Tips for Preventing School Lunch Waste

first_imgSubmitted by Thurston County Solid WasteSchools throw away a lot of stuff, and a lot of that stuff is food.  In fact, 65% by weight of a typical school’s garbage is uneaten food. As coordinator of Thurston County’s Food to Flowers program, I help schools set up systems to prevent, reuse, recycle, and compost their waste. It always amazes me to see so much food that kids bring from home go uneaten. This includes whole sandwiches, full yogurt cups, and lots of untouched fruit and vegetables that end up in the trash can or the compost bin.All of this uneaten school food is part of a larger problem. The National Resource Defense Council estimates we waste 40% of all edible food in the U.S. This means the average U.S. household spends $1,350 to $2,275 a year on uneaten food. And that doesn’t include all of the water and energy used to produce food that gets landfilled or composted.As a new school year begins, here are some tips to help your family reduce lunch waste, conserve resources, and save money.• Pack it in, pack it out. When your kids bring lunch from home, ask them to bring home any food they didn’t eat. Looking at leftover lunch items is a great way to gain insight into your kids’ preferences and the right portion size. You may even be able to recover some of the uneaten food for future meals.• Let’s do lunch. Involve your kids in packing lunch the night before. Kids are more likely to eat a meal that they’ve helped prepare.• Learn what they like. Make a list of foods that your kids like to eat for lunch and update it often. You may find a simple change like switching to a different apple variety will help your kids eat the apples in their lunch boxes more regularly.• Eat ‘em again. Consider packing last night’s leftovers into today’s lunch, especially if it was popular the night before. You can even dress it up with an added ingredient or two.• Cut up fruits and vegetables. If you pack a whole banana or peach, kids are more likely to throw away what they don’t eat. Packing sliced fruits and vegetables is a great way to control portions, and lets your child easily save leftover pieces for later.• Make a deal. Before offering your kids an after-school snack, request that they finish uneaten items from their lunches.• Don’t forget the packaging. While you look for ways to cut down on food waste, consider also reducing the amount of packaging you send in your child’s lunch. Use reusable containers instead of disposable bags, and avoid single-serving packaged food items.Click here for more great waste-free lunch tips.For more information about the Food to Flowers program, click here  or contact Peter Guttchen at (360) 867-2283 or guttchp@co.thurston.wa.us. Facebook6Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

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Five ‘Outstanding Saints’ to be Inducted into the Saint Martin’s Athletics…

