atlanta Film Festival and the BFI London Film Festival. Albright has been featured on BFI’s Upshot Program, which showcases “the most exciting emerging U.K. filmmaking talent.” Sina Gilani“Me, myth, mother and metaphor. I’d say these are the major themes inspiring my current body of work.”An award-winning Iranian-Canadian actor/writer at home in Toronto via Tehran, Sina Gilani started his journey as an audience member and a volunteer before pursuing his passion professionally. Invited to the National Theatre School as a guest playwright in 2009, he then trained at Humber College and York University. A poet himself, Gilani finds his work is often inspired by world mythology, classical texts and folklore stories. He is an alumnus of the Buddies in Bad Times Emerging Creators Unit (2013-2014) and a playwright member of the Soulpepper Academy (2016-2018). Evren Boisjoli“’La Haine’; strong in storytelling as it included the director’s personal interests while also discussing current issues without forgetting its chief goal of entertainment!”Evren Boisjoli is a film producer, executive and entrepreneur. He is the founder and CEO of Achromatic Media Inc. and a founder of post-production house, Outpost. His filmography includes titles such as Fauve (Sundance Special Jury Prize, 2018) and We’re Still Together (Karlovy Vary, 2016). Boisjoli holds a Bachelor’s degree in Film Production from the renowned Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema. Brooke Banning“My work features female leads who, consciously or unconsciously, dismantle the toxic myths and value systems underlying contemporary life.”Brooke Banning is a Toronto-based screenwriter and playwright. Some of her theatre credits include Wolf Sounds (The Box Toronto), Swell Broad (Storefront Theatre) and Joyful Noise (Helen Gardiner Phelan Playhouse), as well as film credits The Return and The Brooke Banning Show. She has also presented at Cahoots Lift Off! Festival and the 2014 Accessing the Arts Symposium. Banning engages with and prioritizes abilities in the arts, and is one of the founders of ActingWorks, a conservatory-style acting program for individuals with special needs. Advertisement EDITORSWE ASKED OUR FOUR INCOMING EDITORS’ LAB RESIDENTS WHICH NOTABLE FILM THEY WOULD HAVE LOVED TO EDIT AND WHY. CHECK OUT THEIR ANSWERS AND BIOS BELOW: Facebook Advertisement WRITERSGET TO KNOW OUR FIVE INCOMING WRITERS’ LAB RESIDENTS AND WHAT MAJOR THEMES ARE INSPIRING THEIR CURRENT BODY OF WORK AS WRITERS: Joseph Amenta“I wish to diversify the characters and stories we see in film through authentic representation of women, LGBTQ, and people of colour.”Since graduating with honours from Ryerson University’s Schools of Image Arts’ Film Studies Program in 2013, Joseph Amenta has written, directed and produced three short films. His first two shorts, Wild Youthand Cherry Cola, have both screened at festivals internationally, with the latter premiering at the Vancouver International Film Festival (2017) and screening at the Inside Out Film Festival (2018) in Toronto. Amenta’s most recent short, Haus, was fully funded by the Canada Council for the Arts, and will begin its festival run in June 2018.last_img read more

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IT CHAPTER 2 Has Started Production and James McAvoy Shares a Photo

first_img Twitter Advertisement Facebook Login/Register With: Director Andy Muschietti has officially started production on the highly anticipated film IT: Chapter 2. James McAvoy shared a photo having fun with a little Derry related pun which you can see below.The movie is shooting in Toronto and the sequel has a great cast that includes James McAvoy as Bill, Jessica Chastain as Beverly, Bill Hader as Richie, Jay Ryan (Beauty and the Beast) as Ben, James Ransone (Generation Kill) as Eddie, with Andy Bean (Here and Now) as Stanely Uris, Isaiah Mustafa as Mike, and then there’s creepy Bill Skarsgård as the Pennywise the Clown.The original young cast will also return for the sequel for some flashback scenes. They include Jaeden Lieberher, Jeremy Ray Taylor, Sophia Lillis, Finn Wolfhard, Wyatt Oleff, Chosen Jacobs, Jack Dylan Grazer and Nicholas Hamilton. Advertisement Advertisement The sequel is set 27 years after the Losers Club defeated Pennywise The Clown when they were kids. As they’ve grown up, they’ve forgotten about what had happened. When bad things start to happen in Derry again and kids begin to go missing, Mike Hanlon, who stayed behind in Derry to keep watch over the town, calls up his old friends and reminds them of the promise they made to come back and stop it if it ever came back.The movie is set to be released on September 6th, 2019. I loved the first film and I can’t wait for this sequel. I’m curious to see how Muschietti handles it. He has said in the past that it will be even scarier and more intense than the first one, so that’s something to look forward to!It has previously been revealed that Chapter 2 will include more of the interdimensional turtle, which was teased in the first film a few times. It will also have a much darker tone to it, and it has been said that Mike Hanlon’s character will be drastically changed, as he will be a junkie. You can read more about that here.The sequel will also most likely explore Pennywise the Clown a little more. We’ve heard that the sequel may include elements from Pennywise’s history in Derry such as the story behind The Black Spot and there was a deleted scene from the first film that was revealed that included Pennywise eating a baby. That could be included in the sequel as well if they really do plan on giving us a history of the monster. Then Bill Skarsgard hopes that it will explore the twisted mind of Pennywise.by Joey Paur | Geek Tyrant LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