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Saint Martin’s UniversitySaint Martin’s University will induct five people, including two former coaches, a pair of former basketball players and a longtime supporter, into the Athletics Hall of Fame and Hall of Honor on Saturday, Feb. 8, as part of the University’s Homecoming 2014 festivities scheduled for Feb. 7-9.The Hall of Fame and Hall of Honor Celebration is an annual event that recognizes those who have contributed to the excellence of the Saint Martin’s athletics program.A reception for the inductees will be held at 3:30 p.m. in the Norman Worthington Conference Center, in advance of the 5:15 p.m. start of the women’s basketball game in Marcus Pavilion against the University of Alaska.  A formal presentation will take place during halftime of the men’s basketball game against Central Washington University. That game begins at 7:30 p.m. in Marcus Pavilion.The 2014 inductees are as follows:Hall of HonorJoe Alongi (HS ’62, ’66 ) A dedicated supporter of Saints Athletics, Alongi has worked tirelessly to support Saint Martin’s in its efforts to strengthen intercollegiate athletics. He has chaired the Saint Martin’s University golf tournament for 27 years. In 1985, Alongi helped found the Saint Martin’s Athletic Foundation, which established funds for athletic scholarships and other needs of the athletic department. He also played an integral role in the development of Marcus Pavilion, purchasing 120 seats for the Pavilion’s remodel while his efforts allowed for the completion of the upstairs offices, which now house athletics staff, coaches and administration personnel.High School Hall of FameDale Behles (Head Boys’ Basketball Coach)Behles served as a teacher and coach at Saint Martin’s High School. During his first two years, he was an assistant coach under Monte Walker for both the football and basketball team while also coaching junior varsity basketball. In 1962, he became the varsity basketball coach and posted a record of 9-10. In his second season, his team finished with a record of 17-8 and earned a fourth-place finish at the state tournament. Behles’ third, and most successful, season ended with an 18-10 record and a third-place finish at the state tournament. In four seasons as head coach (1962-65), he posted a record of 51-41. Behles has the distinction of being the only coach at Saint Martin’s High School to guide a team to the state tournament. His teams were also the first in school history to win a league and regional championship.Hall of FameBeth (Layton) Jochim ’06  (Women’s Basketball)Layton was a three-year starter from 2003 to 2006, after transferring from the University of Texas-San Antonio. During her career, she scored 1,425 points, which ranks her second all-time at Saint Martin’s University and 11th in the Great Northwest Athletic Conference. In the GNAC career record books, she holds the fourth-best scoring average (17.17 points per game), ranks third in three-point field goals made (228) and second in three-point field goals made per game (2.75). Beth was a three-time All-GNAC selection, earning first team honors as a senior, second team honors as a junior and honorable mention accolades as a sophomore. As a senior, she was named Daktronics second team all-region. She was also named CoSIDA first team academic all-district, as she led the conference in scoring at 20.3 points per game, which also ranked 14th in Division II. Beth has the distinction of holding SMU’s single-game record for three-point field goals made in a game (8).Brad Hooper (Head Men’s and Women’s Cross Country / Track and Field Coach)Hooper introduced the cross country and track and field programs at Saint Martin’s, serving as head coach from 1996 to 2006, putting together an impressive résumé. He coached four Saints who have been inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame, including All-Americans Andy Prentice and Nate Carlson, as well as 12 GNAC individual champions, 46 All-GNAC athletes, the 2006 NCAA West Region Athlete of the Year, a GNAC Athlete of the Year, GNAC Championships Athlete of the Meet, Freshman of the Year and Newcomer of the Year. Under Hooper’s guidance, the men’s track and field team placed 24th at the 2006 NCAA Indoor Championships. Academically, his teams were strong performers, yielding two NCAA post-graduate scholarship award winners, 10 top-five coaches association academic finishes, 11 coaches association Academic All-Americans and a CoSIDA Academic All-American. He also had 11 athletes on the GNAC all-time best list, four All-GNAC performers in cross country and two all-region performers.Chris McGee (Men’s Basketball)McGee was a member of the Saint Martin’s College men’s basketball team for three seasons, from 1978 to 1981. In his first season with the Saints he ranked third in the district in rebounding (9.4) and shot 52.9 percent from the field. As a junior during the 1979-80 season, McGee was named all-league and all-district, and finished the season ranked second in the district in rebounding (9.5), sixth in scoring (17.0) and seventh in field goal percentage (.592). That same season, he was named honorable mention Little All-Northwest. In his final season, McGee averaged 14.8 points and 7.4 rebounds per game, earning all-league, all-district and second team Little All-Northwest honors. He finished his career with 1,158 career points, 725 career rebounds and a 56.1 percent field goal percentage, which at the time of his induction ranks him 15th in all-time scoring, third in rebounding and fourth in field-goal percentage.Those wishing to attend the reception are asked to register in advance.last_img read more

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Legislature Passes Anti-Human Trafficking Bills

first_imgSubmitted by the Washington State LegislatureSeveral important anti-human trafficking bills have passed the Legislature and are on their way to Gov. Jay Inslee for his signature.“Reducing human trafficking, both labor and sex trafficking of minors, is a generational challenge,” Sen. Jeanne Kohl-Welles, D-Seattle, said. “I have been working on trafficking policy in the Legislature since 1994 when former Rep. Velma Veloria began our work here. It’s always been a bipartisan effort with colleagues from both parties and in both chambers working together to find solutions to this scourge on our children and communities. But just this morning I read that the sex industry has grown significantly in the Seattle-Tacoma area – and with so many people still suffering, our work is not over. ”Four bills and one Senate Joint Memorial (SJM 8003) were passed during the 2014 legislative session, and cover a wide range of issues regarding human trafficking.“The joining of these two bills has resulted in better and more comprehensive legislation,” Rep. Kevin Parker, R-Spokane. “This stronger bill is a result of two sides of the aisle to make a meaningful difference for the common good.”HB 1791, which was sponsored by Parker, adds sex trafficking to the existing definition of sex crimes, and was amended with language from SB 6017 (Kohl-Welles) to allow local law enforcement to recoup costs of investigating crimes related to prostitution and sexual exploitation of minors.“I understand it is a common practice for victims to be forced into cheap labor, prostitution, and sexual exploitation by means of coercion,” Sen. Karen Fraser, D-Olympia, said. “I sponsored SB 6339 that will make coercion a felony. I hope it will serve as both a deterrent and penalty for those guilty of these life-destroying crimes.”HB 1292 is a bill that will allow survivors of the commercial sex trade to petition a judge to vacate the penalty of prostitution from their record.“Having this record is a huge hurdle to survivors when they are trying to start anew,” said HB 1292 prime sponsor Rep. Tina Orwall, D-Des Moines. “This bill will help them to find jobs or go to school and allow survivors to move on from the pain of the past.”SB 6126 will align Washington with most other states and require courts to appoint an attorney to represent the nearly 10,000 children placed in foster care in Washington.“Ensuring children are placed in safe and permanent foster homes is of utmost importance to keeping them from running away,” said Chair of the House Public Safety Committee, Rep. Roger Goodman, D-Kirkland. “Often these runaway children end up on the streets, where it is easy for pimps to coerce or force them into being abused or trafficked.”An important request to the U.S. Congress also passed this session (SJM 8003 – Kohl-Welles), asking the Communications Decency Act be amended to better meet the challenges posed by new technologies.“The internet in particular plays an increasingly central role in trafficking,” said Chair of the Senate Law and Justice Committee, Sen. Mike Padden, R-Spokane Valley. “Especially with regards to online advertising that basically sells minors for sex, our laws have not caught up with the abuse taking place through new technology.”“The passage of SJM 8003 this year will, I hope, provide not just Washington, but the whole nation, a means to address sex-trafficking we now are seeing on the internet,” Kohl-Welles concluded. Facebook0Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

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Lacey Rotary Offers Education Needs Grants

first_imgSubmitted by Lacey RotaryLocal Nonprofit groups are encouraged to apply for an Educational Needs Grant 2013-14 through the Rotary Club of Lacey. The funds ($500-$2000 each) are designated to promote education needs in the community and meet one-time needs (not to be part of a non-profit’s regular budget).Specific requests are encouraged! Please send a one-page letter of request with 1) information about your organization, including EIN or nonprofit number  2) specific amount requested and 3) the specific need. The grant does not give endowments, capital funds, fundraisers or individuals (student trips, etc.). Direct needs only.Send requests by April 15 to Lacey Rotary, Education Needs Committee Chair, PO Box 3301, Lacey WA 98503. Facebook27Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

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Steve Smith ruled out of third Ashes Test

first_imgAdvertisement a2p0nNBA Finals | Brooklyn VsqdqWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E7o8si( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) s22uWould you ever consider trying this?😱u3Can your students do this? 🌚gu8Roller skating! 11b2See more on YT⬇️⬇️⬇️See morek74y2aBody tricks that only special people can do pt-1abnHow though? 🤔😂#AdrenalineJunkieszz6oA visualization of how Karma works vn8p91kPowered by Firework Australian batsman Steve Smith has been ruled out of the third Ashes Test after suffering a concussion in the second test at Lord’s. Smith was hit in the neck by a brutal bouncer from Jofra Archer on day four, but had passed the initial concussion test before returning to continue his innings. On Tuesday though, head coach Justin Langer confirmed his absence after Smith sat out Australia’s training session. The former Aussie skipper has played a key role in the series scoring 142, 144 and 92 in his three innings so far.Advertisement “Steve Smith has been ruled out of the third Ashes Test at Headingley, with coach Justin Langer confirming the news after the batsman sat out Australia’s training session on Tuesday,” Cricket Australia announced on their website.Advertisement Smith, whose two centuries in the first Test played a pivotal role in Australia’s win at Edgbaston, returned to bat on Saturday after the blow which floored him. He added 12 runs before finally being declared out. However, he was unable to play on the final day on Sunday as he woke up feeling “groggy” and was replaced by Marnus Labuschagne who became Test cricket’s first concussion substitute. Team doctor Richard Saw was seen speaking with him during team training on Tuesday and vice-captain Pat Cummins also confirmed that the rest of the squad trained without him. There hasn’t been any news on who will replace him for the third Test at Headingley, which starts on Thursday. Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