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GORD DOWNIE SCULPTURE UNVEILED AT HALIFAX CITY HALLS RECONCILIATION SPACE

first_img Facebook Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement “I was listening to the radio in my garage and the Hip came on and I was staring at this pot sitting on my work bench, and the first thing that dawned on me was, ‘That’s going to be Gord Downie’s hat,”‘ said Hattie, standing next to his glass-enclosed sculpture.“It’s made out of a double boiler pot, utensils, fan shroud, an old lamp post, and a turntable for the brim of the hat.”The piece is situated in the Legacy Space at city hall, the first municipal building in Canada with a room dedicated to reconciliation.The concept of legacy rooms is the brainchild of Assembly of First Nations regional Chief Morley Googoo, and he worked with Downie to make it a reality before his 2017 death.Googoo, who represents Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador, said the sculpture allows the public to participate in reconciliation.“The art and the beauty of this statue is actually having Canadians step up and do something. The call is being answered in such a beautiful way with this statue,” said Googoo after the unveiling.“Change is happening. People are hearing the story. People are being moved and trying to created a new narrative with beautiful things, and the statue unveiled today is absolutely beautiful and will hopefully get more people talking.”Hattie said he’s honoured that his piece — previously displayed at an art gallery in Kingston, Ont., the rock band’s hometown — will be in the legacy room for six months.“I really wanted it to be some place where it would bring out that emotion and make people remember what Gord asked us as Canadians — to do something,” he said.“Maybe it will make people think, ‘What can I do?’ And if it starts a conversation, what more can you ask for?”The legacy room initiative is part of the Gord Downie and Chanie Wenjack Fund, which honours the 12-year-old Wenjack, who died in 1966 after running away from a residential school near Kenora, Ont.“(The) program is an opportunity for corporations, government, organizations and educational institutions to play an important role in their communities,” the fund’s website said.“They also serve as symbols and reminders for employees, clients, students and guests of the important work each of us needs to do if the promises of this country are to be fulfilled.”There are five legacy rooms in Halifax, and 22 in total across the country.Downie died in October 2017 of brain cancer, but spent his final years raising awareness about Canada’s dark history of residential schools through the story of Wenjack.The plight of the 12-year-old Anishinaabe boy inspired Downie’s “Secret Path” multimedia project.The Canadian government launched the residential school system in the 19th century.Over decades, about 150,000 Indigenous children were removed from their homes and sent to religious boarding schools.Away from their families and culture, many students lived in horrific conditions and endured severe abuse. The impact of residential schools continues to be felt today.Aly Thomson ~ The Canadian Press Dartmouth artist Al Hattie’s Gord Downie tribute sculpture, created from recycled and upcycled materials called “The Last Show,” is shown in the Legacy Room at Halifax City Hall on Friday, March 15, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Riley Smithcenter_img Login/Register With: HALIFAX — A Gord Downie tribute sculpture has been unveiled at Halifax City Hall, in a room that aims to foster conversations about Indigenous history and reconciliation.The sculpture was created by artist Al Hattie using recycled metals that emulate a microphone stand and Downie’s signature hat, complete with feathers.On a wall behind the sculpture — titled “The Last Show” — is the shadowy profile of the Tragically Hip frontman. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitterlast_img read more

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WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM NETFLIX INSIDE OUT IS OPENING MAJOR DOORS

first_img“When we heard the announcement last year about Netflix committing to $250 million dollars to film development in Canada, we really wanted to find a way to be a part of that,” Wilson says. Facebook Twitter Advertisement Login/Register With: Inside Out — the largest LGBTQ film festival in Canada and third largest in the world — kicks off tonight with the immensely anticipated Elton John biopic Rocketman. And while the high-profile nature of that film (along with other titles at the festival, like an episode of Netflix’s Tales of the City reboot and Nisha Ganatra-Mindy Kaling collab Late Night) is certainly impressive, what’s intrigued me the most about Inside Out as of late is its aggressive new strategies to propel the future of LGBTQ storytelling in this country forward.Alongside a short film pitch competition, Inside Out now has the world’s only LGBTQ film financing forum, which brings together Canadian and international feature film projects with a bunch of industry folks who can help develop them. And earlier this month, Inside Out made headlines when they announced they are entering a four-year partnership with Netflix “in support of LGBTQ filmmakers in Canada.”It’s a development that Andria Wilson — entering her third year as the festival’s executive director — is clearly very thrilled about when we sit down a few days before Inside Out begins.center_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement Rocketman is opening the festival this year. (Inside Out)last_img read more

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SPACEFY TO SPONSOR TO WEBFEST

first_imgAdvertisement T.O. WebFest This year’s festival will be held July 11-13 at various Toronto venues, including TIFF Bell Lightbox, the home of the Toronto International Film Festival.About SpacefySpacefy is a marketplace that connects creative professionals with spaces for their projects, productions, and events. Harnessing the power of the sharing economy, Spacefy gives creative professionals access to unique and underutilized spaces while enabling property owners to further monetize their space.Spacefy also offers Production Financing Services, helping creators to tap into government grants and tax labour rebate programs for film, TV and Internet projects. Advertisement Facebook Toronto, Ontario – Spacefy Inc. (CSE: SPFY) (“Spacefy” or the “Company”), the sharing-economy marketplace for inspiring space rentals for the creative industry, has signed on as a main sponsor for this year’s T.O. WEBFEST, a digital content festival held in Toronto each year, and organized by the Independent Association of Digital Creators of Canada.For Spacefy, the T.O. WEBFEST sponsorship offers significant online and offline brand presence throughout the festival, including title sponsorship of the Best On Line Short award, and participation in a panel discussion as part of T.O. WEBFEST’s industry day.“We’re proud to be a supporter and partner of T.O. WEBFEST. This is a particularly strong fit for Spacefy,” said Russ Patterson, Spacefy’s CEO. “The festival affords us with a chance to tell our story to ideal potential customers – both for our space rentals marketplace, and for our production financing services.”center_img Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