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India trounce Pakistan on day 1 of Davis Cup tie with 2 dominant wins

first_imgImage Courtesy: Deccan Herald/Instagram(@vkfofficial)Advertisement rqjNBA Finals | Brooklyn VspvWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Eg1i( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) cyn9Would you ever consider trying this?😱8ydkvCan your students do this? 🌚b6jhRoller skating! Powered by Firework Its a double treat for India as their 2019 Davis Cup tie against Pakistan is now on a 2-0 lead as compatriots Ramkumar Ramanathan and Sumit Nagal has trounced their opponents Muhammad Shoaib and Huzaifa Abdul Rehman on the first day.Advertisement Image Courtesy: Deccan Herald/Instagram(@vkfofficial)It was a walk in the park for Ramanathan as the former World no. 111 proved to be way too overpowering for the young 17 year old Shoaib, as the first match lasted just 42 minutes.Ramanathan, currently no. 190, who reached the 2018 ATP World Tour Final at Newport, was present in the post match conference: “I gave my best in every point. We are happy with 2-0 on the first day.Advertisement Expressing his thankful gesture towards the supporters present at the game, the 25 year old addressed on the upcoming doubles match between Leander Paes and Jeevan Nedunchezhiyan versus Pakistan on Saturday.“Now we are looking forward to see Jee (Jeevan) and Leander fire some bombs tomorrow. Let’s get the job done”Advertisement Ranked 128th Sumit Nagal, who hails from the Jhajjar district of Haryana, won the second face off in 64 minutes. This was also the first ever Davis Cup victory for Sumit, as the 22 year old razed Huzaifa 6-0, 6-2.“I started decent and finished it pretty strong. Both of us (he and Ram) had lot of fire today. We did not want to lose.” the 2015 Wimbledon Boys’ Doubles winner told reporters.Even though it was a win for Nagal, Huzaifa had enough juice to push him to deuce points twice, and elongated the match till the 8th game.“They are juniors but they played well and did whatever they could. The guy I played came up with some really good shots. He played to his potential but has a long way to go,” Nagal added. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Indian boxing team’s doctor tests COVID-19 positive!