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Earl wont be there

first_imgAPTN National NewsEarl Cook was in many ways an ordinary young man.Originally from the rural community of Cross Lake, Manitoba, he grew up in foster homes and was plagued by life-long struggles.Now his death from cancer at the age of 23 is being felt from coast to coast.And in the NHL, which become like a second family, tonight Cook is being warmly remembered as a courageous man who faced his challenges with courage and humour.APTN National News reporter Tiar Wilson has the story of an extraordinary life.last_img read more

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Race against time in Nunavut after TB vaccine recall

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe company that makes a vaccine for tuberculosis has announced a recall.It’s a big deal in the North. In Nunavut, every child receives a shot.People are not usually vaccinated in the rest of Canada.APTN National News reporter Kent Driscoll has this story from Iqaluit.last_img

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Opitciwan First Nation taking Canada and Quebec to court over land rights

first_imgTom FennarioAPTN NewsThe Atikamekw Nation filed a lawsuit Tuesday in Quebec Superior Court to settle a land claim that has been under negotiation for decades.“40 years! 40 years of negotiations that have lead to no satisfactory social projects,” said Chief Christian Awashish. “So starting today, we will cease all territory negotiations, and we will commence with a demand for title.”Joined by elders and community members, Awashish kicked off the lawsuit that demands recognition of their ancestral land.The suit names both Canada and Quebec who Awashish said have benefitted greatly from Atikamekw lands.“100 years of  development on our territory, starting with the building of the Gouin dam created in 1918 until 1920,” he said. “No compensation for our community regarding forestry development that has been so prosperous for Quebec, no benefits to our community.”There’s a large discrepancy between how much land Opitciwan First Nation currently has versus what they say is their ancestral land.Indigenous Affairs currently lists the reserve as having 947 hectares.Opitciwan says their entire territory encompasses 2.6 million hectares.Located at the end of a 150 kilometre logging road in the Mauricie region of Quebec, Opitciwan’s remoteness means they still depend on their land for much of their sustenance and one of the reasons why they have been butting heads with Quebec over logging on their ancestral land for years.“That’s where we live, from the time we’re little, we’re always in the forest,” community member Simeon Chachai told APTN News after playing a traditional song asking his ancestors for strengthNadir André is an Innu lawyer who is representing Opitciwan First Nation in the case.He says that the lawsuit is a calculated risk, one that he’s confident he’ll win after the supreme court ruled in favour the T’exelcemc people in British Columba last year,“The situation with T’exelcemc is very similar with Opitciwan, it’s a semi remote community, semi nomad community, and they still use the land, they still have elders, their language, their way of life so they have what it takes to actually go and prove their title,” explainedAndré, who expects the case to take years to settle.Awashish said a few more years of waiting will be worth settling the matter once and for all.“I’m convinced that we will win our cause, the affirmation of our existence,” he concluded.tfennario@aptn.ca@tfennariolast_img read more

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As Olympics near South Korea agonizes over postGames costs