first_imgImage Courtesy: Getty/TOIAdvertisement 1yp5jNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs1vx7pWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Ei9uv( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 2bxWould you ever consider trying this?😱7jnrCan your students do this? 🌚rRoller skating! Powered by Firework The novel Coronavirus pandemic has another latest case from the Indian sports scene, and this time its the country’s boxing team doctor. Dr Amol Patil, associated with a 11 player boxing team which even consisted the world championship silver medallist Amit Panghal, has tested positive for COVID-19. Advertisement Image Courtesy: Getty/TOIThe doctor, a member of the national camp, tested positive on 13th July at the NIS Patiala campus, where the team of 11 pugilists had assembled for training. This is the first COVID case in sports since its resumption in India, and even though the players themselves had tested negative, the doctor, who is completely asymptomatic, was found positive as his results arrived late Monday.“Dr Amol (Patil) was in quarantine in a centre outside the main campus of National Institute of Sports (NIS) Patiala. As per protocol, before he is allowed to enter main hostel and sports arena, he was given the COVID test on the 7th day (of quarantine) and tested positive,” an official statement from the Sports Authority of India (SAI) was quoted by PTI.Advertisement The full team of boxers, who tested negative, will undergo another round of testing, will be tested again as they stayed together with the doctor in the same quarantine facility after arriving to Patiala last week.“He has been shifted to the state-run COVID centre. Those who are identified as primary contact will be tested tomorrow. The quarantine period for all persons staying in the same quarantine facility has been extended by one week. The centre has been sterilised as per protocol,” SAI’s statement further added.Advertisement In addition to Amit Panghal, the boxing team also includes 2019 Asian Championships silver medal winner Ashish Kumar. The team, which includes a total of eight Olympic qualified pugilists, were quarantined with the doctor at the STC boys’ hostel outside the training campus.In addition to the players, men’s team coach CA Kuttappa, women’s team coach Mohammed Ali Qamar and assistant coach Kheemanand Beniwal will also undergo testing on Tuesday as they were also in touch with Dr Patil.If you like reading about MMA, make sure you check out MMAIndia.com Also follow India’s biggest arm wrestling tournament at ProPanja.comAlso read-Delhi Capitals coach reveals why Rishabh Pant plays better for the IPL franchise than team IndiaHow the Indian cricket calender will change because of the Covid-19 pandemic Advertisementlast_img read more

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AH Women’s Website has Spread Coast-to-Coast

first_imgBy John BurtonATLANTIC HIGHLANDS – It’s surely an age-old question: What to do with the kids today? It’s a question Sherry Lombardi and Kerry Bowbliss, two young mothers with young children, found themselves asking.When they didn’t find an easy and available answer, they felt they weren’t alone and started a company that would meet that need.“We started it because we needed it,” Lombardi said, explaining how their company, Hulafrog, came to be.“The problem is there is so many things to do in the community,” Lombardi said, “but there is no central place to get that information.”The company got its unusual name because its founders wanted something fun, memorable and short that would convey the idea of children and their activities.Kerry Bowbliss, left, and Sherry Lombardi are co-founders of Hulafrog, an Internet company whose websites allow parents in a community to find activities and services for their children in one convenient location.The women, who both live in Atlantic Highlands, started their company in 2010, with a website focusing on the Red Bank area. Since launching the initial site and building their technology platform, Hulafrog has grown to 25 sites around the country. Its founders hope to be in 250 markets by the end of 2013, creating a truly national network of local sites.They are also hoping to garner the interest of national advertisers, Lombardi and Bowbliss said.The site lays out events, classes, activities, shopping and services geared for children, allowing the user to easily search and find specific things or just to get an idea.On the site for Monday, Sept. 17, among the items listed on the Red Bank site, under the “Top Rated Events Today,” were story time at the Red Bank Public Library for both the morning and afternoon sessions; and a baby-and-mom story time at the Monmouth County Public Library, Eastern Branch, in Shrewsbury Borough.The site also features “Our Picks” where those running the sites (publishers, as Lombardi and Bow­bliss call them) highlight some events or activities. On the Red Bank site they emphasized the Mon­mouth Day Care’s Touch-a-Truck event, scheduled for Sat­urday, Sept. 22, at the Red Bank Middle School.“Anybody can go on the site and find hundreds of events,” Lombardi said.Along with those listings, site visitors can find listings of related businesses and profiles of some advertisers.The sites generate revenue through advertising and about 82 percent of visitors have contacted a business that advertised on the sites. The Red Bank site sees about 5,000 to 6,000 visitors a month, the women said.Both women have backgrounds in Internet industries. Lombardi previously co-founded a web analytics firm; Bowbliss was involved in the publishing end of the financial services industry.Both left the corporate grind as they started families. Lombardi has an 8-year-old daughter and a son, 6; Bowbliss’ kids are a son, 8, and a 6-year-old daughter. After staying home with their young ones, the two felt it was time to re-enter the workforce, but maybe not at their previous go-go pace.They feel theirs is not a unique story as they meet women with similar backgrounds who express a similar interest in getting involved in the venture. “Maybe they don’t have 60 hours to work, but maybe they have 30,” Lombardi said.The 25 Hulafrog sites’ publishers are currently all women, who have similar backgrounds – college educated, having worked in marketing or related fields.The operation is ”kind of Yelp for parents meets Avon,” was how Lombardi explained it, referencing the online guide and the iconic cosmetic company made up of legions of independent distributors. Like Avon, “being able to work at home has been a big part of it,” in attracting publishers, Lombardi said.“For the women who are running these sites, it’s challenging and rewarding,” she said. “It’s a job they can sink their teeth in.” The position allows them to get out in the community and relate to others in a peer-to-peer way.The publishers are paid on a commission basis, like Avon, Lombardi said.They believe the future looks promising because, as long as there are kids, parents are going to be looking for ways to entertain, educate and occupy.“Remember, there’s always something going on,” Bowbliss said.last_img read more