first_imgGANGNEUNG, South Korea – South Korean officials have ruled out turning a state-of-the-art Olympic skating arena into a giant seafood freezer. Other than that, not much is certain about the country’s post-Winter Games plans for a host of expensive venues.As officials prepare for the games in and around the small mountain town of Pyeongchang, there are lingering worries over the huge financial burden facing one of the nation’s poorest regions. Local officials hope that the Games will provide a badly needed economic boost by marking the area as a world-class tourist destination.But past experience shows that hosts who justified their Olympics with expectations of financial windfalls were often left deeply disappointed when the fanfare ended.This isn’t lost on Gangwon province, which governs Pyeongchang and nearby Gangneung, a seaside city that will host Olympic skating and hockey events. Officials there are trying hard to persuade the national government to pay to maintain new stadiums that will have little use once the athletes leave. Seoul, however, is so far balking at the idea.The Olympics, which begin Feb. 9, will cost South Korea about 14 trillion won ($12.9 billion), much more than the 8 to 9 trillion won ($7 to 8 billion) the country projected as the overall cost when Pyeongchang won the bid in 2011.Worries over costs have cast a shadow over the games among residents long frustrated with what they say were decades of neglect in a region that doesn’t have much going on other than domestic tourism and fisheries.“What good will a nicely managed global event really do for residents when we are struggling so much to make ends meet?” said Lee Do-sung, a Gangneung restaurant owner. “What will the games even leave? Maybe only debt.”___TEARING THINGS DOWNThe atmosphere was starkly different three decades ago when grand preparations for the 1988 Seoul Summer Games essentially shaped the capital into the modern metropolis it is today.A massive sports complex and huge public parks emerged alongside the city’s Han River. Next came new highways, bridges and subway lines. Forests of high-rise buildings rose above the bulldozed ruins of old commercial districts and slums.The legacy of the country’s second Olympics will be less clear. In a country that cares much less now about the recognition that large sporting events bring, it will potentially be remembered more for things dismantled than built.Pyeongchang’s picturesque Olympic Stadium — a pentagonal 35,000-seat arena that sits in a county of 40,000 people — will only be used for the opening and closing ceremonies of the Olympics and Paralympics before workers tear it down.A scenic downhill course in nearby Jeongseon will also be demolished after the games to restore the area to its natural state. Fierce criticism by environmentalists over the venue being built on a pristine forest sacred to locals caused construction delays that nearly forced pre-Olympic test events to be postponed.Gangwon officials want the national government to share costs for rebuilding the forest, which could be as much as 102 billion won ($95 million).___NO FISHDespite more than a decade of planning, Gangwon remains unsure what to do with the Olympic facilities it will keep.Winter sports facilities are often harder to maintain than summer ones because of the higher costs for maintaining ice and snow and the usually smaller number of people they attract. That’s especially true in South Korea, which doesn’t have a strong winter sports culture.Not all ideas are welcome.Gangwon officials say they never seriously considered a proposal to convert the 8,000-seat Gangneung Oval, the Olympic speed skating venue, into a refrigerated warehouse for seafood. Officials were unwilling to have frozen fish as part of their Olympic legacy.Gangwon officials also dismissed a theme park developer’s suggestion to make the stadium a gambling venue where people place bets on skating races, citing the country’s strict laws and largely negative view of gambling.A plan to have the 10,000-capacity Gangneung Hockey Center host a corporate league hockey team fell apart.Even worse off are Pyeongchang’s bobsleigh track, ski jump hill and the biathlon and cross-country skiing venues, which were built for sports South Koreans are largely uninterested in.After its final inspection visit in August, the International Olympic Committee warned Pyeongchang’s organizers that they risked creating white elephants from Olympic venues, though it didn’t offer specific suggestions for what to do differently.Cautionary tales come from Athens, which was left with a slew of abandoned stadiums after the 2004 Summer Games that some say contributed to Greece’s financial meltdown and Nagano, the Japanese town that never got the tourism bump it expected after spending an estimated $10.5 billion for the 1998 Winter Games.Some Olympic venues have proved to be too costly to maintain. The $100 million luge and bobsled track built in Turin for the 2006 games was later dismantled because of high operating costs. Pyeongchang will be only the second Olympic host to dismantle its ceremonial Olympic Stadium immediately after the games — the 1992 Winter Olympics host Albertville did so as well.___‘MONEY-DRINKING HIPPOS’Gangwon has demanded that the national government in Seoul pay for maintaining at least four Olympic facilities after the Games — the speed skating arena, hockey centre, bobsleigh track and ski jump hill. This would save the province about 6 billion won ($5.5 million) a year, according to Park Cheol-sin, a Gangwon official.But the national government says doing so would be unfair to other South Korean cities that struggled financially after hosting large sports events. Incheon, the indebted 2014 Asian Games host, has a slew of unused stadiums now mocked as “money-drinking hippos.” It would also be a hard sell to taxpayers outside of Gangwon, said Lee Jae-soon, an official from the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism.Unlike the 1988 Olympics and the 2002 World Cup, which were brought to South Korea after bids driven by the national government, the provincial government led the bid for the Pyeongchang games and it did so without any commitment from Seoul over footing the bill.Under current plans, Gangwon will be managing at least six Olympic facilities after the games.These facilities will create a 9.2 billion won ($8.5 million) deficit for the province every year, a sizable burden for a quickly-aging region that had the lowest income level among South Korean provinces in 2013, according to the Korea Industrial Strategy Institute, which was commissioned by Gangwon to analyze costs.Hong Jin-won, a Gangneung resident and activist who has been monitoring Olympic preparations for years, said the real deficit could be even bigger. The institute’s calculation is based on assumptions that each facility would generate at least moderate levels of income, which Hong says is no sure thing.He said that could mean welfare spending gets slashed to help make up the lack of money.South Korea, a rapidly-aging country with a worsening job market and widening rich-poor gap, has by far the highest elderly poverty rate among rich nations, according to Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development figures.If Seoul doesn’t pay for the Olympic facilities, and Gangwon can’t turn them into cultural or leisure facilities, it might make more sense for Gangwon to just tear them down.Park said the national government must step up because the “Olympics are a national event, not a Gangwon event.”last_img read more

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Fed expected to keep interest rates unchanged