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Red Bank Regional Welcomes Six Into Hall of Fame

first_imgLITTLE SILVER –The Red Bank Regional (RBR) BUC Backer Foundation inducted six distinguished alumni into its 2016 Hall of Fame on April 29. They join the ranks of the 120 honorees previously inducted into the Alumni Hall of Fame over the last 14 years by the RBR BUC Backer Foundation.The new members are:• Janice A. Egeland, Ph.D., Class of 1952, Professor Emerita, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science. Adjunct Professor, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry• S. Thomas Westerman, M.D., Class of 1952, Clinical Professor of Otolaryngology Drexel University College of Medicine, Retired Ear, Nose and Throat Physician• Dean S. Ross, Class of 1969, Community leader and small business owner• Lindsay Maggio, M.D., Class of 1998, Assistant Professor University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine• Tahj Holden, Class of 1999, Sports and Entertainment Associate, Financial Advisor at Morgan Stanley, Varsity Boy’s Basketball Coach at Ranney School• Bo Olsen, Class of 2004, Captain in the United States ArmyRBR Buccaneer student newspaper writers read the biographies they each wrote on the Distinguished Alumni. In addition to a special brunch prepared by RBR’s Culinary Art students in the RBR media center, RBR Visual & Performing Art piano majors provided musical accompaniment.Every year RBR BUC Backer Foundation sponsors the induction of distinguished alumni in the Hall of Fame. All of the Distinguished Alumni have enjoyed long distinguished careers in their profession and as community leaders and volunteers. Additionally, the special student guests invited represent those with promise to become future distinguished alumni.The RBR BUC Backer Foundation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to funding broad-based educational programs through teacher-requested grants at Red Bank Regional High School. The foundation also coordinates the Distinguished Alumni Hall of Fame and honors its inductees each year.last_img read more

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Debbie Mans Named DEP Deputy Commissioner