first_imgWASHINGTON – When the Federal Reserve wraps up its latest meeting, it will likely point to strong economic growth, low unemployment and rising inflation as reasons to stay on a path of gradually lifting interest rates. It is unlikely, however, to make any interest rate moves Wednesday.The Fed’s statement may also discuss potential risks from rising trade tensions. But it is almost certain the statement will not acknowledge the recent criticism lodged at the central bank from President Donald Trump.The Fed has already raised rates two times this year in March and June. It signalled at the June meeting that it expected to raise two more times in 2018. Many analysts believe those hikes will occur in September and December.The March and June rate hikes followed three hikes in 2017 and one each in 2015 and 2016. The Fed’s key policy rate is now at a still relatively low level of 1.75 per cent to 2 per cent. But it’s up from the record low near zero where it remained for seven years as the central bank worked to use ultra-low interest rates to lift the economy out of the Great Recession.The string of quarter-point rate hikes is intended to prevent the economy from overheating and pushing inflation from climbing too high. But higher rates make borrowing costlier for consumers and businesses and can weigh down stock prices. Trump has made clear he has little patience for the Fed’s efforts to restrain the economy to control inflation.“Tightening now hurts all that we have done,” Trump tweeted last month, a day after he said in a television interview that he was “not happy” with the Fed’s rate increases.Over the past quarter-century, presidents have maintained silence in public about Fed actions, believing that lodging complaints would be counter-productive. That’s because it could produce even faster rate hikes if the central bank feels the need to convince financial markets that it will not yield to political pressure and allow inflation to rise to worrisome levels.Following Trump’s comments, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin tried to strike a reassuring note that the White House doesn’t want to interfere with the Fed’s policymaking.“We as an administration absolutely support the independence of the Fed, and the president has made it clear that this is the Fed’s decision,” Mnuchin said on “Fox News Sunday.”At the moment, economic growth is strong, rising at an annual rate of 4.1 per cent in the April-June quarter, the best showing in nearly four years. Unemployment is at a low 4 per cent, and some analysts believe it will fall further when the government releases the July figures on Friday.But there are worries as well, led by fears of what a Trump-led trade war might do to growth in the United States and around the world.Many analysts believe that the possible harm from rising tariffs was a key discussion topic this week, although it may not show up in the Fed’s policy statement.Delivering the Fed’s semi-annual report to Congress last month, Powell refrained from criticizing the Trump administration’s effort to use the threat of tariffs to try to lower trade barriers. But Powell noted that the Fed was hearing a “rising chorus of concern” from business contacts about the harm a trade war could cause.Powell hasn’t publicly addressed Trump’s criticism of Fed rate hikes. But the chairman had previously said in a radio interview that the central bank has long operated independently in making interest-rate decisions based on what was best for the economy and not in response to political pressure.last_img read more

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Why Huawei arrest deepens conflict between US and China

first_imgWASHINGTON — The arrest of a prominent Chinese telecommunications executive has driven home why it will be so hard for the Trump administration to resolve its deepening conflict with China.The arrest of Meng Wanzhou, Huawei’s chief financial officer, has heightened skepticism over the trade truce that Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping reached last weekend in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Stock markets tumbled Thursday on fears that the 90-day cease-fire won’t last, but regained their equilibrium in Europe and Asia on Friday.A bail hearing for Meng, who faces possible extradition to the United States after her arrest in Vancouver, Canada, last weekend, was set for later Friday.Huawei has been a subject of U.S. national security concerns for years and Meng’s case echoes well beyond tariffs or market access. Washington and Beijing are locked in a clash between the world’s two largest economies for economic and political dominance for decades to come.“It’s a much broader issue than just a trade dispute,” said Amanda DeBusk, chair of the international trade practice at Dechert LLP. “It pulls in: Who is going to be the world leader essentially.”Meng was detained on the same day that Trump and Xi met at the Group of 20 summit in Argentina and agreed to a cease-fire in their trade war. The Globe and Mail newspaper, citing law enforcement sources, reported she is suspected of trying to evade U.S. sanctions on Iran.Huawei is the world’s biggest supplier of network gear used by phone and internet companies and long has been seen as a front for spying by the Chinese military or security services. A U.S. National Security Agency cybersecurity adviser, Rob Joyce, last month accused Beijing of violating a 2015 agreement with the U.S. to halt electronic theft of intellectual property.Other nations are increasingly being forced to choose between Chinese and U.S. suppliers for next-generation “5G” wireless technology. U.S. critics are lobbying other countries not to buy the equipment from Huawei, arguing that the company may be working stealthily for Beijing’s spymasters.“There is ample evidence to suggest that no major Chinese company is independent of the Chinese government and Communist Party — and Huawei, which China’s government and military tout as a ‘national champion’ is no exception,” Sens. Mark Warner, D-Va., and Marco Rubio, R-Fla., wrote in October to Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. They urged him to keep Huawei off Canada’s next-generation network.Still, a senior Japanese official cast doubt Friday over reports that his country was considering blocking Huawei and its biggest Chinese rival, ZTE Corp., from government procurement contracts. He said there had been no decision. Australia, New Zealand and Britain are among the countries that have moved to limit the Chinese companies’ involvement in their next-generation telecoms networks.In a sign Meng’s case might not derail the Trump-Xi truce, Beijing protested Meng’s arrest but said talks with the Trump administration would go ahead. Chinese Commerce Ministry spokesman Gao Feng said China is confident it can reach a deal during the 90 days that Trump agreed to suspend a scheduled increase in U.S. import taxes on $200 billion worth of Chinese products.Some analysts say China has deployed predatory tactics in its drive to overtake America’s dominance in technology and global economic leadership, such as forcing American and other foreign companies to hand over trade secrets in exchange for access to the Chinese market and engaging in cyber-theft.Washington also regards Beijing’s ambitious long-term development plan, “Made in China 2025,” as a scheme to dominate such fields as robotics and electric vehicles by unfairly subsidizing Chinese companies and discriminating against foreign competitors.Priscilla Moriuchi, a former East Asia specialist at National Security Agency now with the cybersecurity firm Recorded Future, said both ZTE and Huawei are wedded to China’s military and political leadership.“The threat from these companies lies in their access to critical internet backbone infrastructure,” she said.The Trump administration has tightened regulations on high-tech exports to China and made it harder for Chinese firms to invest in U.S. companies or to buy American technology in cutting-edge areas like robotics, artificial intelligence and virtual reality.Earlier this year, the United States nearly drove Huawei’s biggest Chinese rival, ZTE Corp., out of business for selling equipment to North Korea and Iran in violation of U.S. sanctions. But Trump issued a reprieve, perhaps partly because U.S. tech companies, major suppliers to ZTE, would also have been scorched. ZTE agreed to pay a $1 billion fine, change its board and management and to let American regulators monitor its operations.The U.S. and Chinese tech industries depend on each other so much for components that “it is very hard to decouple the two without punishing U.S. companies, without shooting ourselves in the foot,” said Adam Segal, cyberspace analyst at the Council on Foreign Relations.Dean Garfield, president of the U.S. Information Technology Industry Council trade group, said innovation by U.S. companies often depends utterly on product development and testing by Chinese partners and component suppliers.Still, the pushback against Huawei and ZTE is limiting their reach into the world’s richest markets. Nearly a year ago, AT&T pulled out of a deal to sell Huawei smartphones. Barred from use by U.S. government agencies and contractors, they’re mostly locked out of the American market.Derek Scissors, a China specialist at the conservative American Enterprise Institute, doubts that China will change its tech policies since it needs innovative technologies to keep its economy growing as its labour force ages and it confronts a huge stockpile of debt.“We’re not going to deal that away in 90 days,” he said. “I don’t see a way out of this.”Likewise, Rod Hunter, an international economic official in President George W. Bush’s White House and a partner at law firm Baker McKenzie, said, “I’m skeptical that the Chinese are going to want to say ‘uncle.’” U.S. and Chinese officials are “trying to tackle a problem that is going to take years, maybe a decade, to resolve.”___Bajak reported from Boston. AP staff writers Rob Gillies in Toronto, Joe McDonald in Beijing and Yuri Kageyama in Tokyo contributed to this report.Paul Wiseman And Frank Bajak, The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Cheaper gas sends US consumer prices down 01 pct

first_imgWASHINGTON — Consumer prices slipped 0.1 per cent last month, pulled down by sharply lower gas prices and cheaper air fares, used cars, and mobile phone plans.The Labor Department said the consumer price index rose just 1.9 per cent in December from a year earlier, the first time it has fallen below 2 per cent since August 2017.Excluding the volatile energy and food categories, core prices rose 0.2 per cent for the third month in a row. They rose 2.2 per cent from a year ago for the second straight month.The figures suggest that the healthy economy is not yet creating widespread inflation pressures. That gives the Federal Reserve more leeway in deciding whether to raise interest rates. Fed Chair Jerome Powell has said the Fed can be “patient” regarding rate hikes this year.Christopher Rugaber, The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Taylor budget bylaw gets first three readings

first_imgTaylor’s business mill rate of 5.55 cents per $1,000 is also the lowest in the PRRD, while its major industry mill rate is the second-highest at 44.22. Only heavy industry in Tumbler Ridge pays a higher rate.In total, Taylor will be bringing in $14,374,223 this year, with $6.3 million to be spent on operating expenses, and $7.4 million on capital expenditures. The Disitrct will be borrowing roughly $3.75 million to begin development of the Parcel Z subdivision. The District began moving forward on developing the 8.9-hectare triangle shaped plot of land west of Spruce St. in December. The District plans to develop the land, which it owns, before selling the up to 65 lots zoned for single family houses to the public.After passing the first three readings, District of Taylor Financial Plan Bylaw No. 825, 2018  is due to be adopted at the next District meeting. TAYLOR, B.C. — The District of Taylor’s five year financial plan bylaw passed first three readings at Tuesday’s Council meeting.The District is following the lead of Fort St. John in largely maintaining the status quo in terms of tax revenue collected by raising tax rates to account for a drop in home value assessments. The average price of a home in Taylor fell from $336,000 to $320,000 this year, while tax rates will be rising from $3.24 to $3.40 per $1,000 in value.Though mill rates are increasing by 16 cents per $1,000 in home value, residents with a home of average value will actually pay 64 cents less in property taxes this year. Taylor still has the second-lowest residential property tax rate of any municipality in the Peace River Regional District, behind only Pouce Coupe’s residential mill rate of around 2.8 percent.last_img read more

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Legislation introduced to address growing number of orphaned wells in BC

first_img“We are taking action to deal with the growing number of orphaned well sites by cleaning them up, as well as preventing this from happening in the future,” said Mungall. “Industry will continue to be responsible for their activities, as we provide additional tools for the BC Oil and Gas Commission to protect the environment.”The levy will be set by the BC Oil and Gas Commission board, with Treasury Board approval.Other amendments to the OGAA will increase the commission’s authority to protect public safety and recover the costs associated with these activities. For example, the OGC would be able to establish roadblocks, if necessary, when dealing with an emergency, and recover the cost of those activities from the permit holder responsible for the situation. Other amendments would improve the commission’s operations and strengthen their capacity to manage heritage resources. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources Minister Michelle Mungall has introduced legislation that, if enacted, would oversee improved restoration of orphaned oil and gas wells in B.C.If approved by the legislature, Bill 15, the Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources Statutes Amendment Act, 2018, will amend the Oil and Gas Activities Act and the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act. Amendments to the OGAA would improve funding for orphan site restoration by replacing the current tax structure with a levy to be paid into an industry-funded program that addresses the cost of restoration and environmental clean-up. Additional amendments would also limit orphan sites by granting the commission the ability to require permit holders to conduct restoration work on inactive sites.The BC Oil and Gas Commission would also have the power to refuse permit requests if parties had a history of non-compliance.last_img read more