first_imgBy Jay Cook |TRENTON – A longtime environmentalist who worked to improve the health of local waterways is leaving the Two River area for Trenton.Debbie Mans, the former executive director of the Keyport-based NY/NJ Baykeeper, was appointed last week to serve as the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection’s (DEP) deputy commissioner, the agency announced. Mans was handpicked by the acting-DEP commissioner, Catherine R. McCabe.The hire has also served as a rallying cry for local environmentalists who say New Jersey will benefit from Mans’ years of expertise and ability to negotiate.“We had to play a lot of defense for the last eight years trying to stop bad things from happening,” said Greg Remaud, the acting executive director of NY/NJ Baykeeper. “We believe now that’s going to reverse.”Mans had been the face of NY/NJ Baykeeper since 2008, a self-proclaimed “citizen guardian” for the Hudson-Raritan Estuary that encompasses waters in New York and New Jersey. Mans and NY/NJ Baykeeper have been busy on the homefront in recent years, pushing for new programs and more pro-environmental legislation on the state level.More recently, Mans has been sternly opposed to the 23-mile-long Williams Transco Pipeline project planned to be built through Raritan Bay. She also testified before Congress last month in support of the $1.3-billion Passaic River Superfund cleanup site program destined for North Jersey.“I am excited to join the Department of Environmental Protection and get to work on a number of key environmental issues facing our state,” said Mans, in a statement. “We need to ensure that New Jersey is on a path to clean energy and sustainability, while also protecting public health, cleaning up polluted sites, and conserving our natural resources.”Mans’ path back to Trenton has been a busy one. From 2006 to 2008, she was the environmental and energy policy advisor to then-Gov. Jon Corzine, helping craft clean energy plans through 2020. Before that, from 2002 through 2006, she served as NY/NJ Baykeeper’s policy director.“Debbie Mans’ commitment to clean energy and conservation makes her an excellent choice to help the DEP lead the nation in developing solutions to such critical issues as climate change and renewable energy,” McCabe said in a statement. “Debbie has spent her entire career devoted to improving the environment for all, and I look forward to her expertise helping shape our mission.”Throughout that tenure of protecting water quality, organizing open space and fighting battles with large energy companies, Mans has collaborated with many of the local environmentalist groups who call the Two River area home.“It’s extremely important and of great value to have someone at that level who not only understands the issues of consequence that affect our quality of life, but also someone that knows the value of grassroots and citizen involvement,” said Cindy Zipf, Clean Ocean Action’s executive director.Zipf said COA has worked with Baykeeper on environmental law enforcement issues, as well as how to tackle green energy on a statewide platform in their time.Yet more than anything, Mans’ hire signals a stark change from Gov. Chris Christie’s DEP, Zipf said.“Time will tell, but it’s certainly a 180 in terms of the interest in broad environmental issues facing our state,” she said.Tim Dillingham, executive director of the American Littoral Society, said state policy is in more-than-capable hands.“She is smart and principled, an unfailing advocate for the environment with a lot of experience in both government and the advocacy sides,” Dillingham said. “I have nothing but high regard for her.”Dillingham and Mans go back to some of their first environmental policy positions. From 2000 to 2002, Mans was a policy and outreach specialist for the Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association in Pennington. At the same time, Dillingham was on the board of directors there.Their partnership flourished when they both ended up leading environmental groups headquartered along the same body of water along the Jersey Shore.NY/NJ Baykeeper has been one of the state’s leaders in reintroducing oyster reefs to rivers and bays. Oysters can filter up to 50 gallons of water a day and many believe they could be the answer to helping remove pollutants in the water.After installing manmade oyster castles off of the 2.9-mile-long Naval Weapons Station Earle Pier in Leonardo in 2016, NY/NJ Baykeeper announced in December oyster spat, or baby oysters were found growing on the structures.The American Littoral Society has been trying to implement a similar program in the Navesink and Shrewsbury rivers, beginning this past summer. Dillingham said his organization is following similar steps to see his program flourish in the two rivers.And Dillingham had a message for the private and public sectors who soon will interact with Mans.“She’s a great negotiator and she’s going to find a way to push the public’s agenda and still engage all the stakeholders that the state government has to please,” he said.Remaud Named Acting Executive DirectorNY/NJ Baykeeper announced on Tuesday evening that Greg Remaud would be named the organization’s acting executive director for the time being. Official changes and possible restructuring will happen in March when its board of directors convenes.It’s an honor for Remaud, who has been with NY/NJ Baykeeper now for two decades.“From Dery (Bennett), to Andy (Willner), to Debbie (Mans), those are three extraordinary environmentalists and human beings,” he said. “It means a lot to have that opportunity and follow in those footsteps.”Remaud’s time has been spent as NY/NJ Baykeeper’s conservation director, where he spent years “trying to preserve natural land and open space in areas that are densely developed where (residents) don’t have a lot.”Since the organization began in 1989, it has preserved over 3,500 acres of land ranging from the North Jersey Meadowlands to the Raritan Bayshore. Most recently, NY/NJ Baykeeper helped preserve 250 acres for the newly formulated Freneau Woods, an addition to the Monmouth County Park System.This article was first published in the Feb. 15-22, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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