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Man thrown from vehicle and killed in rollover crash north of Wonowon

first_imgWONOWON, B.C. – One man is dead after a single-vehicle crash occurred off the Alaska Highway north of Wonowon on Sunday evneing.Constable Chad Neustaeter with the Fort St. John RCMP said that officers and BC Ambulance Service crews were called out to a single vehicle rollover on the Mile 109 Road, three kilometres from the turnoff to the Alaska Highway, at around 8:00 p.m.The crash involved a single red 2007 Volkswagen Golf with two occupants; a 41-year-old female driver and a 32-year-old male passenger. Cst. Neustaeter said that officers believe the man was ejected from the vehicle during the collision and was declared dead at the scene. The family of the deceased have been notified, his identity has not been released.The woman was taken by ambulance to the Fort St John Regional Hospital for an assessment and was released shortly thereafter.The Fort St John RCMP is imploring all drivers and passengers to properly wear their seatbelts, which are proven to save lives.Police say that alcohol is believed to have been a contributing factor, but the collision remains under investigation.If anyone witnessed the collision, has any dash cam video, or observed the vehicle’s driving behaviour prior to the crash, they are asked to contact the Fort St John RCMP at 250-787-8100. If you wish to remain anonymous call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or submit a tip online at www.crimestoppersnebc.ca.last_img read more

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Local St John Ambulance Therapy Dog travels to Vancouver

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. –  St John Ambulance Therapy Dog Duvessa and her handler Faye Anstey, Fort St John Unit Facilitator, St John Ambulance (SJA) Therapy Dog Program travelled to Vancouver to help evaluate the Lieutenant General’s dog.Vice-Regal Canine Consort, MacDuff is the new Canine Ambassador to the Therapy Dog Program as he passed the evaluation conducted by long-time volunteer TDP Evaluator, Canadian Forces Veteran and volunteer Joy Dockrey.Provincial Headquarters expressed their excitement to welcome the Lieutenant General to SJA Provincial Office and be part of the evaluation for MacDuff.  Her Honour is thrilled about MacDuff’s successful evaluation and looks forward to promoting the SJA Therapy Dog Program at every suitable opportunity.Handlers and their dogs of the SJA Therapy Program travelled from across the province to participate in the day and celebrate with MacDuff and a ‘Pupcake’. Attendees from the Therapy Dog Program and their Handlers were Laura and Reilly, Yvonne and Branston, Ashten and Pig, Faye and Duvessa.Local Therapy Dog, Duvessa is a 7-year-old Great Dane and weighs 115lbs. When standing on her hind legs she is about 5 foot 10 inches shared her handler Anstey. Due to Duvessa’s size, she sat in the cabin of the Air Canada flight to Vancouver.There are 701 Handlers and their dogs serving 22 communities across BC with an additional three units to come on board in 2019. The Peace Region has dogs and handlers in Fort St John, Dawson Creek and Chetwynd. These volunteers give more than 6500 hours a month as they provide support to the sick, the elderly and the lonely.Anstey shares, St John Ambulance certifies Therapy dogs, these are not Service dogs.If anyone has questions or wishes to have a therapy dog brought into their workplace, school, hospital, care home or a special event, they can email; FortStJohnTDP@sjabcy.calast_img read more

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Serena withdraws No 1 Osaka loses Federer wins at Miami

first_imgMiami: The new site for the Miami Open suddenly is missing a lot of star power.Serena Williams withdrew, blaming a previously undisclosed left knee injury. Less than two hours later, top-ranked Naomi Osaka lost in the third round to tour veteran Hsieh Su-Wei of Taiwan, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-3.Osaka’s departure matched the earliest ever in the tournament by a top-seeded woman and jeopardized her No. 1 ranking, depending on results next week. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over Chandigarh”I feel like I’ve dealt with the stress of people asking me do I have pressure because I have the No. 1 next to my name,” Osaka said. “I thought I was doing fine with that, but I guess I’m not.”Roger Federer briefly seemed headed for the exit but instead advanced to the third round by rallying past qualifier Radu Albot 4-6, 7-5, 6-3.”Radu put me through the ringer,” Federer said.No. 2-seeded Alexander Zverev double-faulted 12 times and lost to wild card David Ferrer, 2-6, 7-5, 6-3. Also Read – Vijender’s next fight on Nov 22, opponent to be announced laterWilliams’ withdrawal was unexpected because she showed no signs of injury a day earlier while winning her opening match against Rebecca Peterson, 6-3, 1-6, 6-1.Williams didn’t mention any health issues during a news conference after the match, and the WTA had no information regarding when she was hurt.Williams’ victory Friday was her first at Hard Rock Stadium, the Miami Dolphins’ home and the Miami Open’s new center court.The tournament moved this year from Key Biscayne, where Williams won eight titles. “I am disappointed to withdraw,” she said in a statement. “It was an amazing experience to play at Hard Rock Stadium this year, and I would like to thank the Miami Open for putting on an amazing event. I hope to be back next year to play at this one-of-a-kind tournament in front of the incredible fans here in Miami.”Federer, a three-time champion, lost serve only once in the first game but was on the ropes until he swept the final three games, to the relief of an enthusiastic stadium crowd.”It was a great atmosphere,” Federer said. “It was electric. I think that’s why I played so well at the end.”While attendance in the stadium continued to be spotty, outer courts were jammed, and the day session drew a tournament record 32,831 spectators.Seeded losers on the men’s side included No. 10 Karen Khachanov, No. 21 Diego Schwartzman, No. 26 Guido Pella, No. 30 Stan Wawrinka and No. 31 Steve Johnson. In a game of inches, the 5-foot-6 Schwartzman lost to 6-foot-11 Reilly Opelka 6-4, 3-6, 6-4.Williams was next scheduled to play No. 18-seeded Qiang Wang, who advanced to the fourth round.Also reaching the women’s round of 16 was the 33-year-old Hsieh, who turned pro in 2001 but has achieved the two biggest victories of her career in the past nine months. Her only other win over a No. 1 player came against Simona Halep at Wimbledon last year.With two-handed groundstrokes from both sides, Hsieh was the steadier player from the baseline against Osaka. When Hsieh closed out match point with a forehand volley winner, she began to cry as the crowd applauded her performance.Osaka smiled when reminded it was the first time in 64 matches she lost after winning the first set.”I know it’s depressing,” she said. “I was thinking about it right after I lost.”Osaka, 21, has won the past two Grand Slam tournaments. Williams, 37, still hasn’t won a tournament since the 2017 Australian Open, before she took a break of more than a year to become a mom. She has played only eight matches this year.Williams’ stay at the Miami Open was also brief last year, when she lost in the first round to Osaka. Friday’s match was Williams’ first since she retired from Indian Wells two weeks ago because of a viral illness.last_img read more

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SC has accepted there was corruption in Rafale deal claims Rahul

first_imgAmethi (UP): Buoyed by the Supreme Court order allowing petitioners seeking a review of the Rafale judgment to rely on leaked documents, Congress president Rahul Gandhi claimed the SC has made it clear that Prime Minister Narendra Modi committed a theft . Rahul Gandhi then challenged Modi to a debate on the Rafale military aircraft deal, which the Congress claims involved corruption, a charge repeatedly rejected by the government. Gandhi recalled a recent interview by the prime minister, in which Modi had said the Supreme Court had given a clean chit to his government on the Rafale deal. Now the SC has made it clear that ‘chowkidarji’ (watchman) has committed a theft, Gandhi told reporters here after filing his nomination papers from the Amethi Lok Sabha constituency. He claimed the apex court has accepted that there is some corruption in Rafale . The apex court, which had earlier cleared the Modi government of accusations of corruption over the Rafale deal, Tuesday said it will hear a review petition on the basis of the new documents, referred to by the petitioners. But Gandhi appeared to interpret the order as an acceptance by the Supreme Court that there was corruption in the deal on the French aircraft. “I am happy and I have been saying so for months that Hindustan’s PM has given the air force money to (industrialist) Anil Ambani, and the SC has accepted it. The SC is going to investigate it,” he said. I want to directly challenge that the SC has said that you have indulged in corruption, he said. Come let’s debate… the country wants to know about corruption, the Rafale deal, demonetisation and Amit Shah’s son.” The reference was to Jay Shah. Last year, a newspaper portal had claimed that his firm recorded a huge increase in turnover after the BJP-led government came to power. Jay Shah had then filed a defamation suit against the news organisation. Gandhi claimed that Modi will not be able to look him in the eye if the two debate the Rafale deal. I want to thank the SC. It’s a very happy day. The SC has talked about justice. Justice has prevailed,” he added.last_img read more

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Qureshi Swaraj likely to interact during SCO meeting in Kyrgyzstan

first_imgIslamabad: Pakistan’s Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi and her Indian counterpart Sushma Swaraj are likely to interact during the upcoming meeting of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) in Kyrgyzstan later this month, a top Pakistani official said Thursday.”The two foreign ministers would be present in the meeting and in all likelihood would interact amongst themselves and with other leaders,” Foreign Office spokesman Mohammad Faisal told the media here. Also Read – 2019 most peaceful festive season for J&K: Jitendra SinghBut he hastened to clarify that “no formal meeting is, however, envisaged”. The SCO Ministerial meeting will take place in Kyrgyzstan on May 21-22. The economic and security grouping was founded at a summit in Shanghai in 2001 by the presidents of Russia, China, Kyrgyz Republic, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. India and Pakistan became its members in 2017. In September, India called off a meeting between Swaraj and Qureshi at the UN citing the release of postal stamps “glorifying” a Kashmiri militant by Pakistan as one of the reasons. Also Read – Personal life needs to be respected: Cong on reports of Rahul’s visit abroadThe Indo-Pak tensions escalated in recent months after a terror attack in Pulwama by Pakistan-based Jaish-e-Mohammed terror group that killed 40 CRPF soldiers on February 14 and a subsequent aerial strike by India on a JeM training camp in Balakot on February 26. On February 27, the Pakistan Air Force retaliated by unsuccessfully targeting several military installations in Jammu and Kashmir. In the dogfight, Pakistan downed a MiG-21 Bison jet and captured an IAF pilot, who was handed over to India on March 1. Faisal also alleged that India was “causing an arms race in the region”. “India has been trying to bring the region into an arms race. Let me say that an increase in the defence budget is not the sole determinant of a nation’s strength,” he said.last_img read more

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